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#1 of 19 Old 07-03-2005, 02:44 PM - Thread Starter
 
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We just adopted two mini dachshunds. They are four years old and brother and sister. We adopted them from the house they grew up in, not a pound.
I have never had little dogs before and so I am trying to get a handle on things. Shannon said not to carry them too much, because that will make them agressive. The little girl is 9 pounds and scared and trembly a lot. She hops up in my lap and wants to sit. My big dog walks over to her and she growls at him. She only does this while in my lap. Should I not allow her in my lap? What I have been doing is saying No Growl and then I put her on the floor. She immediately jumps back into my lap though.
Also, the boy jumps onto our furniture with his chew toy. He wants to bury his toy in someothing, and will destroy the couch if we let him. We gave him an old towel on the floor to use, which he loves, but he also wants to use the chair and couch sometimes. If we move it to the floor, he thinks we are just playing fetch. I have started putting it in a cabinet when he brings it on the couch. Just for a minute. I say "NO" and put it behind a closed door. He stares at the door and whines. I give it back to him and praise him for playing with it on the floor. DOes this sound like a good idea.
ALso, what should be my reaction to the girl when she gets scared? So far, I have been picking her up, but I think that is probably not a good answer. She does it both at home and when we are out in a crowd.
I have always kept my dogs off the furniture because of the pack order, but these guys automatically jump on the furniture, and really couldnt reach us otherwise. Is it okay to let them on the furniture? And, what is a good way to stop crazy excessive face licking?
TIA
Oh, and here they are, with Derek and Eli
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y87...s/136_3663.jpg
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#2 of 19 Old 07-03-2005, 02:56 PM
 
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just wanted to respond b/f I head out for a while.

I'm hoping some of the small dog owners will chime in as most of my experience is with the big dogs.


Me & DH hug2.gif , adult DD lips.gif & 7 yo DS guitar.gif . 2 GSDs, 6 rescue kitties, 4 birds & a gerbil.
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#3 of 19 Old 07-03-2005, 03:00 PM
 
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Yay! I love Weenies. We are lifetime weenie owners in my family.

Dachshunds have special training needs because they are smart but also STUBBORN.

When little girlie is scared, as cruel as this sounds, ignore her. When you pick her up you reinforce the behavior. Her growling at the other dog shows she has some pack misunderstandings and needs to learn that you are the pack leader. Dogs are never happy if they aren't sure where they fit in. Show all dogs equal treatment, KWIM? It will help both of them to understand where their territory is and where yours is. YOU are the leader so YOU are on the furniture. Stuff like that.

I would try allowing boy doggie his toy in a restricted area, like the kitchen, where he can't bury it. After a while he might forget he ever started that. There are these toys called Kong toys that have a space for you to fill it with peanut butter or cheese spray... fill it up and it will keep him busy.

More soon... dd is up...

Congrats on the weenies!

Amy: Certified Professional Midwife and mom to Max (11) and Stella (6).
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OMG - I looked @ the pics!! they are all cuties

Me & DH hug2.gif , adult DD lips.gif & 7 yo DS guitar.gif . 2 GSDs, 6 rescue kitties, 4 birds & a gerbil.
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#5 of 19 Old 07-03-2005, 03:58 PM
 
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Yep, what Sheena said--her fear and her growling are likely because someone has always picked her up. Ignore the fear, but at the same time, have her sit and praise her either with just your voice or a treat--this will help her gain confidence on the floor.
Don't let them on the couch unless you also intend to let your larger dog up too.
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#6 of 19 Old 07-03-2005, 04:00 PM
 
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hmm interesting, I never heard the theory that holding them too often would make them aggressive. I wonder if that's what made my little chihuahua so agressive, we had to find him a new home when dd was born because the way he reacted to her scared me.

did the person who gave them to you tell you the girl dog was always trembly like that? Or is it a new thing? If it's a new thing she's probably just getting used to her new surroundings and family. It should go away as she gets more comfortable. If it's just her personality then no amount of cuddling will make it go away. My MIL has a little dog like that.

I second the suggestion to limit the amount of space the boy has. They suggest this when house training as well. Get a baby gate and seclude him to a smaller portion of the house with you, as he earns trust you can make the space bigger and eventually give him full reign. If he tears up to the house go right back to giving him a smaller space to rule. He'll get the hint.
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#7 of 19 Old 07-03-2005, 04:00 PM
 
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Yes, any time she is sitting calmly and cooly praise her or toss her a treat. Dogs learn the absolute best from preventative postive reinforcement. Weenies can have special training challenges. How is their housebreaking?

