SAMH.....not what I expected. - Mothering Forums
Stay at Home Parents > SAMH.....not what I expected.
Mommy2Teagan's Avatar Mommy2Teagan 08:58 PM 06-17-2010
For as long as I can remember I have wanted to be a SAHM. Whenever someone would ask me what I wanted to be when I grew up I would say a SAHM. I've always viewed it as the most important job on the planet. So when I finally became a SAHM I was SO EXCITED!!!!!!!! I couldn't believe that my dreams were coming true. I was not naive though. I knew having a child was going to be challenging at times. Well, DD was a perfect baby. When I say perfect, I mean perfect! Never cried, started sleeping through the night very early, very loveable, etc. Well, somewhere down the line she started getting tempermental, whinny, demanding, aggressive, and downright mean sometimes. She's 21 months now btw. Now like I said I knew that there would be challenging times but I didn't think it was going to be like this. I sometimes just sit her in front of the TV to clam her down (and calm me down). And I never thought I would let her watch TV period. But I find myself just letting her veg out in front of it. I also yell at her. I can't believe that I yell at my child. I even slap her little legs sometimes. I really can't believe that I do that either. I've done all of these things that I said I would never do as a parent out of frustration. At one point I said that I wanted 3 or 4 kids. Now I don't even think that I want more than one. I thought being a SAHM would be fun and our days would be filled with arts and craft, storytime, outside playing, laughing, no TV, and healthy snacks. Instead I don't even feel like doing any of that and I just want to sit her in front of the TV with a cookie (because on top of everything else she refuses all healthy foods I offer). I find myself frusrated and in my frustration I feel as though I am not being the mom that I want to be. I just want to be a great Mom. That's all I have ever wanted. I curled up in my bed yesterday crying and repeating "I didn't sign up for this!" I feel pathetic.

CrunchyChristianMama's Avatar CrunchyChristianMama 09:11 PM 06-17-2010
My DD is also 21 months...

There are many days where I feel the exact same way. I've chatted with my sister (who's pregnant with her 4th) about it some. She said that 12-24 months are by far the hardest and that it does get better/easier if you stick with it. I keep reminding myself of that!

I also realized that her canines are currently coming through and the molars aren't far behind. That really seems to be adding to the drastic personality changes from day to day.

I would suggest trying to be diligent with handling behaviors that arise as that seems to be the key to more good days (and harder bad ones when she decides to really act up). I think in the end it will be rewarded though.
OTMomma's Avatar OTMomma 09:13 PM 06-17-2010
Being a good mom is SO hard.

First off- remember you are the adult, and you are in control- at least of yourself. So stop with the yelling and hitting- if you don't want your child to learn those behaviors don't do them. Forgive yourself for having a bad moment before, and move forward.

I've found my kid's behavior is better when they eat better food, and some foods will make them little monsters- artificial colors, flavors, etc- make for psycho little people who I do just want to sit in front of the TV to not deal with. I got all that stuff out of my house I didn't want the kids to eat. I find that serving toddlers foods in a muffin tin make them more appealing- a bit of healthy cereal in one cup, grapes in another, strawberries, etc. I'm also starting to look at making things from my new "Sneaky Chef" cookbook (just started that).


As for the way the rest of the day goes- if you want to do outtings, play outside, etc, just announce to dd that is what you are going to do today, and make it happen. I have tricked my kids into going outside by actually throwing a ball and getting them to chase it into the yard- get creative and be fun.

Realize that to have good days doing this- is a LOT of work. Good days don't just happen, they require that you put in a HUGE amount of effort. For me that has included reading parenting books, blogs, websites etc to give me more and more ideas for how to make this work.

I hope this helps- I do know what you are talking about, its very very hard. In good news, I found as my oldest got older, there were more and more cool things we could do together that didn't work with a toddler like I had wanted.

Peace,
Linda on the move's Avatar Linda on the move 09:53 PM 06-17-2010
I thought that was about the hardest stage. Puberty is a close second, but you get about a decade to recover inbetween!

Do you guys have a routine? I think that a routine is really the key to living through the toddler years. Are you in a play group or mothers day out or anything? Do you have any friends who are stay at home moms?


I'm off to look for a link that helped me a lot with that stage!
Linda on the move's Avatar Linda on the move 09:53 PM 06-17-2010
I thought that was about the hardest stage. Puberty is a close second, but you get about a decade to recover inbetween!

