Bunny vet bills - Mothering Forums

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Old 09-27-2010, 02:08 AM - Thread Starter
 
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DS really wants a rabbit, and I'm all for it, but DH is worried about potential vet bills.

What is the highest vet bill your bunny has ever had? What do you generally pay a year in vet bills?

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Old 09-27-2010, 02:25 AM
 
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My friend had her male rabbit fixed, it was around the high $200's.

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Old 09-27-2010, 05:14 AM
 
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Bunnies must be fixed. With bucks, it stops the unsociable behavior - eg spraying and aggression. With does, it eliminates the risk of uterine cancer. A very high proportion of unfixed female rabbits die of cancer at a young age. Having said that, I pay around $50 to get bunnies fixed - there are low cost clinics in many cities that charge far less than a vet.

Re vet bills, you can avoid these if you know how to care for a bunny properly. Rabbits are sensitive creatures, and if you don't treat them right, they get sick and die very easily. Proper habitat and feeding is essential. Our rabbits are on a very strict food regime: small amount of quality pellets in the morning - the same brand without fail, no cheap pet store brands. Unlimited Timothy hay, day and night. A selection of correct veggies in the evening - at least three per day, organic if possible, if not, fresh and well washed. (We grow a lot of our veggies for the rabbits during the summer, which is fun for the kids, saves $$s, and very educational).

If you keep your rabbit outside, don't expect a long life. RAbbits are extremely heat sensitive and can die at the drop of a hat if they get over heated. They are also prey animals, so if they are outside, you could well find them dead in the morning after a predator came to sniff around the cage.

If you keep it in a wire bottomed cage and leave it alone for hours, don't expect it to be friendly and be a healthy, good pet for your child. For the best pets, keep them inside, and allow them out for exercise regularly. Our rabbits live in large exercise pens and the kids go in and play with them for several hours a day. They also get variety - they come to different parts of the house most days, and go in an exercise pen in the garden UNDER STRICT SUPERVISION on cool days.

Once you get the hang of rabbit care, it is easy and can be trouble free. Any sign of not eating or ill health, and you have to get to the vet pronto. Any delay usually results in a dead rabbit. We spent about $500 on a rabbit that got sick, before we learned all we know now about rabbit care. The rabbit still died. Now, we rarely go to the vet, and I can trouble-shoot most problems myself. Proper routine and feeding eliminates the most common cause of sickness, which is digestion problems.

Rabbits are great pets, but you can't put them in a cage and throw them some food once a day. They are as much as a commitment as a dog, and I think, more than a cat. Having said that, they are also wonderful pets. Ours are all real members of the family, and we adore them. They each have a very distinct personality, and give the kids a lot of joy. In fact, just yesterday my kids took two of our rabbits to a rabbit show where they showed them, then entered them in showmanship competitions, and even a costume contest. The kids spent hours making costumes -one bunny was dressed as a lion, the other as a bumble bee. They were so cute, sitting all dressed up and posed for the judges until they got their ribbons. They honestly thrive on attention, so if your kid is likely to lose interest, don't get a rabbit. They have as much personality as a dog, and they deserve great homes where they are given attention and appreciated.

Finally, there are thousands of rabbits in shelters needing homes. Please adopt one, don't buy one off an irresponsible breeder. That way you usually get them fixed, and they have had health checks. One of our best rabbits came from the humane society, and is a total superstar. He runs to the gate to greet you whenever you walk through the door, and will snuggle for hours with the kids.

Good link for rabbit info and care: http://rabbit.org/
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Old 09-27-2010, 10:32 AM
 
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Rabbit.org is a great place to find a rabbit savy vet. I have spent alot of money on my rabbits, I had a rabbit that had Mallaclusion and required getting his teeth cut every 4-6 week, when i had to put him to sleep it required diagnostics, overnight care, force feeding, and finally the Euthanasia and that cost me 700.00, my DH nearly hit the floor. Getting rabbits vet care can be costly because they are considered Exotic's, and right there you pay more,lol. You could look into pet insurance, might be worth it.
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Old 09-27-2010, 11:58 AM
 
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I wanted to add that in no way is my post a "dont get a rabbit post" lol. It is really hard to tell what you could spend on a rabbits care, i have three rabbits now that i have only had to do their spay and neuters and nothing else, and then my Sooty (RIP) i spent more on him then my three i have now. Generally you hope that you only have to go for yearly visits and nothing more. Of course there are breed type genetic things where different types of rabbits can be more susceptible to small face rabbits like lops, and netherland dwarfs can be more prone to teeth problems, Rex rabbits can be more prone to Sore hocks, and then they all can be susceptible to Statis (which is gas)
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Old 09-27-2010, 02:34 PM
 
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Our bunnies were cheap. Much cheaper than cats and dogs. Pretty healthy and lived much longer than expected. But ours were inside, litter trained and ran around the house at will for the most part.