Amy: Certified Professional Midwife and mom to Max (11) and Stella (6).
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#8 of 19 Old 07-03-2005, 05:25 PM - Thread Starter
 
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The woman said she is trembly.
She also was having trouble housebreaking them, bc she didnt have the time to devote to it. So far, they have been doing good with the potty for us, but this morning I went to the bathroom and shut the the door behind me. Lots of whining, and a puddle when I came out. They are crate trained and never have accidents when in the crate.
The boy is doing good learning NOT to get on the furniture with his toy. He hasnt tried it at all today. But, sometimes when he brings it to us, he will HOLD onto it like crazy. No growling, but he will not let go. What should I do about that? I am making sure not to let him win. But, what else besides praise and cheese when he lets go? Is that a sign of agression? DOminance?
The girlie definately WILL work for food. The boy will work for his squeaky toy. SO, at least they each have a motivator.
Shannon, if I choose to let them up on the sofa(as well as the big dog) will that cause dominance issues with the little dogs towards us?
We have started putting them in their crates while we eat bc they jump up onto our chairs endlessly during meals otherwise and with two of them, it is really hard to keep track!! They also sleep in there and do fine. I was able to leave them in the car in their crate yesterday while we went into the store and they didnt whine or bark at all. The woman who I adopted them from told me that she has not had the time to spend on training, and so thre are some issues. Over all, they are really good dogs. They hardly bark at all(amazing I think, after listening to the doxies next door to us carry on!) They dont chew up things and they seem to be a little low on the problem solving skills!
Shannon, about the carrying. Should it be never carry them or just limit the amount of carrying, or what?
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#9 of 19 Old 07-04-2005, 12:42 AM
 
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On the carrying--no you can carry them--just make sure they get plenty of time on their own feet on the ground. Obviously if they are in danger-pick them up (ie: big dog running at them, crowded area they would likely get stepped on, etc) but make sure they get from the living room to the kitchen on their own wee feet.
The fact that you have a motivator for both dogs and you've found it quickly means 2 things--1) they will be fairly easy to work with and 2) their drives for those items are high-otherwise, it wouldn't be obvious this shortly after getting them.
That they havnen't lived there long makes this the best time to lay down the law-they have NEVER known anything different from you or your home so it's not like you are suddenly changing the rules.
Honestly I wouldn't let them on the couch until things are established in the house and everyone's roles are clearly defined. Instead get them a raised dog bed-like a basket--so they are up off the floor and feel they have their own space. For some reason daxi's just seem to LOVE their baskets. In the basket, put some old clothes in there to lay on that smell like you.
To get him to release a toy-what you have now doesn't seem like an issue in that he probably has never been taught to release something on command. Teaching him this is easy actually. Choose a command-personally I use "out" but you can use drop it, or release--just make sure everyone in the house is using the same command. When you want him to drop the toy, take his collar, and lift it gently so you raise him to his tip toes-the dog can't swallow like this if his mouth is closes-so naturally he will drop the toy (usually fairly quickly) calmly repeat "out" until he drops the toy--the instant (and I do mean instant) he drops it-release the collar, praise him up and in the beginning give him a treat. One other thing to do is have him release his toy-give him the treat-then give him back his toy--often dogs don't want to give you what they have because they figure you won't give it back-obviously this is the case often if htey have something they shouldn't have-but by playing this "game" of taking the toy and giving it back after a treat-he will be more willing to give up his prize, thinking that he will get rewarded and he may even still have his prize. Anytime he drops something he shouldnt' have had on command-make sure you go get him his toy to give him in exchange.
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#10 of 19 Old 07-04-2005, 12:56 AM
 
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Get the book Don't Shoot the Dog. There will be some great pointers in it for you. You can get it a half dot com or maybe overstock dot com or maybe bookcloseouts dot com.

I have never heard that carrying around your dog will cause aggression. Hmmm...maybe ask your vet about that one. I have a friend who carries her little dog around with her everywhere (even has a sling for him) and he's the sweetest.
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#11 of 19 Old 07-04-2005, 01:08 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boysrus
The woman said she is trembly.
She also was having trouble housebreaking them, bc she didnt have the time to devote to it. So far, they have been doing good with the potty for us, but this morning I went to the bathroom and shut the the door behind me. Lots of whining, and a puddle when I came out. They are crate trained and never have accidents when in the crate.
The boy is doing good learning NOT to get on the furniture with his toy. He hasnt tried it at all today. But, sometimes when he brings it to us, he will HOLD onto it like crazy. No growling, but he will not let go. What should I do about that? I am making sure not to let him win. But, what else besides praise and cheese when he lets go? Is that a sign of agression? DOminance?
The girlie definately WILL work for food. The boy will work for his squeaky toy. SO, at least they each have a motivator.
Shannon, if I choose to let them up on the sofa(as well as the big dog) will that cause dominance issues with the little dogs towards us?
We have started putting them in their crates while we eat bc they jump up onto our chairs endlessly during meals otherwise and with two of them, it is really hard to keep track!! They also sleep in there and do fine. I was able to leave them in the car in their crate yesterday while we went into the store and they didnt whine or bark at all. The woman who I adopted them from told me that she has not had the time to spend on training, and so thre are some issues. Over all, they are really good dogs. They hardly bark at all(amazing I think, after listening to the doxies next door to us carry on!) They dont chew up things and they seem to be a little low on the problem solving skills!
Shannon, about the carrying. Should it be never carry them or just limit the amount of carrying, or what?

it does take a lot of time to housebreak small breed dogs since they have small bladders. We had a black lab and the chihuahua, the black lab was housebroken in a matter of days, the chihuahua had accidents for a long time. You just have to make sure you take them out often enough and don't give them water a couple hours before bed.

