So What's Wrong With Pureed Food? - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 05:01 AM - Thread Starter
 
clavicula's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 2,031
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
As i lurk here in LWAB, i always read the wise mamas saying to skip baby food, spoon feeding, etc.
I have just one Q: WHY? (no flames, please, it is just a question)
TIA

Liv, SAHM of 3 kiddos 

 

 

 

 

clavicula is offline  
#2 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 05:10 AM
 
skettisauce's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm not sure of other people's reasoning, but my reason is because I figure if they can't eat it, then they aren't ready for it.

For instance- my baby got avocado first then banana. Just a whole avocado with the skin peeled off, the whole banana without the peel. Next we did apple with part of the skin peeled. The baby gets what she is able to eat developmentally. (When we did apple, baby had two lower teeth and was able to scrape a *tiny* bit of the apple off, but wasn't able to get any of the skin off.)

If you are pureeing foods, there is also a higher risk of overfeeding. With letting the baby eat the whole food, you can tell when they are done (usually when she starts playing in it rather than eating it )
skettisauce is offline  
#3 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 05:14 AM
 
Rico'sAlice's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Southern Berkshire County, MA
Posts: 3,167
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
:

Also, because if presented with food options from the table and allowed to self feed babies will often instinctively avoid foods they are allergic to/intolerant of.
Rico'sAlice is offline  
#4 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 08:27 AM
 
Sierra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 6,449
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My favorite reasons:

1. Early food experiences help introduce a world of flavor to the child, flavors that are part of the child's cultural heritage and that will be a part of the child's growing up years. If you are feeding babyfood, the child is less likely to be eating what you are (unless you are making your own babyfood from the food you eat, but even then, parents often skip the herbs and spices they put into their own foods...spices, for example, can seem a lot "hotter" when there isn't a textural experience).

2. The point of early food experiences isn't nutrition. Children at that age are still getting the benefits of other nutritional sources, usually breastmilk...and they don't actually *need* to be consuming a whole lot. Usually, babyfood is presented to children to get food *in* them. The focus is on getting the baby to eat. What is lost when getting food into children becomes the primary goal, rather than the whole discovery process that comes with a slower introduction of whole foods? Sensory and textural experiences that are rich in developmental meaning and value, and that pass on cultural food experiences. Texture is just as important as taste.

3. When eating non-pureed foods, a child can do things like practice eye hand coordination, the pincer grasp, dropping and picking back up and dropping and picking back up again, etc. etc....lots of good skill practice is going on.

4. When a child is eating what the family eats, it is a family experience. Through this, a child learns the value of shared family meals.

5. Children can usually learn their own limitations, and generally become quite adept at guaging what they can handle when it comes to food and other stuff going in the mouth...if they are given the opportunity. Children who aren't given the opportunity, are slower to gain the skills and thus, it is possible that they are more likely to choke.

6. Chewing is good for oral motor development and oral sensory awareness. Good oral motor development and sensory awareness are among the things needed for proper speech development (I say this because my ds has low muscle tone in his mouth due to a genetic condition, and he really struggles).



http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9646449/

I'm pro-adoption reform, but not anti-adoption.
Sierra is offline  
#5 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 08:37 AM
 
peike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 25
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I never heard it

SO but when do you start offering fod then, when babe can hold spoon?
peike is offline  
#6 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 08:54 AM - Thread Starter
 
clavicula's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 2,031
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
thanks, good points. dd hated pureed food (i made it from our food), so i am sure she instinctively did that.
i will skip it with next babe, it is easier.
anyway, when they start to eat more, are they just "snacking"? how long?