Do you guys have a routine? I think that a routine is really the key to living through the toddler years. Are you in a play group or mothers day out or anything? Do you have any friends who are stay at home moms?


I'm off to look for a link that helped me a lot with that stage!
hikingmommy's Avatar hikingmommy 02:21 AM 06-18-2010
This too shall pass. Quite cliche, I know, but so true for parenting. Children change so fast. It sounds like your DD is difficult right now. I say use the TV if it helps both of you stay calm. Get out of the house more if that helps. Hire a babysitter to give yourself a break. And know that she will change as soon as you've figured out how to deal with her now. Do you have other friends with toddlers who you can have playdates with to have some adult time for yourself? I know when I'm at the end of my rope that makes a huge difference for me.
I also find it helps me deal with DD (nearly 5) better if I try to see things from her perspective. She drives me nuts sometimes, but I try to remember how young she is, and much of her behaviors that drive me nuts are easily explained and a little easier to accept when I try to see things from her eyes.
Good luck getting through this difficult phase.
happysmileylady's Avatar happysmileylady 02:49 AM 06-18-2010
As the momma of a 19 month old who started to climb onto an end table she KNOWS she isn't supposed to be on, then STOPPED and looked at me with that evil "I'm climbing on the table, are you gonna stop me mom?" look, I completely understand!

My best suggestion...get out and do something. I also have a 14 year old, who does athletics, has a job etc etc, so I am always out running her around, it makes my 19 month old so much easier to handle. And when we don't have errands to do, I take the baby to the neighborhood pool. There's a baby pool, that is only like 6 inches ot 1 ft deep, so she can walk around with no problems. She LOVES it and loves all the other kids there too.

Someone mentioned a daily routine-with the teen, it's impossible for me to work out a daily routine where we do the same thing every day. This week for example, dd1 had soccer conditioning on Monday and Tuesday evening, but then no other day this week. However, she had to work today, from 11 to 1 only. And she works again, for like 5 or so hours, on Sat and Sun. Not to mention that I d work, part time, in the evenings, only about 15 hours a week. BUT, I find that I am better about getting things done, both housework and chore type things, as well as "real" parenting activities, like doing sidewalk chalk or playing ball with her, if I plan out my days. If I sit down and write out a schedule, I am much more likely to follow it, and that makes it more likely that I will actually make something for lunch or dinner (rather than throwing a grilled cheese together or something quick and easy like that.)

One other suggestion, try to find some other kids to get your little one involved with. Quite honestly, it's HARD to provide a toddler's entertainment ALL the time. (or a kid of any age for that matter.) My brother has a 4 yr old and a 3 yr old and dd2 LOVES it when they come over. I will have him over, grill dinner, turn on the sprinkler and the kids entertain each other. That is SO SO SO much easier on me than trying to play with her myself every single day. If you can find a playgroup, or cousins or kids friends or something, then the kids can entertain each other and give you the break you crave without resorting to tv all the time.

BTW, I WISH my toddler would sit and watch tv for a little bit. She will watch, but in passing. The other day, she was just making me crazy, into everything, onto everything, breaking things, just all over every time I turned my back. Finally, I found Micky Mouse Clubhouse ON Demand, cut up some strawberries and peaches, added some Ritz crackers and cheese slices and "locked her up" in the high chair, because it was the only way I got 5 minutes of peace-she wouldn't even nap!
Climbergirl's Avatar Climbergirl 11:30 PM 06-18-2010
I remember looking at my 21 month old (because that was how old I was when my sister was born), and thinking, gosh, no wonder my mom always seemed to hate me! Dealing with that and a newborn and something had to give And I am sure I was a complete nightmare!

Honestly though, they change so much. I sometimes feel like I finally figure out the stage and DS changes. Ack. And now that I am a SAHM, I feel more pressure to be everything to him (when before, he was in daycare and had 10 hours of brain stimulating and enriching activities, I can in no way do that!).

Go to the park. Get out of the house. Our sandbox is our life saver. So is the sprinkler. And the garden hose. Go to the pet store and look at the fish. Just go somewhere.....

AND GO HAVE SOME TIME FOR YOURSELF TO RECHARGE!!!!

And honestly, she will hit a stage where she is an angel! Seriously. Things will go well, and you will have fun with her. And then it will change and be more challenging, but you will have been through one rough patch and saw that it really did not stay that way forever and you deal with it a lot better.