The holding onto the toy thing sounds like he wants to play tug a war but I think that leads to aggressive behavior so...
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#12 of 19 Old 07-04-2005, 01:33 AM
 
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Kator07, carrying a dog constantly causes issues for a number of reasons. First off, they are dogs, they have 4 legs and are very well equipped to walk, it's what they were designed to do, it's an inate behavior-being carried around is not.
Secondly, by carrying a dog around, you automatically incite his fight or flight behavior long before it may be put into action on the ground--because he's up in your arms, his ONLY option is fight-he cannot flee and he knows it. This causes dogs to act aggresively before they need to because they know they are small and they know they can't get away--so they try to look really scarey before anyone can challenge them. This is compounded by the owner who is holding the dog "comforting" him and shushing him and telling him "it's ok". Dogs do not understand comfort, they understand praise. So now the dog is inadvertantly being praised for his poor behavior. On the other side of that coin, you get the dog who figures he can take on the world because mom is protecting him all the time.
Simply put--it's not a natural way for a dog to live. Your friends dog may be the greatest dog in the world--there is nothing to say every dog who is treated this way will be a brat--it just increases the chances of it. I have a friend who is far from AP and has the sweetest gentlest little boy that ever walked--that doesn't make me want to put Molly in a crib just because it worked for her.

Btw, most vets know very little about dog behavior. Its absolutely not something that is ever focused on in school, so much of what they know is just from being around dogs-unfortunately many are around really bad a lot of the time too. My vet, I love him, he's a doll--but his dog is a big dumb jerk. He's obnoxious and spoiled rotten. He'll bite you if you turn your back on him. Fortunately Ross also admits that being a vet doesn't in any way make you an expert on dogs. I am still excellent friends with a vet I worked with when I was about 15, we still joke about the fact that when an aggresive dog came in, she used to call me back to deal with--she's petrified of dogs--and aggresive cats for that matter--she's an excellent veterinarian, she's beyond brilliant, but she's now working in research because she just really didn't like dealing with pets because she simply didn't know much about behavior.
I used to work with a vet who implied he knew all there was to know about behavior--he used to charge people $120 for a 30 minute behavior consult. Then while they were in the room, he'd come downstairs to my grooming area to ask me how you would deal with whatever situation was being presented--I thought he was just asking to help out a client--when I found out he was charging them for behavior consults--I starting giving him ridiculous "solutions" until he finally admitted to me what he was doing. We don't take behavior advice from our family doctors and we shouldn't blindly take it from vets either (sorry, this is a very sore spot with me)
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#13 of 19 Old 07-04-2005, 02:13 AM - Thread Starter
 
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does anyone have any good suggestions how to keep them off the furniture and out of our laps? I put them on the floor and they are back up in 2 seconds!! I do agree that they should be on the floor until we get it worked out. I will get them a bed. But, wow, they are so fast!!
Also, she really kind of lunged at my big dog today. SHe definately ONLY does it when she is up on hte couch and in a lap. I tried getting Samson (big dog) up on the couch first and then having her get up there. As soon as she gets up there, she starts growling at him. I tell her no growl and put her on the floor. She immediately jumps up on to the couch and started snapping and growling at the big dog. Samson might have growled a bit back(this all happened in less than thirty seconds) and then the little boy felt his sis was being threatened, so he started barking and snapping at Samson!! I put Lucy in her crate for a while after that!! But, there is a definate correlation between her being ina lap and lunging. She does hump her brother from time to time though, just in normal play. How exactly can I figure out what their pack order is? So, maybe she can just never be a lap dog?
Also, how many times a day do little dogs need to go out?
DO they need to be fed twice a day, or does a once day work?
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#14 of 19 Old 07-04-2005, 10:02 AM
 
