Dog ate 3 oz very dark chocolate - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 10 Old 01-29-2010, 03:33 PM - Thread Starter
 
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So, my 100lb lab just ate my 90% dark chocolate bar. She ate 3 ounces. I know the darker the chocolate, the more toxic for dogs.

I've called my vet but, they're closed for lunch.

Anyone know what I should be looking for? or how bad this is?

I'm googling like crazy but, I was just hoping someone might have an idea.

Uggg......
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#2 of 10 Old 01-29-2010, 03:44 PM
 
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My totally uninformed guess is that your dog is big enough that he will be okay.

My cat ate a bunch of Easter chocolate once. He seemed fine at first, but then had problems standing up. He was trying to walk but dragging his hind legs. In his case, the vet explained that the theobromine caused his heart rate to speed up, and it wasn't pumping very efficiently (he had a heart murmur, too, so he may have had other issues with his heart). So his legs were not getting much oxygen and coudn't function properly. It was very scary, but the effects wore off pretty quickly, before we had time to think about having his stomach pumped. He was about 10-12 pounds and probably ate more than 3 oz total.

Most of the problems I have heard of with dogs have involved smaller ones.

Hope he's okay!

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#3 of 10 Old 01-29-2010, 04:25 PM
 
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Just a quick google gave me this:
http://vetmedicine.about.com/cs/nutr...latetoxici.htm

So let's say that your dark chocolate is equivalent to baking chocolate:
Unsweetened (Baker's) chocolate = 450 mg/oz
(that's about 10 times as strong as milk chocolate!)

You said 3oz so that's around 1500 mg of theobromine. Now that link says toxic dose is 100-200mg/kg but effects may be seen at as low as 20mg/kg. Your dog is about 45kg so 1500mg would give a ratio of 33mg/kg. Likely not fatal but could be bad. If it were me I'd induce vomiting with peroxide asap and call the vet to see what they say.

Crossing fingers for your pupper!
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#4 of 10 Old 01-29-2010, 04:31 PM
 
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you are right that dark chocolate is more serious than milk chocolate - link from -

http://www.talktothevet.com/ARTICLES...olatetoxic.HTM



We've all heard it, "Don't give your dog chocolate it will kill him". We'll how true is it you're probably wondering. Do I have to rush him to an emergency vet if he ate one of my M&M's?

The truth is chocolate contains theobromine that is toxic to dogs in sufficient quantities. This is a xanthine compound in the same family of caffeine, and theophylline.

Toxic Levels
The good news is that it takes, on average, a fairly large amount of theobromine 100-150 mg/kg to cause a toxic reaction. Although there are variables to consider like the individual sensitivity, animal size and chocolate concentration.

On average,
Milk chocolate contains 44 mg of theobromine per oz.
Semisweet chocolate contains 150mg/oz.
Baker's chocolate 390mg/oz.

Using a dose of 100 mg/kg as the toxic dose it comes out roughly as:
1 ounce per 1 pound of body weight for Milk chocolate
1 ounce per 3 pounds of body weight for Semisweet chocolate

1 ounce per 9 pounds of body weight for Baker's chocolate.

So, for example, 2 oz. of Baker's chocolate can cause great risk to an 15 lb. dog. Yet, 2 oz. of Milk chocolate usually will only cause digestive problems.

Clinical Signs

Xanthines affect the nervous system, cardiovascular system and peripheral nerves. It has a diuretic effect as well. Clinical signs:

Hyper excitability
Hyper irritability
Increased heart rate
Restlessness
Increased urination
Muscle tremors
Vomiting
Diarrhea

Treatment

There is no specific antidote for this poisoning. And the half life of the toxin is 17.5 hours in dogs. Induce vomiting in the first 1-2 hours if the quantity is unknown. Administering activated charcoal may inhibit absorption of the toxin. An anticonvulsant might be indicated if neurological signs are present and needs to be controlled. Oxygen therapy, intravenous medications, and fluids might be needed to protect the heart.

Milk chocolate will often cause diarrhea 12-24 hours after ingestion. This should be treated symptomatically (fluids, etc..) to prevent dehydration.

