Anyone not vaccinate or selectively vaccinate their dogs? - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

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Old 11-06-2011, 08:17 PM
 
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females have a much higher rate of mammary cancers then males have of testicular cancer, the rates of testicular cancer dont raise exponentially like mammary cancer and pyometria do, so while it is beneficial to avoid females going into heat, leaving a male intact for longer doesnt have the same effects.


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Old 11-07-2011, 09:17 AM
 
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Spay and neutering for "health" reasons is a very gray area, you can trade one possible health risk (cancer is not inevitable) for another, and you also open yourself up to a dog with behaviorial issues, especially with pediatric desexing. With neutering, I do not believe the health "benefits", in any shape or form outweighs the negatives of not altering a male dog from a health prospective, you can't cut out the entire endocrine system and expect nothing to happen. Lonegirl if the vet practice you work for was in the UK there would be no routine desexing, it is largely only done for health reasons unless a client really wants it, and most people leave their dogs intact. And guess what, there aren't millions out of out of control dogs roaming the streets of Britain. And the interesting thing is dogs in the UK live an average of two years longer than in America. They are for the most part fed the same kibble diet, they are vaccinated, although less and no rabies shot which is probably the worst of the lot, the only difference between the canine population of both countries is the US routinely desexes animals and the UK does not.


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Old 11-07-2011, 10:34 AM
 
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Mirzam, doesnt that make the overpopulation problem worse?


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Old 11-07-2011, 10:47 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by starrlamia View Post

Mirzam, doesnt that make the overpopulation problem worse?



I don't believe there is a worse overpopulation problem in the UK than in the US, so the answer is no. Now, there is a great deal of evidence that there isn't actually an over population problem in the US either. But for the sake of this thread, I won't go there.

 

 

 


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Old 11-07-2011, 12:22 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Lonegirl if the vet practice you work for was in the UK there would be no routine desexing, it is largely only done for health reasons unless a client really wants it, and most people leave their dogs intact. And guess what, there aren't millions out of out of control dogs roaming the streets of Britain. And the interesting thing is dogs in the UK live an average of two years longer than in America. They are for the most part fed the same kibble diet, they are vaccinated, although less and no rabies shot which is probably the worst of the lot, the only difference between the canine population of both countries is the US routinely desexes animals and the UK does not.



Do you have any stats that there is less of an overpopulation issue in the UK? Just curious because I moved to the UK about a year ago, and maybe it's just the area we're in but people seem to be ten times worse with respect to breeding when they shouldn't be and overall responsibility with an unaltered dog. I know loads of people who breed their dogs "because they felt like it" and always see dogs wandering the streets at night. Add to that the fact that everyone lets their dogs off leash on walks...but again maybe it's just the area we're in, we're sort of in the sticks!

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Old 11-07-2011, 10:21 PM
 
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how is there not an overpopulation problem? Have you worked in the rescue industry? Im not sure how millions of animals being put to sleep every year doesnt correlate to an overpopulation problem... Where did this evidence come from? ... Ive read stuff from Nathan Winograd, and while he has a few valid points he fails to point out why shelters euthanize millions of animals every year, they simply do not have the room to keep them all, not just because (except in the cased of HSUS.. thats another can of worms), the fact is that there are more abandoned animals coming into shelters everyday then they have room for or can adopt out, and unfortunately they dont have nearly enough funding to keep them all. Esp since the recession in which adoption rates have plummeted. His "no kill" idealogy sounds good on paper, but until shelters can get adequate resources to be able to keep these animals while providing the exercise and stimulation they need, keeping them locked in kennels for years on end with little interaction or exercise is cruel IMO.



 

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Originally Posted by Mirzam View Post



I don't believe there is a worse overpopulation problem in the UK than in the US, so the answer is no. Now, there is a great deal of evidence that there isn't actually an over population problem in the US either. But for the sake of this thread, I won't go there.

 

 

 



 


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Old 11-08-2011, 07:55 AM
 
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I don't think the problem is overpopulation.  Honestly it's the people who buy and sell dogs like it's a fad.  They're lives real lives and I wish that it wouldn't be so easy for people to just discard them like they would their trash.  I almost think pet adoptions should be as strenuous as adopting a child.   No I"m not saying children and dogs are equal so don't bash me on that one I'm saying a life is a life and while I type this cow dog my best friend is sitting on the couch next to me checking out her painted toenails.  I have a hard time thinking anyone could have discarded her they way they did.  Too bad for them because she rocks!  If the mindset was changed on how important their lives were I'm quite sure "overpopulation" wouldn't be a problem. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by starrlamia View Post

how is there not an overpopulation problem? Have you worked in the rescue industry? Im not sure how millions of animals being put to sleep every year doesnt correlate to an overpopulation problem... Where did this evidence come from? ... Ive read stuff from Nathan Winograd, and while he has a few valid points he fails to point out why shelters euthanize millions of animals every year, they simply do not have the room to keep them all, not just because (except in the cased of HSUS.. thats another can of worms), the fact is that there are more abandoned animals coming into shelters everyday then they have room for or can adopt out, and unfortunately they dont have nearly enough funding to keep them all. Esp since the recession in which adoption rates have plummeted. His "no kill" idealogy sounds good on paper, but until shelters can get adequate resources to be able to keep these animals while providing the exercise and stimulation they need, keeping them locked in kennels for years on end with little interaction or exercise is cruel IMO.



 



 



 

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Old 11-08-2011, 10:02 AM
 
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RabbitMomma, I haven't had the same experience as you, I grew up in a small seaside town, my sister lives in the country in southern England and my brother lives in a market town in the midlands and when visiting them I also don't see packs of dogs roaming at night. I also asked the UK people on a couple of dog lists I am on and the same experience. 

 

As for the shelter issue, I don't believe it is any worse than the US, I know shelters in Britain take dogs from out of the country, Ireland and Cyprus being two places, so they must have space. The dogs from Cyprus are spoken for before they even hit UK soil. Now, I understand there are irresponsible people everywhere.

 

 

starrlammia, I am not going there with you. I understand why shelters feel they must desex their animals. I just wish they wouldn't do it to babies, that's all. And I agree with you Imakcerka, dogs (and all animals for that matter), are sentient beings and are entitled be treated as such.


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Old 11-29-2011, 06:40 PM
 
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I live in an area very rampant with parvo (as in..working in a vet clinic, we can see a few cases each week). I do the puppy vaccine series, booster at one year and then vaccinate OR titer every three years. I do not do kennel cough vaccinations unless we are boarding our pets.   My elderly dogs are not vaccinated. (they have a pet sitter come to our home when we're away) 

 

I DO follow the Jean Dodds vaccine protocol  for puppies of waiting until 9 weeks for the first vaccine. And when I have Rabies given, I don't combine it with any other vaccines on that day.

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Old 12-22-2011, 04:20 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Well our pup is here, and still unvaccinated. We have decided to wait until he is 10 weeks to start his vaccinations. Apparently Great Pyrs have been known to develop immune problems if vaccinated too soon. Thanks everyone for your advice and views, they were all really helpful. here's a picture of our boy :)

IMG_3543.JPG

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Old 12-22-2011, 10:43 AM
 
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oh he's cute, good luck with him! i hear they are a lot of dog.


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Old 12-27-2011, 04:47 AM
 
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I have one unvaxed and one vaxed.Would only do the rabies vaccine in the future as per state law. Cute pup!

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