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For now, just keep repeatedly placing them back on the floor--if you catch them mid jump, make a fairly loud growl and in a low voice say "NO, OFF" (not yelling, just low and growly) it should stop just with that after a couple days--if not, I can give you some other techniques.
I wouldn't say she can never be a lap dog--chances are she's never been properly shown who's boss--which is why she's being dominant with her brother (this is normal, the female is most often the boss) but being shakey with you--she's confused and doesn't know where she belongs. Much as she may see it as unfair--keeping her on the floor for a couple weeks is probably the nicest thing anyone has ever done for her--she'll learn her spot and then she can build up her confidence and she'll probably be an excellent pet--the ones that are bold enough to challenge for pack leader but soft enough to accept someone else without too much of a fight always make the very best and most trainable pets (IMNSHO)
Feeding, just do what you do for your other dog, I feed once a day here, but they get cookies when they come in after their morning pee. But there is absolutely nothing wrong with twice a day feedings (I would do that if I wasn't lazy--and my borders all get fed twice a day)
As for number of times out--probably just a couple more than your big dog, but in the beginning, get them out every couple hours just because the old owner had trouble with it. Hang some sleigh bells at the door you want them to go out--at nose level so that when they go to the door they will gradually learn that if they hit the bells with their nose, you'll come open the door for them. Most little dogs aren't hard to house break because they aren't smart--but because they are little, their actions to let the owner know they need to go are not as noticeable. Few dogs bark to go out in the beginning, but they can ring a bell.
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#15 of 19 Old 07-04-2005, 11:19 AM
 
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Weenies are NOTORIOUSLY hard to housebreak. We have had 3 little weenies in the family that basically never were 100% housebroken. I know it's not me because our Dane puppy housebroke in 1 week, lol.

As for the off the couch with the toy think, ITA with Shannon and I would add that you should go nutty with praise whenever he happens to be on the floor with his toy. Praise him up and toss him a treat and say "good floor toy!" or something like that that he can associate with his good behavior.

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#16 of 19 Old 07-05-2005, 02:02 PM - Thread Starter
 
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ok, so they do perfect on the housetraining thing UNLESS I leave them alone in a room for a minute!! I wewnt to the bathroom, came out and found a puddle. i was lying down with my ds last night, had one dog in with us, the other one out and the door shut, and he pooped.
SO, it looks like I will need to crate them or bring them into every room with me? How long can I expect that to go on?
We took them out to a festival yesterday and they did SO good!! They rode in a beach bag with a blanket on the bottom and the top unzipped. They rode in it like it was the most normal thing in the world. Ralphie even fell asleep in it! But, I had them walk a lot too.
Now, more questions: Ralphie will just stop walking and refuse to go on sometimes. SHould I assume he is tired and rest? Or should I nugde him on?
DO doxies pant when they get hot? I would have thought they would be hot, but they hardly panted at all!
WHat do you do about walking them and their getting tangle in their leashes? They have harnesses, but the harnesses rub their legs really badly and the collars make them step overthe leashes. I have seen better harensses, but they are $36 each!
Also, how do you deal with the doxie culture? I used to have an iguana and would take him for walks and I didnt get half the questions and comments then that I did walking these two. Everyone wants to talk about them, tell me about theirs, their mothers, or the one they had growing up. They stopped me to ask if they could pet them, etc etc. We were at a big event and actually wanted to do things there. We finally left and didnt do much, and one of the reasons was that we couldnt go ten feet without the total fawning. I understand they are cute, and since they are minis they are even cuter. Lucy looks like a pup, she is so tiny. But, how can I poliely say no to people when they ask if they can pet the doggies and we are in a hurry>
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#17 of 19 Old 07-05-2005, 02:09 PM
 
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You need to perfect not making eye contact and just keep watching like you didn't notice them about to ask you a question :LOL

On the housebreaking issues, it sounds like there is a bit of separation anxiety if they are separated from one and other or from you. Ignore the accident if it happens, do a bit more crate time and make sure that there isn't someone talking or touching them constantly. It's a new location and a new set of rules, it shouldn't take long to sort it out.
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#18 of 19 Old 07-05-2005, 02:26 PM - Thread Starter
 
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the funniest but most annoying one was this:
A girl, about ten years old ust laid down in front of us and started petting the dogs. I couldnt get around her, she was blocking my path. SHe didnt say one word to me. SHe asked the dogs if they were friendly(they of course said yes) and she sat with them for about three minutes, while her mom called her to the car and my family continued walking away. I finally forced myself around her and kept going.
Weird.'
SO, should I crate them each time I leave the room and shut the door behind me or not? I will work on getting people to ignore them more(HA) I am going to doing Brian Kilcommons' "grounding" with Lucy. Think that is a good idea? If you arent familiar with it, it is having her on leash all the time, right next to me, so she has to go where I go, paying less attention to her, having her work for all attention she does get, giving her more exercise, and doing lots of downs(the doggie equivalent to the army push up)
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#19 of 19 Old 07-05-2005, 02:44 PM
 
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Yep, that will work--just watch the kids don't trip over the tie down straps.

With the little girl--she should always wait for your response to "are they friendly?" and I'd have loudly pointed that out so her mother could hear--then say "you know, we haven't had them long, so I don't know"
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