Liv, SAHM of 3 kiddos 

 

 

 

 

clavicula is offline  
#7 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 09:54 AM
 
rootzdawta's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Squarely Outside of the Box
Posts: 3,551
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
DS is 16 mos. old and does not have any molars. I find that if I offer him food whole and let him self feed, well . . . it comes out whole. As such, I typically puree or mash any food that we are eating and allow him to feed himself with a spoon. If it's something like baked potato or avocado, I allow him to eat that kind of thing without processing it first. DS did not become particularly interested in food until recently and I don't think there is any point to feeding him stuff whole if it is just going to come out whole. He just doesn't have a way to process it but it's obvious he's hungry and wants to eat. Plus, I try to remember what my grandmother used to do for my younger siblings and she used to chew the food first and then give it to the baby. In any case, DS is a toddler and still gets lots of breastmilk. So personally, I don't see what is wrong with mashing up or pureeing food. Shoot, I find that with some bean dishes, it actually tastes better pureed because the spices get distributed all throughout the bean "meat".

Stay-at-home mom to 2 beautiful.busy.boisterous boys b. 08.17.05 & 12.29.08
Nirvana is . . . the living happiness of a soul which is conscious of itself and conscious of having found its own abode in the heart of the Eternal. --Gandhi
rootzdawta is offline  
#8 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 10:05 AM
 
mountainsun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: sw fl
Posts: 1,996
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Sierra - great article - thanks! I will be passing that one on

  homeschooling, earth loving Mama to 3 crazy, wonderful boys, ages 10 & 7, & 3 mos.,3 spirit babies                                Inch by inch, row by row.  Gonna make this garden grow  
mountainsun is offline  
#9 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 12:33 PM
 
Sierra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 6,449
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
A note on teeth:

The first teeth that come in are cutting teeth, not chewing teeth (as noted...molars can come in last), and some children don't get any teeth for well over a year.

Nature has designed it amazingly so that it doesn't matter when children get their teeth. Generally, most children can very effectively gum most foods, and produce plenty of saliva to help in the process.

For foods that are not easily gummed, many mothers instictively break these down into smaller bits, sometimes making it soft using their own front teeth (and instinctively no real saliva) before giving it to their children...or for the modern woman who is particularly squeamish at the thought, the same thing can often be acheived-- albeit less effectively-- by working a fork on the food before giving it to the child...

This maintains far more of the texture than if pureeing the food.

I'm pro-adoption reform, but not anti-adoption.
Sierra is offline  
#10 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 01:04 PM
 
alegna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 44,408
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by peike View Post
I never heard it

SO but when do you start offering fod then, when babe can hold spoon?
When baby can self-feed soft bits- like banana or ripe pear.

-Angela
alegna is offline  
#11 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 01:15 PM
 
orangefoot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Oxfordshire UK
Posts: 3,091
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My dd never ate pureed food - its too hard to eat with your hands!!

She began chomping on food from the table at about 7-8 months; she liked to chew and suck on meat and ate all sorts of veg and fruit. She had no teeth until she was one and this never hindered her food exploration.

I did puree lazily back in 1993 when advice was different so I can see the practical and developmental advantages and benefits of avoiding spoon feeding a child and encouraging self feeding with 'real' food.
orangefoot is offline  
#12 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 01:19 PM
 
mimid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 3,158
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Nothing, IMO, just more work to prepare and to feed and I just don't have the time!

Miriam , mom to jumpers.gif
mimid is offline  
#13 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 01:40 PM
 
IselaCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 49
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I seriously never would have thought about this if it wasn't for this great board!! So, like the article mentions, I'm one of those nervous parents that are looking for "detailed guidance". Is there any books out there that discuss this? All baby food books have recipes for pureeing food. I still have a while to go before my guy is even close to eating, but I would like to be as informed as possible when it comes!

Ciria, mama to Joaquin 11/28/06 and Isela 8/07/09
IselaCB is offline  
#14 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 01:45 PM
 
*mama moose*'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Antioch, CA
Posts: 1,666
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have a question too, when it says introduce one food at a time, how does that work with offering them table food? Say I have mashed potatoes and give DD some, thats most likely got dairy in it too and possibly some type of animal or veggie broth depending on who made the potatoes. do I count that as one food or no? Do I wait until after a year since it may have dairy in it? I plan to start her with an avacado, and then maybe bananas, but after that I'm lost
and of course, my DH bought her organic pured food (so we have it on hand, DD is no where near eating solids yet) thinking he did good.....poor guy, he tries so hard to do right by my NFL/AP style and I always seem to find something new that doesn't fit with the new thing he got LOL. (this happened before when he showed up with the knock off bjorn all proud that he embraced babywearing, and a week later I tell him its bad for hips and spines.....luckily I bought him an ergo so he's happy now...)

