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#1 of 43 Old 06-05-2009, 01:14 PM - Thread Starter
 
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The neighbors keep bringing home my dog. She looks for any and all exits from the house and runs immediately down the street to a block of 3 houses where there are always kids outside. She has US inside! Why does she constantly run over there??? She's a pit mix, so I'm worried that we're going to get into major trouble for her doing this. The neighbors all just bring her home and often, I hear the neighbors yelling "Fergie" and sure enough, I look out the window and see her out there running around happy as can be.

I can't keep my house constantly closed up worrying about her running down there. She's always been an inside dog, but I find that I keep her locked up either in the backyard or the garage all the time lately. As soon as I let her into our house, it doesn't take long for someone to bring her back home from down the street. It's embarrassing and it makes me so angry. It makes me want to hook her up to a tree! I have 4 kids running in and out and I just can't expect that if she's in the house, she won't escape.

What would you do? Is there some way to keep her from running out of the house?

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#2 of 43 Old 06-05-2009, 01:36 PM
 
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, but I find that I keep her locked up either in the backyard or the garage all the time lately. ?
we have a *runner* as we call her. Honestly it sounds like she is craving attention and physical interaction (i e playing and running around outside) From your post you mentioned she runs to the neighborhood kids down the street. Our dog is mainly inside but is allowed outside in our fenced yard. We have found that if we take her with us when we go for walks and DH runs with her almost daily it helps get some of that enrgy that is pent up in her. We use a retractable lead so she can go can explore what she sees. This has helped a lot plus we found that she really needs to rough house around a bit everyday even though we are here all day with her she really stills needs to play (btw she is not a young dog)
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#3 of 43 Old 06-05-2009, 02:34 PM
 
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Why are you mad at your dog, you are failing to be a responsible pet owner. I am not understanding why it is difficult to keep your inside your home. Is she getting out doors, windows, large holes in the side of your house

Not only could your dog hurt someone or an animal (intentionally or not) she could easily be hurt herself poisoned, shot, hit by a car etc. Situations like this are why towns pass BSL, your irresponsibility has the potential to affect everyone, even responsible owners who mange to keep their dogs secure and indoors. If your dog has to be relegated to the garage and yard and you cant keep your dog secure re home it.
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#4 of 43 Old 06-05-2009, 03:32 PM
 
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It sounds like your dog is bored and if she is spending time in the garage (!!) or backyard alone she is most likely lonely and desperate for human interaction. Really, the dog isn't the problem here. Sounds like the humans in this equation can use some training and prevention tips.

A nine year old and a seven year old are old enough to have some responsibility around remembering to keep the door closed. Is it possible to set up a gate before the door? So a kid would have to open and close the gate then open the door.

Have her drag a leash so she is easier to catch when it does happen. Work on her recalls and commands so she is better trained.

But don't get angry at her. Think about how you want her to act or the behavior you want to modify, and then devise a family plan to help her learn to act that way.
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#5 of 43 Old 06-05-2009, 03:37 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Why are you mad at your dog, you are failing to be a responsible pet owner. I am not understanding why it is difficult to keep your inside your home. Is she getting out doors, windows, large holes in the side of your house

Not only could your dog hurt someone or an animal (intentionally or not) she could easily be hurt herself poisoned, shot, hit by a car etc. Situations like this are why towns pass BSL, your irresponsibility has the potential to affect everyone, even responsible owners who mange to keep their dogs secure and indoors. If your dog has to be relegated to the garage and yard and you cant keep your dog secure re home it.
You either don't have lots of kids running in and out, or don't have a determined dog. Your "advice" isn't helpful and is awfully judgmental considering that I'm coming here for ideas. And besides, who's going to want a 3year old pit mix, no matter how sweet she is. re-home? Yeah, right. But thanks for your insightful and thoughtful response.

