Calling all mamas whose LOs STTN! - Page 2 - Mothering Forums
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Life With a Baby > Calling all mamas whose LOs STTN!
LittleBirdy's Avatar LittleBirdy 07:52 AM 04-13-2011

Quote:

Originally Posted by P.J. View Post


 


 

To the first part of your post (in bold): I forgot to mention, I know we got lucky with Max being a great night sleeper. However, we got "unlucky" in other areas. Firstly, he had colic and screamed inconsolably a LOT in the first 3.5 months of his life. The fact that he then STTN was what saved us. We were all miserable, but at least we were pretty well-rested! And now, he is a high needs baby, very intense and demanding. I see friends with easy-going, mellow babies and sometimes I get jealous. However, I then listen to them complaining about how they got not sleep last night and I remember: you win some, you lose some (if that metaphor fits). Lucky in one area, unlucky in another.

 

As for your situation, I see your LO will be one in a couple months. Ya know, from one year of age, night weaning is an option. Many people are against it, but to be honest if my baby was a terrible sleeper, I would certainly be considering it (after one year). Here are a couple links you might find useful:

 

http://drjaygordon.com/attachment/sleeppattern.html

 

http://www.kellymom.com/bf/weaning/weaning-night.html

 

I know some parents find their baby is able to STTN once they've night weaned. It is not a fun process (and if you read those links you'll see it will probably involve some crying, but you stay with the baby, it is not CIO!), but if you are exhausted and feel everyone would do better with a good night's sleep, then maybe you can consider night weaning in a few months after your baby turns one.

 



P.J. I was just thinking about this the other day (the part I bolded).  All my friends IRL who had summer babies have babies who STTN.  Some BF, some not.  Some did CIO, some didn't.  No cosleepers as far as I know.  Mine sleeps like crap....... but I weigh 10 pounds less than I did when I got pregnant, and they are still carrying around baby weight!  Not that one has ANYTHING to do with the other, but it is like my little consolation prize for having a difficult sleeper.  (For the record, I have always struggled with my weight so this is a huge surprise to me!)

 

And I also agree that nightweaning might be the answer.  If the sleep is still this bad once we hit a year we might try it.

 



Knitting Mama 08:34 AM 04-13-2011


Quote:
Originally Posted by expat-mama View Post

Thanks for all these responses! I really appreciate all the time you mamas took to respond. It's really interesting to see the different answers to all my questions.

 

I'm not sure my quest will be too fruitful... It might just come down to you mamas with LOs who STTN being LUCKY. And us poor saps being incredibly unlucky.

 

As far as I can tell, I'm doing everything "right" and we've tried pretty much all the other "right" things over the months to no avail. The only thing I haven't tried are the things that we have deemed "not right" for our son and for us- CIO, bottle feeding, putting him in another room, and breast feeding on a schedule etc. Wouldn't it be freaking crazy if THOSE things worked for him? They seem to work for some other people (I'm not referring to you mamas). I'm questioning all sorts of things right now...just at the end of my rope I guess. Another bad night last night and I'm unravelled today.

 

Anyway...thanks again mamas!


Regarding the bolded part-- I probably should add that, while I never set out to regiment her breastfeeding, I did "consolidate" some of her night nursing. It wasn't done consciously, though, it was a "natural progression" thing. Here's what happened: I've had a low supply from the start, thanks to breast surgery. For the first 5 or 6 months, she was content bare nursing at night and would get her donated milk in the SNS in the morning. Around that time, bare nursing stopped being enough, so I was getting up fully and supplementing her. Because I was actually up, I could make sure she was staying latched on and getting a full feeding, like 5 or 6 oz of milk. And amazingly, she started sleeping longer stretches because of it. Soon enough, we were down to only one "wake up and nurse" a night, I know of other people who have consolidated nursings more purposely with the same success. I don't know if you would consider it scheduling nursing or not, but you might want to try getting up fully at night (as much as that sucks) to ensure he drinks a lot, and see if that helps.


Laurski's Avatar Laurski 11:52 AM 04-13-2011

I just *knew* I was going to jinx myself by writing on this thread!

 

DD was up at 3:30 this morning, and refused to go back to sleep until about 5:30.  And those were 2 *very* cranky hours...

 

The sleep gods must be angry at me for daring to speak of STTN in anything other than hushed, reverential tones.  lol.gif


ar2974's Avatar ar2974 04:53 PM 04-13-2011


Quote:
Originally Posted by Sfcmama View Post

So... In case I missed it, is anyone SSTN and BFing AND co-sleeping?

Yes - scroll up for my post.  My older daughter used to sstn (she might have nursed once and not really woken me) from about 6 weeks or so also.  My kids are just mellow.
 

 


Sorin's Avatar Sorin 08:39 PM 04-13-2011

My DD will be one on Saturday (!) but she has slept through the night since . . . 8-9 months?  In her case, STTN means from about 7pm until about 7am.  From about 6-8 months, she was waking once a night, and from about 4-6 months, she was waking twice.  Prior to that, it was too many times to count! 