If you don't learn how to clip their nails on your own that can probably add up. But they are easy to do - you just have to get them used to it.

Be warned, they will seek out and claim a/c vents. Bunny sleeping on vent = no air to that room. You are not allowed to move them, it will p!$$ them off. And bunnies, like cats, hold grudges.
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Old 09-27-2010, 02:35 PM
 
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Originally Posted by momto3bboys View Post
Getting rabbits vet care can be costly because they are considered Exotic's, and right there you pay more,lol. You could look into pet insurance, might be worth it.
Maybe it depends on your vet? If you find one experienced with bunny care it could be cheaper. I don't remember any upcharges for an exotic pet.
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Old 09-27-2010, 04:51 PM
 
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In this area it seems that exotic vets, this is a rabbit savy vet, are more expensive. something i would get done to my cat, would cost more getting it done to my rabbit. Over all the rabbits have cost me less then my cats over the years, but one visit for one thing can be expensive with an "exotic" animal.
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Old 09-28-2010, 04:19 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I've had bunnies before, but that was back in the '80s. I wasn't responsible for paying the bills at that point, so I just never found much about them. So I'm familiar with basic bunny care, but just don't know about average bunny vet costs.

I can clip the nails myself no problem, and I would check the teeth before I took on any bunnies to make sure there were no issues with mallaclusion (back in the '80s, mallaclusion was considered a lethal problem. Filling the teeth down was thought to be too stressful and painful to do on a regular basis and it was considered kindest just to put the bunny down. The only case I heard of where they filed a tooth down was on a bunny, who had basically good alignment, but had accidentally pulled one tooth out of alignment while biting his carrier in the car. It was felt that the problem was temporary and worth enduring a few filing treatments till the tooth returned to it normal position {which it did.})

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Old 09-28-2010, 04:59 PM
 
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Originally Posted by eepster View Post
I've had bunnies before, but that was back in the '80s. I wasn't responsible for paying the bills at that point, so I just never found much about them. So I'm familiar with basic bunny care, but just don't know about average bunny vet costs.

I can clip the nails myself no problem, and I would check the teeth before I took on any bunnies to make sure there were no issues with mallaclusion (back in the '80s, mallaclusion was considered a lethal problem. Filling the teeth down was thought to be too stressful and painful to do on a regular basis and it was considered kindest just to put the bunny down. The only case I heard of where they filed a tooth down was on a bunny, who had basically good alignment, but had accidentally pulled one tooth out of alignment while biting his carrier in the car. It was felt that the problem was temporary and worth enduring a few filing treatments till the tooth returned to it normal position {which it did.})

Mallo is no longer a death sentence, my minilop lived for a year and a half with it, my vet would cut his teeth every 4 to 6 weeks, i was going to have his teeth removed, i finally had to put him to sleep because he had a tumor in his stomach nothing to do with his teeth,lol. As far as knowing if a rabbit will get mallo you cant always tell, sometimes it takes a while for it to show up, and sometimes is cause by injury or poor diet. I had never heard of having a rabbits teeth pulled but a friend of mines rabbit has NO TEETH and was a happy , healthy rabbit, who was able to eat veggies , hay and pellets,lol.
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Old 09-29-2010, 12:49 AM
 
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bunnies are not good pets for children under 12. The skin tears. They can break their backs. They may bite if treated roughly. They can have heart attacks. I would not ever suggest a rabbit for a child.

regardless of my opinion on that... you need to make sure you have a vet that is experienced with rabbits. Otherwise you could cause more harm than good! Spay is about 100 and neutering about 40-60. In this country rabbits do not need vaccines. Rabbits are susceptible to tumors, hairballs, overgrown teeth, hair conditions, digestion issues. You can never know what will pop up...

aside from not needing shots, I'd say the rabbit is the same vet price as dog or cat.
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