Luv My boys...she is a very energetic and loving dog. She was raised with another dog and then given to us. We had a puppy for awhile and she was a completely different dog when she had her partner, but they ate our chickens and we gave away the newer puppy because of it. We've considered getting a small (non=chicken eating) dog to keep her happy, but I'm afraid of compounding the problem and after seeing a chihuahua chase a chicken the other day, I"m not sure that another small dog would be ok around my chickens.

I've considered a shock collar, but I'd have to be aware of her running out, and if I was always aware of that, I wouldn't need a shock collar. We could get an invisible fence, but we have a lot of concrete areas where she would be able to escape.

She likes to go places with us, but she gets carsick. We do take her with us when we can, though. We have an acre backyard, so we really don't walk her, but we do kick her soccerball for her a lot. I'm afraid that if I walk her around the neighborhood, it'll make her think to run farther when she escapes.

I think you're right though, there's something over there she wants. It might be their dogs, which for some reason don't ever leave their yards! She didn't run off when we had that puppy, come to think of it. We don't really roughhouse with her enough either. That's a good point.

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#6 of 43 Old 06-05-2009, 03:46 PM
 
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A shock collar won't help and will most likely make the situation worse. Most pet homes simply don't have the experience to use a shock collar correctly or fairly and often end up making a situaiton worse.

And walking her around the neighborhood won't make her run further away. Dogs do not exercise themselves in backyards. Walking her will only help your cause-she gets to spend quality connected time with her humans.

What kind of training have you done with her? What commands does she know? There are no miracle dog training tips-fixing ingrained behaviors take time and effort.
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#7 of 43 Old 06-05-2009, 03:49 PM - Thread Starter
 
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It sounds like your dog is bored and if she is spending time in the garage (!!) or backyard alone she is most likely lonely and desperate for human interaction. Really, the dog isn't the problem here. Sounds like the humans in this equation can use some training and prevention tips.

A nine year old and a seven year old are old enough to have some responsibility around remembering to keep the door closed. Is it possible to set up a gate before the door? So a kid would have to open and close the gate then open the door.

Have her drag a leash so she is easier to catch when it does happen. Work on her recalls and commands so she is better trained.

But don't get angry at her. Think about how you want her to act or the behavior you want to modify, and then devise a family plan to help her learn to act that way.
I put her in the garage when I'm busy in the house and yard so that she doesn't escape, like if I have to keep the gate open, of if there are too many kids here to expect her to stay put...it's a huge garage, not an abusive situation, but you're right...a boring place to be. Not to worry, it's not often or for very long. We're always here though (SAHM, homeschooling) and most of the time, she has complete access to us.

Writing and reading this thread, I am seeing that it's the dog/dog interaction that she wants. Now, I have to figure out how to give that to her. When we visit a friend who has a dog, Fergie sleeps for the whole day afterwards because of all that rough play.

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#8 of 43 Old 06-05-2009, 03:52 PM - Thread Starter
 
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A shock collar won't help and will most likely make the situation worse. Most pet homes simply don't have the experience to use a shock collar correctly or fairly and often end up making a situaiton worse.

And walking her around the neighborhood won't make her run further away. Dogs do not exercise themselves in backyards. Walking her will only help your cause-she gets to spend quality connected time with her humans.

What kind of training have you done with her? What commands does she know? There are no miracle dog training tips-fixing ingrained behaviors take time and effort.
She sits, stays, lays down, shakes. I don't think she's had any formal training but she only has 2 bad habits that I'd like trained out of her. She's too excited when people come to the door and this running off thing. She doesn't bark and if you're with her, paying attention, she doesn't run off. But the minute you turn your attention to something, she's off. That's why I can't do yard-work with her next to me.

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#9 of 43 Old 06-05-2009, 04:14 PM
 
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It sounds like she is not getting enough exercise and socialization - that's probably why she is so excited to interact with your neighbours. I would see if you can make it a family habit to go on some walks around the neighbourhood so she can get some new sights and smells - she is likely pretty bored.
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#10 of 43 Old 06-05-2009, 04:14 PM
 
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I would work on making coming back to you the best thing ever. So, I would work with her on a long line (a clothsline would work, any kind of light weight rope will do. I would stay away from nylon just because it can burn your fingers.) and simply practice her coming to you when you call. If she doesn't you can reel her in.