mama to August May (8/06) Liberty Kiana (7/08) and Calliope Rose (6/15/10)
*mama moose* is offline  
#15 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 02:17 PM
 
summerbabe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 450
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Sierra--the reasons you list make so much sense. And the article--I am bookmarking that to send to anyone who may be skeptical or question the way I am doing things, or for other moms who are open to it. I am enjoying your thoughtful posts on this and other threads. Thanks for sharing your ideas/wisdom.

In general, I am very grateful to these boards for educating me on this issue. Without MDC, I may very well have been among those who shovel in the jars of baby food. I thought I was with the program because I was going to skip the cereal and use only organic baby food. HA!
summerbabe is offline  
#16 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 03:06 PM
 
Romana's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 4,365
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We often lightly puree lean meat in the blender for her, which usually comes out kind of like a paste (that she can and does play with, like a soft banana, avocado, or mashed potatoes, all of which she eats) because she really just shoves too much meat in her mouth and chokes. She doesn't chew the first piece/hunk whatever before moving on to the next, and so she chokes. (Think chicken drumstick, which seemed like a rather natural first meat to me.)

Dh and I both weren't willing to let her keep choking , so we puree those foods that she handles poorly and keep eliminating the puree-ing whenever we can. She's 9.5 mos old right now. I'm sure a small amount of choking is useful and not dangerous and helpful in teaching the babe how to eat, but it was a patience issue here (for her, not for us) and not something she was learning from.

We only very rarely use a spoon, and usually just if she's wearing something really special that we don't want to get dirty (like a special occasion). Everyone looks at me like I'm crazy because I let her "explore" and play with her food. At Thanksgiving, the Evil Aunt said "If you let her do that, she'll never learn how to use a spoon!" I laughed out loud, lol.

Julia
dd 9mos
Romana is offline  
#17 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 03:08 PM
 
Romana's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 4,365
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
In rereading some of the posts I think the way we do the meat is more like what I instinctively do with my fingers than puree-ing per se. When we don't have the blender available, I tear off tiny bits of meat, but it's very inefficient and I don't get to eat much, lol. So the blender works well for that.

Good point about what mamas do instinctually. I can see that in how we've fed dd.

Julia
dd 9mos
Romana is offline  
#18 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 04:18 PM
 
writermommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,343
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Please no flames... I have a ? for the no spoon feeding at all moms. Do you cook foods (vegetables, for example) until they are super soft to avoid choking? If you do, are you at all concerned about cooking the vitamins out of them? This is my fourth baby and I do a little of both, some spoon, some chunks. I don't really cook veggies until they are mushy because they lose most of their nutrients that way. I worry that if I don't make them super soft, the babe will choke. I hope this makes sense. I'm seriously sleep deprived here!
writermommy is offline  
#19 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 05:03 PM
 
tamagotchi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 2,096
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by writermommy View Post
I have a ? for the no spoon feeding at all moms. Do you cook foods (vegetables, for example) until they are super soft to avoid choking?
I just cook everything the way I would normally eat it. If something seems like a choking hazard I will either cut it smaller, or pre-chew it a little before giving it to DS (for example, I'll chew little bits of steak for him). Or sometimes it's good to give a larger piece, like a whole apple, so that he can gnaw off small bites for himself.
tamagotchi is offline  
#20 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 05:10 PM
 
sunnysideup's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 3,483
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by writermommy View Post
Do you cook foods (vegetables, for example) until they are super soft to avoid choking? If you do, are you at all concerned about cooking the vitamins out of them?
I was never too concerned about getting lots of solids into my kids when they were babies. They were getting most of their nutrition from breastmilk. After 6-8 months of age, I would give small, pea sized bites that they could feed themselves. Generally, food that was naturally pretty soft--bananas, grapes, melon, squash, avacado, tofu, peas, corn...
sunnysideup is offline  
#21 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 05:22 PM
 
