Barking, barking, & even more barking - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 16 Old 07-22-2011, 08:27 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Our two poodle mixes bark all of the time in our back yard. They have outside access through a dog door, and, will run outside to bark constantly throughout the day. The triggers are typically neighborhood noises - passing cars, walkers, squirrels, etc. Another big instigator is the other neighborhood dogs - if one starts barking, ours just seem to have to join the party!
In another thread the use of a bark collar was mentioned, and, one poster stated there are alternate ways to bark train. I decided to post this thread to ask what training methods have you used to stop nuisance barking? Were you successful?

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#2 of 16 Old 07-22-2011, 10:17 PM
 
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Have you tried limiting their outdoor access to times when you can be out with them? And then as soon as they start barking get them inside? This is what we did with our dog, and now she is quite reliable about not barking in the back yard.
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#3 of 16 Old 07-25-2011, 12:49 PM
 
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I agree with the PP. Our neighbors had a barking, yappy little monster of a dog, and we complained frquently (it didn't help). So when we got a new puppy, there was no way we could let it bark outside!

 

As soon as he barked at something more than once, we brought him in - no exceptions. It got to the point where he would bark several times (usually at a person), and come running for the door - he knew the rule! Eventually he figured out that the way to stay outside was to stay quiet. Now he can laze around outside for hours - watching squirrels, bike riders, birds. As long as no one walks by with a dog, he's fine. He barks at dogs - and we bring him in right away.

 

So we haven't exactly taught him not to bark at all outside - nor would I want to, since parotecting his territory is part of his job (he's a Corgi, not any kind of guard dog). He gives one polite little bark when he wants to come inside - and he's smart enough to wait for us to get to the door before barking again.

 

If you have neighbors, I beg you to limit your dogs' outside time, and please don't leave them out of they're barking!


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#4 of 16 Old 07-25-2011, 05:23 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Unfortunately, we're surrounded by barking dogs. 3 of our neighbors have back yard dogs that constantly bark. greensad.gif
I agree, I don't want them annoying the neighbors - but, I find it annoying, too! When we hear them barking, we go outside and say no bark in a "I mean business" kind of way and immediately walk away - dh's idea, to give them no positive attn. for it. They do stop, but head right back out at the next noise. I'm saying them, but, realizing it's mostly one of the dogs that loves to bark. My next plan of attack is a squirt gun! Seriously.
More ideas welcomed!

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#5 of 16 Old 07-25-2011, 05:30 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I wanted to add, I'm hoping to avoid supervised outside time, but, am still leaving it on the table as an option. I love them having back yard access without our assistance.
I also can't bring myself to consider a bark collar, but, admittedly, also have not researched them.
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#6 of 16 Old 07-26-2011, 07:14 AM
 
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Have you tried a citronella collar?  We used to sell them at a previous animal hospital and received lots of positive feedback.

http://www.crd.bc.ca/animal/documents/CRD_BarkingDogs.pdf  this flyer has some good advice.  I like the idea of the radio playing in the yard to help desensitize to outside stimuli

 


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#7 of 16 Old 07-28-2011, 09:33 AM
 
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Oh Man.  Please do something.  We have a dog and she's indoors most of the time, but if she does bark when she's outside we bring her in.  Our new neighbors have 2 dogs that they leave outside the majority of the time and now, 5 out of 7 days a week, I'm awakened at 6AM because their dogs bark.  And bark and bark.  It's making me seriously cranky and I'm glad to be moving soon.

 

But they aren't trying to fix anything with them.  They go out and yell STFU at them.  They are lovely people. *sarcasm*

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#8 of 16 Old 07-28-2011, 11:02 AM
 
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don't flame me.  we have successfully used a bark collar with a particularly stubborn dog.  we tried other methods (shaking a can of rocks to startle, kenneling, etc) and nothing worked but the collar.  it works much the same way as the invisible fence collars that people use.  when the dog barks, it gives an electrical shock (though you can set it really low and it's not such a shock as a sensation, like the machines that are used in physical therapy.  i shocked myself with it, b/c i wasn't going to do something to the dog i had not experienced).  the dog really learns quickly not to bark, though, and probably (unless super stubborn) only experiences the actual shock 3 times maximum.  i did read some dogs get used to it and require turning it up or whatever but that didn't happen for us. 

sometimes though, if you love your dog and you don't want to rehome it, that can be the only option-- in a neighborhood where complaints are taken seriously, etc.  and the dog HAD to go outside sometimes, you know? 


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#9 of 16 Old 07-30-2011, 05:36 AM
 
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 the dog really learns quickly not to bark, though, and probably (unless super stubborn) only experiences the actual shock 3 times maximum.

 

This was our experience, as well. Our dog probably got shocked 3 times before he caught on. That was maybe 2 years ago, and he still understands that if he is wearing the collar, he better not bark. 