 

She sleeps in our room but not in our bed, hated to be worn, is a halfway decent napper (at least one good nap a day of about 2 hours), and was breastfed until about 10 1/2 months when she started hitting me, pushing away, and biting me while nursing.

 

My DD has always naturally been a good sleeper, which is great because she is . . . um . . . challenging in other areas.  My kid could win a screaming contest.  Seriously.  There were a few things that I did do to facilitate good sleeping habits.  There does come a time when a baby is physically capable of not needing to eat in the middle of the night.  You have to determine when that point is for your baby, but for mine, it did fall around the age that most of the books recommend (about 6 months or so).  This was around the time that she was moving to one wake up, and I was nursing her before putting her back to sleep.  Once the one wake up became a solid pattern, DH started taking night duty.  He would change her and then put her back in her crib with her pacifier (she never rejected the paci and uses it when she sleeps).  From almost the beginning, she did go right back to sleep.  Sometimes, he would have to soothe her back to sleep, but we did not feed her.  During the day, she ate to her heart's content (and my kid can *eat*).  Around that time, she was eating 2-3 meals of solid food a day (things like peas, carrots, bananas, applesauce, squash, etc.) and nursing on demand.  I really do believe that night weaning for us was the key to beginning the full STTN process. 

 

The other thing that helped her to STTN was a little paci strategy my DH came up with.  For a while she continued to wake once a night, but if we gave her the paci, she would go back to sleep.  One day, she was lying on the bed next to me playing and sucking on her paci.  She accidentally spit it out, and it fell on the bed by her ear.  I watched her take her hand, bring it up to her head to feel around for the paci, find it, and stick it back into her own mouth.  Voila!  The paci strategy was then born.  When DD goes to bed, we put like seven pacis in the bed with her. So when she wakes up (and occasionally, I do hear her wake up once in the middle of the night), she feels around for her paci, pops it back in her mouth and goes back to sleep.  She's been doing this since about 8 months or so. 

 

I know that we are lucky on the sleeping front, but I thank my lucky stars for this because we did not get lucky with a few other personality quirks (did I mention that she's a screamer?)  We did, however, use a few strategies to make sure that she slept well.  I hope they help!

 


ciga's Avatar ciga 08:44 PM 04-13-2011


Quote:
Originally Posted by P.J. View Post


 


 

To the first part of your post (in bold): I forgot to mention, I know we got lucky with Max being a great night sleeper. However, we got "unlucky" in other areas. Firstly, he had colic and screamed inconsolably a LOT in the first 3.5 months of his life. The fact that he then STTN was what saved us. We were all miserable, but at least we were pretty well-rested! And now, he is a high needs baby, very intense and demanding. I see friends with easy-going, mellow babies and sometimes I get jealous. However, I then listen to them complaining about how they got not sleep last night and I remember: you win some, you lose some (if that metaphor fits). Lucky in one area, unlucky in another.

 

As for your situation, I see your LO will be one in a couple months. Ya know, from one year of age, night weaning is an option. Many people are against it, but to be honest if my baby was a terrible sleeper, I would certainly be considering it (after one year). Here are a couple links you might find useful:

 

http://drjaygordon.com/attachment/sleeppattern.html

 

http://www.kellymom.com/bf/weaning/weaning-night.html

 

I know some parents find their baby is able to STTN once they've night weaned. It is not a fun process (and if you read those links you'll see it will probably involve some crying, but you stay with the baby, it is not CIO!), but if you are exhausted and feel everyone would do better with a good night's sleep, then maybe you can consider night weaning in a few months after your baby turns one.

 


Okay, I can't say that we're STTN yet but I do feel like things are getting better.  Slowly.  My son has been a terrible sleeper from the get go.   From ~2-4 months we went through a period where he only woke twice a night (i thought that was a lot at the time) and then the s@$t hit the fan and from 4-12 months he was a 4-5+ times a night-nurser sometimes with lots of crying and flailing. I felt like I was going to loose my mind.

We bedshare, BF, and he eats tons of solids and I decided that as a gift to myself for his 1st birthday I had to try everything possible to get more sleep which for me ended up meaning nightweaning.  We don't even have the option of moving DS to another room so I appreciated that Gordon is speaking to bedsharing parents who intend to continue bedsharing beyond nightweaning.   I started off with Pantley's book and to be honest it just wasn't working for us so I did more research and found Dr. Jay Gordon's site.  I feel like his method is really working. DS is still waking but its getting easier and easier to soothe him back to sleep with just a hand or a shhhhhh and I feel like he's waking less. It definitely isn't going as quickly as the directions kind of imply it will but hey, anything is better than complete sleep deprivation.  It also just makes me feel like I can be proactive about the situation without doing anything I feel is cruel.

 

 


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