If you suspect your pet has ingested chocolate contact your Vet immediately! They can help you determine the the proper treatment for your pet.



back to me / my opinion - i would induce vomiting with peroxide and get that out of her belly asap.

mom to Andrew   born Feb 6th, already a mom to child with fur; and still missing and still wondering about the lost possibilities Mar 17, 2009
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#5 of 10 Old 01-29-2010, 04:38 PM
 
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My 30 lb dog once ate 8 oz. baker's chocolate. The emergency vet I believe gave her a charcoal treatment (this was 6+ years ago so I'm a little fuzzy on the details) but wasn't very optimistic. She had already started vomiting and several hours had passed since she had ingested it. Long story short, she made it, but it was a very rough night. Lots of diarrhea and vomiting and by morning she was foamy at the mouth and shaky.

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#6 of 10 Old 01-29-2010, 04:55 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you for your thoughts! I heard from the vet and they said that at 100lbs, 3oz of dark chocolate won't be toxic. Said it might cause diarrhea but to just watch her. At this point, she's completely fine. It's been almost 3 hours and she's active, not vomiting, no diarrhea etc... Uggg! This dog and her counter surfing, getting into cabinets etc.... I know it's my fault for having it in a cabinet she can get into but, seriously! Uggg......
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#7 of 10 Old 01-29-2010, 04:56 PM
 
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Honestly, in my several years as a veterinary assistant, I only saw one dog die of chocolate poisoning, and that dog was VERY sick before she ever got to the office.

Generally we'd give dogs that had eaten chocolate charcoal... which not only can make them puke, but it absorbs the toxins.

The vet I worked for thought the best method of delivery was for me to feed the dogs wet charcoal with a spoon. Let me tell you that trying to spoon feed a 100 pound lab charcoal is NOT easy. I speak from experience!

But, I think your dog will probably be okay. But definitely keep an eye on him, and call the vet when you can. You could also probably call the emergency vet nearest you for reassurance.

My parents' 35 pound border collie once ate two PANS of chocolate/peanut butter/oatmeal cookies, and it just caused a lot of chocolate puke.

That said, you have probably already figured this all out by now

ETA: I see we cross-posted. Glad everything looks good!

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#8 of 10 Old 01-29-2010, 05:13 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amcal View Post
Thank you for your thoughts! I heard from the vet and they said that at 100lbs, 3oz of dark chocolate won't be toxic. Said it might cause diarrhea but to just watch her. At this point, she's completely fine. It's been almost 3 hours and she's active, not vomiting, no diarrhea etc... Uggg! This dog and her counter surfing, getting into cabinets etc.... I know it's my fault for having it in a cabinet she can get into but, seriously! Uggg......
i understand

just a heads up - my lab mix (but only 50 lbs) ate some chocolate cookies over the holidays and while she was fine the first day she had baaaadddd diarrhea the next day and a half. so, don't be surprised if something still happens.

mom to Andrew   born Feb 6th, already a mom to child with fur; and still missing and still wondering about the lost possibilities Mar 17, 2009
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#9 of 10 Old 02-02-2010, 08:06 PM
 
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For future reference, you can fairly safely induce vomiting at home using hydrogen peroxide. Just inject a syringe full (about 10 ccs) into the dog's mouth, wait ten minutes, and repeat if the dog doesn't vomit. It is difficult and very unpleasant, but can be life-saving.
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#10 of 10 Old 02-02-2010, 09:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhiOrion View Post
Honestly, in my several years as a veterinary assistant, I only saw one dog die of chocolate poisoning, and that dog was VERY sick before she ever got to the office.

Generally we'd give dogs that had eaten chocolate charcoal... which not only can make them puke, but it absorbs the toxins.

The vet I worked for thought the best method of delivery was for me to feed the dogs wet charcoal with a spoon. Let me tell you that trying to spoon feed a 100 pound lab charcoal is NOT easy. I speak from experience!But, I think your dog will probably be okay. But definitely keep an eye on him, and call the vet when you can. You could also probably call the emergency vet nearest you for reassurance.

My parents' 35 pound border collie once ate two PANS of chocolate/peanut butter/oatmeal cookies, and it just caused a lot of chocolate puke.

That said, you have probably already figured this all out by now

ETA: I see we cross-posted. Glad everything looks good!
LOL why did he not give you a Syringe?...that is the best way for Activated Charcoal and Barium....

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