She definitely could be teething. See if you can take a look and see how her gums look. Right now, we are getting the last 2 year molar and I am so excited. And I am feeling more human as I get out of the 1st trimester and I am starting to enjoy being with DS again
Violet2's Avatar Violet2 01:32 AM 06-22-2010
This too shall pass. Maybe visit the GD forum for some strategies that align more with your parenting values?

I've been there. We have all been there. You are not alone.

DD was a pill last week and it was horrid. I hate those phases.

V
Kelly1101's Avatar Kelly1101 11:37 PM 06-22-2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by happysmileylady View Post
As the momma of a 19 month old who started to climb onto an end table she KNOWS she isn't supposed to be on, then STOPPED and looked at me with that evil "I'm climbing on the table, are you gonna stop me mom?" look, I completely understand!
*sigh*

My FOURTEEN-month-old does this. I'm going to have a time with her, I know.

I'm another vote for, get out of the house. Just grab her up, put her in the carseat, and go. If she's just too unruly to be in public, go to the park and find a nice spot of grass away from everyone. If you spend too much time in the house getting on each other's nerves, you'll go crazy. Got relatives within driving distance who would love to see their little grandchild/neice/whatever? Go let them "enjoy" her while you get some actual grown-up company. I love my little girl more than anything, but sometimes I will go to my hometown for the day (an hour's drive away) just to let someone ELSE entertain her for a little while.
Avarie's Avatar Avarie 06:14 PM 06-30-2010
Y'know, it's OK to realize that you were wrong in thinking that you wanted to be a SAHM. I was the same way! Some of us just aren't cut out for it, IMHO. I SAH exclusively for 6 months after DS1 was born, and was going craaaaaaazy. So, I got a PT job with a family friend's company that allowed me to take him to work. After DS2 was born, that was no longer an option. So I enrolled in college part time. I take classes 2 nights a week, which is a total sanity saver for me. I get to be around adults who have similar interests, and I'm learning something I love. Plus, when I'm done I'll be able to get back to work in a profession I enjoy with better pay and more options.

It's also OK to realize that you don't want as many kids as you thought! DH and I always said 3 or 4, but I have such chronic issues with ADD, depression, and anxiety that we've realized that it's probably best that we stop at 2.

I guess what I'm trying to say is that it's OK to change your mind!
TheGirls's Avatar TheGirls 09:20 AM 07-02-2010
I found that age to be an absolute nightmare. My DD is only just 2yo and it's already so much better. It helped me a lot to get out of the house every single day. Run an errand, visit friends, find a park, go run around the mall (it was winter when DD was in this place). And go find neighbors and friends frequently also. DD really needs to spend time with people who are not me sometimes, she gets bored (and acts up) when it's just me and her for a long stretch. I'm hoping that more kids will eventually make that easier, but we're expecting twins now, and I'm a bit terrified of when they're both in that 15-24month phase, but hopefully it'll settle after that.

Also, if you can, try to get a break. Mothers helper a couple of times a week, babysitter, dad takes toddler for a few hours on an evening or weekend, etc. Parenting a toddler is very draining, you need some recharge time.

And as someone else said, if you truly are unhappy being a SAHM, try something else! Sometimes dreams aren't as great in reality as they are in our imaginations.
DecemberSun's Avatar DecemberSun 01:41 PM 07-02-2010
Everyone has great ideas already. This is what helped me...

By SARK:
(Found on a greeting card, and I edited it a little bit for myself.)
"Be there. Say "yes" as often as possible. Let them bang on pots and pans. If they're crabby, put them in water. If they're unlovable- love yourself. If they're not nice -YOU be nicer. Realize how important it is to be a child... Invent pleasures together. Remember how really small they are. Surprise them. Say "no" when necessary... Search out the positive. Keep the gleam in your eye. Encourage silly... Stop yelling. Express your love- A LOT. Speak kindly... Handle with caring. CHILDREN ARE MIRACULOUS!"

From 'Tao of Motherhood" by Vimala McClure:
"Pay attention and stay centered. You carry the mantle of 'Mother', the external principle of balance and stability. When your children's energy is scattered, be grounded. When your children throw tantrums, be still. Know what you stand for. Be firm and consistent to teach your children about boundaries. Thus you will root them in health, and release their souls to limitless."

I have these on my refigerator so I can read them if I ever feel frazzled. Stop. Breathe. And keep on truckin'.