alegna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 44,408
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by writermommy View Post
Please no flames... I have a ? for the no spoon feeding at all moms. Do you cook foods (vegetables, for example) until they are super soft to avoid choking? If you do, are you at all concerned about cooking the vitamins out of them? This is my fourth baby and I do a little of both, some spoon, some chunks. I don't really cook veggies until they are mushy because they lose most of their nutrients that way. I worry that if I don't make them super soft, the babe will choke. I hope this makes sense. I'm seriously sleep deprived here!
Depends on what it is. Sweet potatoes I steamed- they still held their shape, but could be mouthed apart.

BUT remember that in the first year solids aren't for nutrition at all- they're for play.

-Angela
alegna is offline  
#22 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 05:30 PM
 
Sierra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 6,449
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by peike View Post
SO but when do you start offering fod then, when babe can hold spoon?
No spoons necessary . With each baby, it is so different.

With my ds, he had all the signs of readiness that are typically listed for when babies can start to eat, pretty much, and was *very* interested around five months. One day he was going nuts for a vegetable sandwich I was eating...grabbing at it and *immitating my chewing* and screaming out when I didn't give him any. I gave him other stuff, including a cup to play with, but it wasn't what he wanted. I looked at what there was in the sandwich, and I wanted to start with something sort of digestively mild. It had a bunch of jalepenos and pickles and stuff, but I thought some lettuce would do. I tore off the teeniest, tiniest little piece (about the size of the "e" here or smaller), and put it in his mouth. I didn't even think he would notice, but he did. He was very interested in the sensation of it in his mouth. As soon as it fell out of his mouth or he swallowed it, he would scream really loudly and with such urgency until I would give him some more. So I ended up giving him several teeny, tiny bits.

However, even though that was his first experience with solid food, he really didn't "start solids" until much later. We would just follow his interest level. Some meals he would want a bite or two to knaw on, other meals he had no interest at all. He often went days, and many times even weeks without having anything. Then, around the time that he really started mastering his hand eye coordination and could get stuff into his mouth really well (I can't remember exactly when this was...maybe seven months), his interest increased greatly. By that point, he would just grab stuff off our plates during meals and eat it. Eventually, he started eating with us more meals than not (maybe nine or ten months), and he started eating enough that we were giving him his own plates. Around that time, we would give him child-sized silverware, which he rarely chose to use but did sometimes play with it. His use of it increased once he was a little over a year, and now at 20 months, he chooses to use the silverware we give him a good portion of the time, and uses it pretty well overall.

dfd was a different story entirely. She came to our home at six months and was already eating babyfoods and rice cereal, and had been since she was maybe even weeks old. She did not have signs of readiness, other than the fact that she was able to sit up. She also wasn't particularly interested. We took her off rice cereal, then gradually weaned her down with the babyfoods simply by only feeding her when she seemed hungry and her bottle didn't take care of it. One day, she just stopped eating them, all on her own...by the fact that she no longer seemed hungry between her bottles. And then, a week or two later (she was probably seven or eight months), she was ready to start back up again, but this time, we just gave her stuff from her plates. And all of the sudden she brightened up about foods. She took to them fast and furiously, and began eating at every meal on her own volition.

I'm pro-adoption reform, but not anti-adoption.
Sierra is offline  
#23 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 05:40 PM
 
KarmaJoy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Missouri
Posts: 435
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I didn't really delay solids but we started really slow and dd basically self fed the whole time. Basically, I hated spoon feeding and she didn't seem to care if she got it or not. Usually, I would soak cherrio-type cereal in pureed veggies (it gets super soggy) and then let her self feed. She and I were both happy. She is 15 months and still eats tiny portions compared to our mainstream friends the same age (dd is still bfing). Like a pp said, food still comes out whole, so let them learn and enjoy self feeding. I think that it contributed to dd being quite adept with her fine motors skills since she has had to pick up food to feed herself since 6 months old.
KarmaJoy is offline  
#24 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 06:06 PM
 