The thing with dogs and running is that running is fun so you need to override that. The longline will help her not be rewarded when she ignores you. When she comes to you really heap the praise and treats (or tug-something she LOVES) on her. Never ever punish her when she does come, even if during the training she gets loose and takes 15 minutes to come. EVERY time she comes back you when you call her must be met with ecstatic praise and show her how happy you are.

Here is a nice little guide about building a recall:

http://thrivingcanine.com/yahoo_site....229164336.pdf

That said you still need to understand that training will really help but management (for all the reasons you list) is still key.
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#11 of 43 Old 06-05-2009, 04:24 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I would work on making coming back to you the best thing ever. So, I would work with her on a long line (a clothsline would work, any kind of light weight rope will do. I would stay away from nylon just because it can burn your fingers.) and simply practice her coming to you when you call. If she doesn't you can reel her in.

The thing with dogs and running is that running is fun so you need to override that. The longline will help her not be rewarded when she ignores you. When she comes to you really heap the praise and treats (or tug-something she LOVES) on her. Never ever punish her when she does come, even if during the training she gets loose and takes 15 minutes to come. EVERY time she comes back you when you call her must be met with ecstatic praise and show her how happy you are.

Here is a nice little guide about building a recall:

http://thrivingcanine.com/yahoo_site....229164336.pdf

That said you still need to understand that training will really help but management (for all the reasons you list) is still key.
Thanks, that's a good idea. I'll go get a clothesline tonight and try that. I do scold her when she comes back or when I go get her We'll walk her too and maybe just the break of habit will help her need to get out less. I really didn't think that walking would make such a difference since she has so much room in our backyard, but since everyone is suggesting it, It's definitely worth a try.

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#12 of 43 Old 06-05-2009, 04:27 PM
 
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Have you ever made her shadow you? You put a leash on her, and you keep her right by your side as you go about your day. When this is too inconvenient you crate her, or confine her. The idea is to make her see you as the one to come to.

Personally, as long as she's not spending the majority of her time locked up, I don't see a problem with the garage (which is what I gather from your posts).

For the door, if she is expected to be with you (which is work for her), then you'll know she's not running out the door. And, I second the person who said a walk or run (or two) daily will also help your situation. I like my dogs to bond to me and the people in our house, so I cannot respond to the idea that a second dog will help. I always wonder if the second dog will double the problems I'm already having; it's not like the first dog is going to raise and train the second dog for me.
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#13 of 43 Old 06-05-2009, 05:23 PM
 
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My dog gets absolutely crazy if he doesn't get at LEAST 1.5 miles of walking in addition to random (5 minutes or less) play sessions per day. I know that its hard to make that time, but its been a blessing for my own body as well... now I'm really grateful that my dog forced me to make that hour during the day for his walks - we go early in the a.m. or late in the evening.

It really does sound like its just too much pent up energy for him to handle and regular releases of that energy for him could solve your problems. If you can't walk him or have regular play sessions with him, can your kids do it? Or maybe hire a neighborhood teen who needs some xtra spending money to walk him? Are there any dog parks around your area? These are a lifesaver for my dog too, b'c as much as I work with him, I'm not a dog!! And he needs to run around with other dogs too.

hth! Coming up with a plan/schedule that works for your dog and your family may take some creative thinking but there really is no way for him to "learn" by shocking him or trying to train him out of this issue. Poor guy probably (from your description of his "misbehavior") needs to exercise & play every day.

I'm totally writing this with compassion, its just my btdt trial & error wisdom I'm sharing. Best luck!