You can't control her. You can only control how you react to her.

Don't buy junk food. Keep plenty of fruits out on the counter (in her sight) for snacks, and keep offering the veggies at every meal. She'll eat them. My kiddos loved dipping sauces at that age- it's messy, and fun, and a good way to get veggies and fruits into them. Apples or celery in nut butters, carrots in salad dressing, strawberries in yogurt or chocolate, veggies or pita chips in hummus, etc. Finger foods where they can use their hands make mealtime more like playtime. If you are a good influence with what you eat, that helps too. Also, meals don't have to look "typical" on a child's plate. We have a huge family and everyone prefers different stuff. Load up on the stuff they like and don't force the stuff they don't.

Pretend someone's watching you. I know it sounds stupid, but it really helped me a lot. I had to put on my "fake" smile and use my preschool teacher-y voice with my kiddos when they were on my last nerve. It works! They really respond differently when I change *my* attitude.

Get outside, and into the sunshine. We might not be getting bored staying close to home every day, but the children will. Even if you get out of the house for an hour, it really helps to break up the monotany of the day. There are lots of things you can do for free- explore your own yard, take a walk, go to the park, go to a lake or river and feed the ducks, go to a pet store and pet the animals, walk around the mall if it's too hot outside, go to a friend's house, etc.

Try to get at least an hour every few days completely to yourself. Whether it's taking a bath in private (what's that?), doing the grocery shopping, gardening, whatever. I really need some quiet time when I can just *be*. Some people don't need that time at all, but I really do feel "recharged" when I can get away, if even for a little while. When I come back I feel refreshed and ready to start anew. My soul needs some tending from time to time, and then I feel stronger and ready to "take on" my challenges.

As someone who has struggled with depression and the demands of being a SAHM to small children, I would suggest making sure you take care of yourself. Your daughter needs you to be healthy, and to have energy. I take multivitamins and Omega 3s, as well as eating (mostly) right, and moving around. It was hard to take that first step and get off the couch and MOVE, but I felt so much better for it, and my kids responded so positively I couldn't help but want to continue improving myself and our relationships. I really was amazed at how positively they responded to my changes. (They still do!)

s Hang in there! Toddlers who feel secure enough to assert their independence are doing so because they know they are in an environment full of unconditional love. So, in some ways, tantrums and disobeying are good things! Try not to look back on what she "did" yesterday, or even earlier this morning, to upset you. Move on and try to make every interaction a learning experience for both of you. And remember that you're not the only parent who said "I'm never going to..." or "My kids will always..." Things change! We live, learn, adapt, and go from there.
Pookietooth's Avatar Pookietooth 04:48 PM 07-02-2010
to you mama. Is she nursing less than before? I ask because I'm thinking that it may have triggered some hormonal changes in you that may have lead to postpartum depression. Toddlers are tough, and really, being a Sahm is not easy, but I would be careful about your emotions -- have you done any of the online ppd quizes? There is a special forum here devoted just to ppd if you have any questions.
ambersrose's Avatar ambersrose 07:27 PM 07-03-2010
Try to remember that no one is perfect. I have found that the parents who feel their child is perfect have a harder time dealing with their children when they start developing more of their own personality. Also, 18months-24 months is a very hard age. I agree with a PP that a schedule should help fill your days with more of the things you dreamed of doing as a SAHM. Also try to find a playgroup so you both can get some socialization.
Nazsmum's Avatar Nazsmum 10:54 PM 07-03-2010
May I suggest going to a LLL toddler meeting or Holistic mom's meeting. It is good to meet moms that are like minded. Maybe meet a friend at the park.

Hang in there it will get better.
reezley's Avatar reezley 05:48 PM 07-06-2010
Sounds like you've been ambushed with an almost-2-year-old! If she had been a more high-maintenance baby then you would have had time and a more gradual learning curve for the energy and constant maintenance that babies and toddlers can require! My first was high-maintenance - I had to be on my toes, talking, redirecting, watching, redirecting, convincing, explaining, bouncing, walking, etc. etc. when he was a baby. So I think the toddler years didn't surprise me too much. (For ds2 he was easier plus I didn't have time to think about it all so much!)

Try to take a step back and reset your expectations. Your toddler's personality is coming through and she's ready to take on the world, with opinions, wants, curiosity, not quite enough language to express it all. Things calm down a lot by around 3 years old. (There are challenges at every age, but it does get less intense.) For now, expect to be teaching her all the time. Think "she's still learning to ____ (talk not scream, keep her food on the table, ask not whine, etc...!!), I'll show her how".