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#10 of 16 Old 07-30-2011, 06:28 AM
 
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The thing is IMO shocking for something they have NO idea is wrong, is, well wrong.  Dogs communicate by barking.  They have free access to outside they are going to go out and bark.  You have to teach them not to, yes, by supervising them and limiting their chances to bark.

 

Citronella collars are actually worse than shock collars.  The smell gets in their nasal passages and continues to "punish" long after the barking has stopped.  The shock is at least short and to the point...I just dont like the idea of not actually working with the dogs to teach them and show them what you do want.

 

Oh, and yelling "no bark" doesnt mean anything unless 1. they actually know what no bark means (which if it doesnt work, they dont ;) ) and 2. yelling or even just amping our emotions up actually encourages them barking...see, see, my human is upset too!  BARK BARK BARK...they are even barking with me!


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#11 of 16 Old 07-30-2011, 02:28 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tinuviel_k View Post

Have you tried limiting their outdoor access to times when you can be out with them? And then as soon as they start barking get them inside? This is what we did with our dog, and now she is quite reliable about not barking in the back yard.


This is exactly what I do. We don't have a doggie door though, our dogs are allowed in and out at will provided they are behaving. We are still training the German Shepherd puppy to learn when and how much barking is ok.  

 

We have the same problem with instigator neighbor dogs behind us.

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#12 of 16 Old 07-30-2011, 02:53 PM
 
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I didn't know that about the citronella collars.  I never used one but have wondered if we should have gotten that kind instead of the shocking kind.  

 

The shocking bark collar has been a great solution for us. When we first got our dog, he would bark incessantly throughout dinner (we'd put him in the backyard during meals because he was impossible around food---he's gotten a lot better about that, too. Thank you, previous owners shake.gif). I know it had to drive my neighbors nuts and I felt soooo guilty.  We got the collar, he got shocked about 3 times and then caught on. We started putting it on him every time he went outside.  Soon we were able to put him out without the collar. We also did the "call him in as soon as he barks once" thing, and that worked really well too. With both methods, we saw a change from a crazy constantly barking dog to a dog that only barks when appropriate--one or two barks at a passing dog, one or two barks at the doorbell, and major barking at the meter reader.  

Now, we rarely have to use the collar, but it comes in really handy when needed. If my dog has to pee at 6am on Saturday morning, I am not going to go out in my nightie and stand over him while he does his business.   I'll put the barking collar on him, let him out, let him in 10 minutes later, and take the collar off.  The fact that he doesn't know why he can't bark for 10 minutes is not important IMO compared to my neighbors' need for peace and quiet.   He is not a human infant, with a delicate psyche that will be damaged by a little correction. He's a dog that should be able to go outside unsupervised for a few minutes and not wake up the neighborhood.

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#13 of 16 Old 07-30-2011, 05:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Super Pickle View Post

   He is not a human infant, with a delicate psyche that will be damaged by a little correction. He's a dog that should be able to go outside unsupervised for a few minutes and not wake up the neighborhood.



The problem is, if used incorrectly, or for some dogs, even when used correctly, yes, it does major psyche damage.  The majority of dogs are pretty easy going and forgiving, but a really sensitive dog can develop major fear issues from one (many dont get why they are getting shocked and will associate it with being outside, or a certain part of the yard etc) or become reactive. 


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#14 of 16 Old 07-30-2011, 05:21 PM
 
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I can totally see that happening with one of my dogs if I used a shock collar on her.  

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#15 of 16 Old 07-31-2011, 04:35 AM
 
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I would let them bark during the day.I do bring my dogs in if they won't stop barking,but  I don't get huffy when I hear the neighboring yappers.Some dogs just like to bark.Now if it was all night then I would have issue with that!

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#16 of 16 Old 07-31-2011, 06:04 PM
 
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I would work on recall, and desensitize him to what is making the dog bark.

 

My dog used to bark in our yard, I'd call him, he'd keep barking, and I'd have to go get him and bring him in.

 

I addressed this annoying routine  by working on his recall. I practiced and practiced getting him to come to me, and gave him treats every time he did. 

I also would randomly give a really good treat, like a nice bit of leftover meat. Now he's quite reliable. There was a raccoon in the yard a few nights ago, and he didn't come, but it's rare that he doesn't.

 

So now my dog will bark, but as soon as I hear it, I call him, and he comes in.

 

Oh, and another thing I did was to get him to be calm around the things that were provoking the barking. I think you've got it tough, having your backyard surrounded by barking dogs, but maybe you could reward them with treats whenever they *don't* bark at the dogs, and maybe they'll start to calm down and not see those dogs as a trigger. 

 

I really get that it's a pain to have to supervise, but some time put in now could pay off later.

 

 


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