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#14 of 43 Old 06-05-2009, 05:30 PM
 
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It sounds like she is not getting enough exercise and socialization - that's probably why she is so excited to interact with your neighbours. I would see if you can make it a family habit to go on some walks around the neighbourhood so she can get some new sights and smells - she is likely pretty bored.
Bingo. And your 9 and 7 year olds should be more involved in her care -- she'll love the attention of them brushing/grooming her (even if it's not totally necessary) and build a long walk or two into their daily schedule (since you homeschool, this shouldn't be a problem). The exercise will be good for them, and it will tire her out so she'll be less likely to bolt during the day.

The other benefit to getting your kids involved: If they feel more responsibility for her, they're more likely to get the connection between remembering to shut the door/gate and having to go retrieve her. And they'll be more likely to notice she's gone, too! So it won't all be on you.
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#15 of 43 Old 06-05-2009, 06:13 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks for so many tips. I got way more than I expected. I'm much less angry with her and I think we can figure this thing out thanks to you're advice. I did just take her for a walk and the kids were just as excited as the dog. We may just have a new fun thing to do. I've never been much of a walker.

As for getting her with other dogs, there are offleash dog parks around here, but with her not consistent in coming back and having a baby and small child, I can't risk taking her. I'll try that clotheline trick as well as some of the other ones on the link and see if I can get her to be more reliable in returning.

Thanks again. I knew I could count on the MDC crew.LOL
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#16 of 43 Old 06-05-2009, 06:38 PM
 
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Oh that's so great!

Re: dog parks: Yeah, I can't let mine off the leash either (my other dog could go free, but this one's a runner!) so we have to take him only to dog parks that have the fenced in dog area. There may or may not be any of those in your area, but if there are, its a really cool thing to do. Its nice to be able to sit on a bench or whatever while the dog runs free with other dogs. Most of the dogs in the fenced parks near us are well behaved, but I always leave my dog's harness on just in case he needs to be grabbed quickly. Then he gets leashed again before we open the gate to leave. We're working daily on returning consistently, but he was living in a construction site when I found him, so he's used to doing his own thang or when he gets frightened by something he just bolts. Anyway, rambling here...

Thats awesome that your family has a new fun thing to do together!

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#17 of 43 Old 06-05-2009, 07:37 PM
 
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i'm confused? How does she get out of your house? A window?

We have a god-awful basset hound that truly tries to bust out of the house at any oppertunity... she hasn't succeeded and she's stealth and good!
And cats do try to get out the door too and haven't. So, I am guessing she's leaving out a window? put in a screen.
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#18 of 43 Old 06-05-2009, 10:52 PM
 
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How much exercise is this dog getting? Pits are smart dogs, how much mental stimulation is she getting?

A dog that is bored or won't get enough exercise will absolutely find ways to amuse themselves - this can include escaping or other forms of mischief. The dog also won't tire herself out by playing with her own toys. Someone actually has to play witht he dog.

Also, a dog will NOT (sadly, lol) exercise themselves when alone. So, being alone in the backyard is not considered enough exercise for a dog. Someone actually needs to get out there and play fetch with the dog.

If you can't do long walks, I suggest doing two games (on hour each) of fetch: one in the mornings and one in the evenings. In between that, I would work on training. Not just basics, but more advanced. A dog that is mentally and physically tired will be a good dog.

I have a very high energy dog - a GSD. They are also considered escape artists. As long as my dog gets enough 1. exercise, 2. mental challenges in the form of training - he is the best behaved dog in the world.

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#19 of 43 Old 06-05-2009, 11:26 PM
 
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OP, I know you posted that you've already begun implementing walks, etc. Plus I wasn't sure if posting the following would seem like someone trying to put guilt onto you, b'c thats SO not it, just wanted to throw another's perspective into the pot. But, we had to let our beloved older dog be put down this past wknd & altho our lovely girl was taken everywhere that other humans would legally (& sometimes illegally!) let us take her with us, we found ourselves kicking ourselves for all of the "could have, should haves" over this past week. It was her time, but we can't help thinking about those times that we were working (work from home) and would tell her to "go lay down" b'c we felt like we were too busy, etc. When all she really wanted from us was five minutes for a very quick walk around the block or a quick fetch session in the yard. Ugh. Again, NOT writing this to spread guilt, but rather to reframe it for you (if you want to hear it) before Fergie's playful days are over. They live such short & ultra forgiving & loving little lives. Please ignore this if it makes you feel uncomfortable b'c its just my own situation & regretful feelings of all the little five minute moments that I didn't take advantage of while she was still here with us. I miss her so dearly. I'd walk a thousand miles to be able to take her out for one more play session, truth.