Do you have a toddler-proof place at home, where there aren't many rules - where throwing a ball is ok, where touching everything is ok, where climbing is ok? And, at that age she may be starting to need more activities - playdoh & cookie cutters, cars, blocks, magnadoodle, new books, sandbox, obnoxious talking alphabet toy that plays songs, whatever! Rotate out familiar toys and rotate in new (to her) ones. If you can set up new activities or toys every so often in the day, she (and you) may be too busy to get into the negativity so much.

Getting out of the house or outside every day (or a couple times) really helped me! Still does, with a 3 & 5 year old!
Best of luck, it's not easy, but it's never dull...... right??
htcamommy's Avatar htcamommy 01:21 PM 07-13-2010
I too had a perfect baby who magically vanished and became a hell on wheels toddler. Look its 105 outside and the ground is all nasty cause it rains everyday like we live in the amazon. You're cranky and she's stir crazy. I agree whole heartedly about letting her bang on pots and pans, take lots of baths, and even by that child a keyboard to bang on. I have curled up in a corner a time or two asking "what did I get into and how the heck do I get out of it". You wanted to be a sahm for a reason and I'm pretty sure it wasn't only because it would be fun. For me it was because I was the best caregiver my children could have. This includes disipline. No one will ever love my child enough to disipline them the way I want them to be disiplined. So you did it wrong. Ok well today you can do it right. Just take it one day at a time. It can get very overwhelming at this age to think that you have to do this day after day after day. Today you're not going to yell. Today you're not going to pop. Today you are going to limit her t.v. watching. Tomorrow isn't here yet so don't worry about it. Also have you been getting out with friends. Ditch the babe with the partner and go hang out with people who have something other than your baby to talk about!!! Even sahm's need to clock out.

P.S. If you wan't your child to eat healthy. Mop real good and then drop the food on the floor. They'll eat any darn thing off the floor
Chicky2's Avatar Chicky2 01:56 PM 07-13-2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by DecemberSun View Post
Everyone has great ideas already. This is what helped me...

By SARK:
(Found on a greeting card, and I edited it a little bit for myself.)
"Be there. Say "yes" as often as possible. Let them bang on pots and pans. If they're crabby, put them in water. If they're unlovable- love yourself. If they're not nice -YOU be nicer. Realize how important it is to be a child... Invent pleasures together. Remember how really small they are. Surprise them. Say "no" when necessary... Search out the positive. Keep the gleam in your eye. Encourage silly... Stop yelling. Express your love- A LOT. Speak kindly... Handle with caring. CHILDREN ARE MIRACULOUS!"

From 'Tao of Motherhood" by Vimala McClure:
"Pay attention and stay centered. You carry the mantle of 'Mother', the external principle of balance and stability. When your children's energy is scattered, be grounded. When your children throw tantrums, be still. Know what you stand for. Be firm and consistent to teach your children about boundaries. Thus you will root them in health, and release their souls to limitless."

I have these on my refigerator so I can read them if I ever feel frazzled. Stop. Breathe. And keep on truckin'.

You can't control her. You can only control how you react to her.

Don't buy junk food. Keep plenty of fruits out on the counter (in her sight) for snacks, and keep offering the veggies at every meal. She'll eat them. My kiddos loved dipping sauces at that age- it's messy, and fun, and a good way to get veggies and fruits into them. Apples or celery in nut butters, carrots in salad dressing, strawberries in yogurt or chocolate, veggies or pita chips in hummus, etc. Finger foods where they can use their hands make mealtime more like playtime. If you are a good influence with what you eat, that helps too. Also, meals don't have to look "typical" on a child's plate. We have a huge family and everyone prefers different stuff. Load up on the stuff they like and don't force the stuff they don't.

Pretend someone's watching you. I know it sounds stupid, but it really helped me a lot. I had to put on my "fake" smile and use my preschool teacher-y voice with my kiddos when they were on my last nerve. It works! They really respond differently when I change *my* attitude.

Get outside, and into the sunshine. We might not be getting bored staying close to home every day, but the children will. Even if you get out of the house for an hour, it really helps to break up the monotany of the day. There are lots of things you can do for free- explore your own yard, take a walk, go to the park, go to a lake or river and feed the ducks, go to a pet store and pet the animals, walk around the mall if it's too hot outside, go to a friend's house, etc.