Wolfcat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 1,110
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by IselaCB View Post
I seriously never would have thought about this if it wasn't for this great board!! So, like the article mentions, I'm one of those nervous parents that are looking for "detailed guidance". Is there any books out there that discuss this? All baby food books have recipes for pureeing food. I still have a while to go before my guy is even close to eating, but I would like to be as informed as possible when it comes!
I just let DS hold pieces of whatever I'm eating. If he puts it in his mouth, he does much better then when I "feed" him. That is, he doesn't make the WTH look. He likes to chew foods and play with foods, but I don't really see him eating much.

I give him pieces that are about pinky-finger sized/shaped, so it's easy for him to hold and chew, but too big to really choke on. And when he gags, it's because he has some caught in the back of his throat, so I finger sweep to clean it out. (One night was really fun - he wouldn't stop gagging; we found out he put the food into his chipmunk cheeks! )

Check out my business, Pangaia Metaphysical Store, and radio blog, Pagan Musings.
I'm a witchy mama to DS ('06) and DD ('10) with DH, Stormie, a heathen homemaker daddy.

Wolfcat is offline  
#25 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 06:15 PM
 
Sierra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 6,449
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by *mama moose* View Post
I have a question too, when it says introduce one food at a time, how does that work with offering them table food? Say I have mashed potatoes and give DD some, thats most likely got dairy in it too and possibly some type of animal or veggie broth depending on who made the potatoes. do I count that as one food or no?
Here is the way we did it. The very first foods that we gave our wee ones were single things off our plates. For example, if we made rice and beans, we'd just give rice or just give beans (usually beans because rice would have bean juice on them). If I was eating a sandwich, I'd just give a little cucumber, or whatever.

Gradually, my confidence would increase over time as I saw them handle a greater variety of foods. Once they had a reportoire of foods (really, not many...maybe 3-6) under their belt, I would give them combo foods. For example, if ds had already had beans, tomatoes, and lettuce on their own, giving him the insides of a burrito with those things and guacomole and onion wouldn't be a big deal. Because then, if they reacted, it would just be a matter of sorting between the onion and what was in the guacomole as potential allergens...so basically like, oh, five different foods maximum. Then this would further build their repetoire in that one leap, and I would be able to give them even more stuff.

This worked well overall, but in practicality there were times when I'd eat something, and they'd show interest, and it would be something where they really hadn't tried any of the ingrediants before. The trick there is two things: (1) Eat at home as often as possible, with foods that you have prepared from scratch as much as possible. Then you can be sure about the ingrediants, and also fewer ingrediants will have been used. If you are short on time, use eat foods prepared that have as few ingrediants as possible, no preservatives, etc. (2) Don't worry too much. Follow your instincts. Trust your babies interest, and know that if allergies show up, you can sort them out.

Now I will say that the waiting several days between foods happened more in the begining, when ds wasn't interested at all meals. He would naturally end up waiting between foods. But there were times when he would try new stuff a couple days or even a couple meals in a row, which does complicate sorting out allergies if they show up because it can take days. But I didn't stress about it because like I said, at the start, he really spaced things pretty naturally.

Quote:
Do I wait until after a year since it may have dairy in it?
According to a recent review of the research, no. I generally chose to start by giving my kids whatever on my plate seemed somewhat digestively mild, but for example, both ds and dfd had whole eggs (yolk and whites) by the time they were maybe eight or nine months.

Quote:
I plan to start her with an avacado, and then maybe bananas, but after that I'm lost
After that, just give her whatever on your plate seems interesting to her. Then she can get to know the rich taste combinations and textures of your family's everyday fare.