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#20 of 43 Old 06-06-2009, 12:06 AM
 
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I agree with the exercise and training recommendations--even though I'm sure it's not what you want to hear.

I have two high energy dogs (lab/gsd & rescue gsd,) and while they do play together in our big backyard, they still need regular walks and training sessions.

It does take up a lot of time--but my experience is that it is totally worth it. My situation is maybe different b/c I live on a busy road, but I could not deal with the anxiety of having my dog running loose on a regular basis!

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#21 of 43 Old 06-06-2009, 12:45 AM - Thread Starter
 
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OP, I know you posted that you've already begun implementing walks, etc. Plus I wasn't sure if posting the following would seem like someone trying to put guilt onto you, b'c thats SO not it, just wanted to throw another's perspective into the pot. But, we had to let our beloved older dog be put down this past wknd & altho our lovely girl was taken everywhere that other humans would legally (& sometimes illegally!) let us take her with us, we found ourselves kicking ourselves for all of the "could have, should haves" over this past week. It was her time, but we can't help thinking about those times that we were working (work from home) and would tell her to "go lay down" b'c we felt like we were too busy, etc. When all she really wanted from us was five minutes for a very quick walk around the block or a quick fetch session in the yard. Ugh. Again, NOT writing this to spread guilt, but rather to reframe it for you (if you want to hear it) before Fergie's playful days are over. They live such short & ultra forgiving & loving little lives. Please ignore this if it makes you feel uncomfortable b'c its just my own situation & regretful feelings of all the little five minute moments that I didn't take advantage of while she was still here with us. I miss her so dearly. I'd walk a thousand miles to be able to take her out for one more play session, truth.
No, you don't make me feel guilty. Thanks for sharing. Fergie is an awesome dog and you're right, she's getting old fast. That's part of our issues. She's getting hip displasia and I feel that the reason for it is that she hasn't been as active since we gave away our puppy a year ago and then I got pregnant. We give her lots of attention, but I can see that we don't stimulate her enough.

The issue with training is money and time. Today, a friend offered a training program to me and I'm going to see what I can get from that. She's not a puppy and not much of a misbehavor, but she does love to train with us.

Thanks again
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#22 of 43 Old 06-06-2009, 12:49 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I agree with the exercise and training recommendations--even though I'm sure it's not what you want to hear.

I have two high energy dogs (lab/gsd & rescue gsd,) and while they do play together in our big backyard, they still need regular walks and training sessions.

It does take up a lot of time--but my experience is that it is totally worth it. My situation is maybe different b/c I live on a busy road, but I could not deal with the anxiety of having my dog running loose on a regular basis!
I'm fine with hearing that. When I started the thread, I thought I'd get some techniques, but didn't realize that she's understimulated. Through my words, you experienced dog owners saw it. She's my first dog as an adult, so I'm somewhat clueless.

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#23 of 43 Old 06-06-2009, 01:04 AM
 
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You can get some pretty good training or trick books pretty cheap. The obedience class I go to uses patricia mcconnells family dog training book as its text. I had read several of her books prior to this one, and this one is great too! Very simple, down to earth advice that is easy to incorporate into your life. You dont feel like you are actually training, ya know?

Also, does your dog like food games? There are different things that require the dog to manipulate or work to get food and treats out that can really help wear a dog out

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#24 of 43 Old 06-06-2009, 01:29 AM
 
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I really do feel for you. You've got a tough situation. A roaming dog is engaged in an activity that is self-reinforcing, and to beat that, you've got to be more wonderful than all the sights and smells out there in your neighborhood.