Try to get at least an hour every few days completely to yourself. Whether it's taking a bath in private (what's that?), doing the grocery shopping, gardening, whatever. I really need some quiet time when I can just *be*. Some people don't need that time at all, but I really do feel "recharged" when I can get away, if even for a little while. When I come back I feel refreshed and ready to start anew. My soul needs some tending from time to time, and then I feel stronger and ready to "take on" my challenges.

As someone who has struggled with depression and the demands of being a SAHM to small children, I would suggest making sure you take care of yourself. Your daughter needs you to be healthy, and to have energy. I take multivitamins and Omega 3s, as well as eating (mostly) right, and moving around. It was hard to take that first step and get off the couch and MOVE, but I felt so much better for it, and my kids responded so positively I couldn't help but want to continue improving myself and our relationships. I really was amazed at how positively they responded to my changes. (They still do!)

s Hang in there! Toddlers who feel secure enough to assert their independence are doing so because they know they are in an environment full of unconditional love. So, in some ways, tantrums and disobeying are good things! Try not to look back on what she "did" yesterday, or even earlier this morning, to upset you. Move on and try to make every interaction a learning experience for both of you. And remember that you're not the only parent who said "I'm never going to..." or "My kids will always..." Things change! We live, learn, adapt, and go from there.

This is the best post I've read in a long time. What a wonderful, patient mother you are. And your children are obviously going to benefit from your attitude. You are the mom I strive to be. Thank you for this post.


Quote:
Originally Posted by htcamommy View Post

P.S. If you wan't your child to eat healthy. Mop real good and then drop the food on the floor. They'll eat any darn thing off the floor
Tee-hee! That is so funny. And so true!
Megamus's Avatar Megamus 11:42 PM 07-13-2010
Oh, I am SO glad I found this thread! I have been at snapping-point for DAYS, and I just had a really terrible conversation with my mom where she basically implied "here are all the mistakes you made to get in this state, but Gee, I think you're an awesome mom."

I was feeling like I was the only mom in the world who thought to herself "Man, I just do NOT want to do this any more." Definitely not with more than one kid (cue the grandparental horror), and possibly not even with this one. Thank you, OP and PPs for making me feel a little better after a truly hideous evening. I have taken notes and look forward (almost) to trying again tomorrow.
mamazee's Avatar mamazee 11:59 PM 07-13-2010
Sometimes it's easier with toddlers if you find one place to go each day, not for too long but just to get a change of scenery with them.

Also, I'd take her outside and chase her around there a bit when she gets wild. I know it's work, but it seems to make things easier afterward when they've been able to get some of that out of their systems.

I agree about trying to improve the eating, because that makes a bigger difference in behavior that we sometimes think. I remember the lightbulb moment when I started feeding dd #1 eggs for breakfast instead of cereal. That one change made a massive difference. That child needs protein in the morning. Try some different food options, all healthy, and see what works best for you dd.

Another thing is that sensory play helps a lot of kids. Get something out that she can get messy with. Put her in the bathtub to do it if the mess will be overwelming. You can make homemade finger paints she can paint the tub with, and then give her a bath. Or just a bath with a small amount of water during the day for play. Some rice to run her hands through. A sandbox. Something like that might help her calm down.

Don't feel bad about finding it difficult. I waited 7 years to have a second child, and there's a reason for that.

It isn't easy, but the good news is that the particular stage you're in is temporary, and that there are ways to make even this stage better. Hold on!
lucky_mia's Avatar lucky_mia 01:13 AM 07-14-2010
It is the age.

I loved the infant stage, even with twins, but that second year nearly did me in. I swear I aged 5 years during that year. I have a funny book on my nightstand called, "I Was a Really Good Mom, Before I Had Kids." It has all kinds of funny things like mothers admitting that their child's first word was "Shrek". It is not exactly AP but when I read it, it made me feel much better.

Hang in there mama, you are not alone.
becoming's Avatar becoming 08:38 PM 07-21-2010
I love love love DecemberSun's post. I am taking so much advice just from that one little post.

I also wanted to add that 20 to 24 months is truly an *extremely* hard age. One of the hardest, in my opinion. Not old enough to do all the things they think they can & not old enough to fully express what they want/need a lot of the time. Very difficult. Hold on just a couple more months. 2 isn't as bad as everyone says
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