Quote:
and of course, my DH bought her organic pured food (so we have it on hand, DD is no where near eating solids yet) thinking he did good
The fruits can be good ingrediants for baking. They can be used to cut down on the sugar you put in baked goods. Also, you could always keep it around for times when you are short on fruits or vegetables or whatever and won't have time to shop for a while. We have used babyfoods a handful of times (I can count them on one hand) with our kidos in just such "emergencies..." when they otherwise would be overdosing on things like bread.

I'm pro-adoption reform, but not anti-adoption.
Sierra is offline  
#26 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 10:12 PM
 
huggerwocky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 5,544
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I don't think there is anything wrong, my older daughter would not eat anything even resembling bits and pieces until nearly 2 years old. She'd choke on anything.I believe our forefathers used to pre-chew and then feed this to the babies which has now become kissing.
huggerwocky is offline  
#27 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 10:51 PM
 
Enudely's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 1,707
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

mama to dd (4-15-06) and
ds (2-23-09)
Enudely is offline  
#28 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 11:01 PM
 
vermontgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Northern Vermont
Posts: 2,124
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierra View Post
My favorite reasons:

1. Early food experiences help introduce a world of flavor to the child, flavors that are part of the child's cultural heritage and that will be a part of the child's growing up years. If you are feeding babyfood, the child is less likely to be eating what you are (unless you are making your own babyfood from the food you eat, but even then, parents often skip the herbs and spices they put into their own foods...spices, for example, can seem a lot "hotter" when there isn't a textural experience).

2. The point of early food experiences isn't nutrition. Children at that age are still getting the benefits of other nutritional sources, usually breastmilk...and they don't actually *need* to be consuming a whole lot. Usually, babyfood is presented to children to get food *in* them. The focus is on getting the baby to eat. What is lost when getting food into children becomes the primary goal, rather than the whole discovery process that comes with a slower introduction of whole foods? Sensory and textural experiences that are rich in developmental meaning and value, and that pass on cultural food experiences. Texture is just as important as taste.

3. When eating non-pureed foods, a child can do things like practice eye hand coordination, the pincer grasp, dropping and picking back up and dropping and picking back up again, etc. etc....lots of good skill practice is going on.

4. When a child is eating what the family eats, it is a family experience. Through this, a child learns the value of shared family meals.

5. Children can usually learn their own limitations, and generally become quite adept at guaging what they can handle when it comes to food and other stuff going in the mouth...if they are given the opportunity. Children who aren't given the opportunity, are slower to gain the skills and thus, it is possible that they are more likely to choke.

6. Chewing is good for oral motor development and oral sensory awareness. Good oral motor development and sensory awareness are among the things needed for proper speech development (I say this because my ds has low muscle tone in his mouth due to a genetic condition, and he really struggles).



http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9646449/
These are all my favorite reasons. I love the cultural idea of it. The baby learns that what he/she is eating is the same as the rest of the family. They will learn to love all foods the way that they will eat them throughout their whole lives. They learn the value of family dinner and shared meals. Brilliant!

Living the Joyful life as a mama of three beautiful children who are just right the way they are.

I blog at www.saboss.blogspot.com chicken3.gif

vermontgirl is offline  
#29 of 46 Old 01-05-2007, 11:13 PM
 
*mama moose*'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Antioch, CA
Posts: 1,666
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
one more question
what about rather spicy foods? DD seems really interested in indian food when we go out to eat (it could be the bright colors, but she almost always gets her hands in my food! I just wipe them off currently). Is this ok to give her tastes of? How have your babies handled spicy foods and how old were they when you first gave them something spicy?

mama to August May (8/06) Liberty Kiana (7/08) and Calliope Rose (6/15/10)
*mama moose* is offline  
#30 of 46 Old 01-06-2007, 01:41 AM
 
alegna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 44,408
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by *mama moose* View Post
one more question
what about rather spicy foods? DD seems really interested in indian food when we go out to eat (it could be the bright colors, but she almost always gets her hands in my food! I just wipe them off currently). Is this ok to give her tastes of? How have your babies handled spicy foods and how old were they when you first gave them something spicy?
My dd liked spicy MUCH better than bland. I probably gave her spicy stuff around 7 months or so.

-Angela
alegna is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off