While exercise can only help (especially in this situation where it sounds like the dog is getting relatively little exercise and socialization), I really don't think that exercise alone is going to stop this behavior. Don't get me wrong. The other recommendations for exercise are great, but I don't think that "a tired dog is a good dog" mantra will really hold up in this case.

When you add training to the mix, I think a really important behavior to train in your case is an automatic sit at the door. I'd have a bowl full of Really Wonderful Treats right by the door and do a couple of two-minute training sessions every day. When the door opens, the dog sits and gets the Best Treats Ever (pea-sized tastes of hot dog, cheese, dried liver, chicken -- whatever is doggy heaven for your pooch). You want to get to the point that the dog just can't wait to sit when that door opens. Eventually you'll ask for longer sit-stays at the door, at an open door with you in the doorway, at an open door with you beyond the doorway, at an open door with you on the front lawn, etc. You are aiming for a sit-stay at an open door with you nowhere in sight. Remember, the treats need to be better than the outside world.

By the way, the sit-at-door behavior can also work to help her learn better manners when visitors are at the door too. The door opens; she sits. And hopefully, she'll stay sitting in order to get to greet the visitors.

Now, from a management perspective (because training and exercise alone aren't going to cure this dog), I really hope that you'll also train the people in the house to start closing doors. I know that this is a lot harder than training the dog. One thought I had was to install one of those light screen doors that swing shut automatically.

Back to the idea that your dog is leaving because she is bored or needs exercise - While I that may have been the impetus that brought on the behavior, I just want to reiterate that roaming is really, really self-reinforcing. For some dogs, it would never occur to them to leave their property without their humans, and they've never been given that opportunity. Once a dog is comfortable checking out the 'hood, they don't just decide to stay home if the opportunity to escape presents itself - even if home has become more fun. If home isn't MORE fun than the neighborhood, than the dog is still likely to roam.

This means that you have to train the dog what it's supposed to do when presented with an open door (sit to wait for a REALLY GREAT TREAT) and you have to close off the escape routes. On top of that, you also need to give the dog lots of exercise, because that's really great for a whole host of reasons.

Sorry this ended up being such a long post. I really do wish you lots of luck with this. You sound like you know this is not a great situation and you really care about your dog. It's really clear that you're also willing to put out the energy to make this better. I'm rooting for you guys.

Kelly
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#25 of 43 Old 06-06-2009, 02:13 AM
 
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wow, chaoticzenmom, YOU rock!

i have to say that you have been a most open and loving soul here. and, if i'm ever blessed to be a mother, may i be so receiving and loving of others' information and tips as you have shown possible to be here. you are gorgeous... my blessings to you. i wish to have a real life friend such as yourself someday, truth. sending soo much peace and positivity to you for the rest of your life now.

"When the external begins to define the internal, instead of the internal defining the external, one begins living as a mortal rather than as a universal being." ~ unknown
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#26 of 43 Old 06-06-2009, 09:34 AM
 
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I agree that you've gotten great advice about the dog, but you've got to crack down on those kids. Is there anyway to arrange things in your house so that they might have to go through a baby gate before they can get to the door? We have our basement baby-gated (or should I say dog-gated) off because it's the kid's playroom and they just don't pick up as well as they should and if our puppy gets down there she thinks it's the greatest thing in the world to steal their toys and chew them up. If you had the right kind of entry way you could baby-gate off the foyer and then the kids and dog would have two barriers. Now, granted, a baby-gate is not going to keep a determined pit mix from escaping. Our pup could easily jump it and I think the only reason she doesn't jump the gate to the basement is it's right at the top of the stairs. A baby-gate would slow Fergie down for a minute, though and remind the kids that they need to be careful about the dog.

When do you need the yard gate open outside? We have ours on springs like a screen door so they automatically latch themselves once opened. That might be an option for you, too.

Unfortunately, I don't think you're really going to be able to train her not to escape, you're only going to be able to make it less likely. The advice you've gotten on frequent walks, working on recall, training a sit by the door, is all spot on, but you're also going to have to make some changes to how the people go in and out the doors. We also have a puppy who would make a break for it if given the option. Our girls are very worried about her getting out, though, and would never open the door w/o an adult if she was right there ready to scoot out. Actually, I think our girls are a bit overly anxious about it at times, but they definitely don't let her out. I think that's really what's happening here — the people are letting her out. Maybe not on purpose, but they're allowing it to happen. If she was jumping the fence all by herself then I wouldn't say that, but presumably someone is opening a door or gate and she's scooting out.

Maybe there's a door elsewhere in the house you can just keep closed, like a kitchen door, so she can come in from outside to the kitchen, but can't get to where the front door is. We're keeping all our bedroom doors closed right now because our puppy will chew up toys and get up on beds and it's just better for her not to have the temptation.

Walking is great fun and great exercise. Hope you can continue with that and hope it helps with the roaming, too. Do try to train the people to keep doors and gates closed, though.

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#27 of 43 Old 06-06-2009, 10:53 AM - Thread Starter
 
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wow, chaoticzenmom, YOU rock!

i have to say that you have been a most open and loving soul here. and, if i'm ever blessed to be a mother, may i be so receiving and loving of others' information and tips as you have shown possible to be here. you are gorgeous... my blessings to you. i wish to have a real life friend such as yourself someday, truth. sending soo much peace and positivity to you for the rest of your life now.
Wow, that's a nice morning boost Thanks.

Beanma, Yes, I do have to crack down. I've got that wide open house that kids love to visit. I have 4 doors that lead outside. It's a task. This has only been happening for about 4 weeks, so it's a fairly recent thing. I admit, it's not only the kids that have to remember.

I talked with the neighbors (on our walk last night) and they're not getting mad. They all like Fergie, but they were glad to hear that we've got some ideas about how to get her to stop coming over there.

Our children make a study of us in a way no one else ever will.  If we don't act according to our values, they will know.~Starhawk Rainbow.gif  New  User Agreement! http://www.mothering.com/community/wiki/user-agreement

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#28 of 43 Old 06-06-2009, 02:22 PM
 
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We have an acre backyard, so we really don't walk her, but we do kick her soccerball for her a lot.
A yard is a big kennel to a dog. A dog...especially a big and energetic dog...needs long, long walks. Preferably several throughout the day. I know that may be difficult for you with children, but it is what a large, intelligent dog needs in order to be well behaved. Also, she needs mental stimulation. I'd go to the pet store and ask them for toys that keep dogs busy. A Kong comes to mind. I know Cesar Millan recommends putting your dog on a treadmill for 45 in the morning if you can't walk them two or three times a day.

Single mama to S ~ 6/09

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#29 of 43 Old 06-06-2009, 03:33 PM
 
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How does he get the dog to stay on the treadmill? That seems kind of boring for a dog... interesting idea. I'm getting ideas from this thread that I'd probably not have thought of. Definitely not have thought of a treadmill - and am imagining getting out of the shower to find our dog with his little stopwatch & sweat towel, running his morning miles!! Haha.

Chaoticzenmom, its true! Its awesome the way you're taking this info & not just being all defensive. Your dog's a lucky girl.

"When the external begins to define the internal, instead of the internal defining the external, one begins living as a mortal rather than as a universal being." ~ unknown
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#30 of 43 Old 06-06-2009, 04:48 PM
 
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WOW... no walks? First off, she needs walks. Daily. maybe one in the morning and one in the evening! I imagine if your dog could write she may have posted "help me, I'm so angry at my people" and that would have been appropriate for her too!

A dog is a furry kid. And I'm guessing your kids get more stimulation than a fenced back yard! Make it a family thing... everyone can come on the walks and explore the neighborhood!
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