My dog bit my 2yr old in the face - Page 3 - Mothering Forums
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#61 of 102 Old 03-28-2006, 07:37 PM
 
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Originally Posted by gratefulmum
And what do I do with the dog? She is a part of our family and we love her, but she bit our baby. How can we be sure that it won't happen again.
Would you get rid of your family pet if this happened????
I know how my son treats our dog, he's not always really gentle with her, but he's only 1 so he doesn't understand just yet. But all that aside, I don't care. My son is more important than the dog, she'd be out the door in an instant, I would probably have to shield her with my body to keep my husband from killing her if she ever bit James...

In Iowa hospitals are required by law to report dog bites, dogs get '3 strikes'. Our old puppy bit me on the face (accidently) and I had to get 3 stiches below my eye. A couple of months later my mom was playing with him and he bit her on the hand (her fault since she was wrestling with him) and she ended up with 5 stitches in her hand, the hospital told her that the dog now had 2 strikes, one more and the Sheriff would be at our house to dispose of the dog. Same thing happened to DH's parents dog, it kept biting and attacking people (but never got reported to the hospital) to the point where the neighbors were calling the sheriff almost daily to come have the sheriff put it down (they live on a farm) finally a neighbor kid went over and shot the dog himself. And, IMO, good riddence, that dog was a menace, it attacked anyone that walked near it. I wouldn't get out of the car if he was loose.

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#62 of 102 Old 03-28-2006, 07:39 PM
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Originally Posted by lab
Faith, I think you may be misunderstanding the point of pp. The dog may not be the offender. The child might be the offender. The dog may very well be the victim; and then have to pay with his life.
Sigh....I meant what I said, and I said what I meant about offenders and victims, whether it be of a dog bite, or being hit by a sibling, or being hurt by an adult. And if a dog is a victim rather than an offender-- I still mean the same thing. And I'm not retracting it. Because unlike so many, I haven't told the OP what to do with either her child or her dog. That's a decision for her to make. I simply said people ought to think about things from the victims point of view in general (and that's regardless of whether the victim is a dog or a child, really.) And that people ought to consider what message they are sending to the victim when they take action. And that many people (but not all) are hypocritical because they have one standard for the people or pets in their family, and a different standard for people and pets that are outside of their family. That means people in your family get to hurt you, and people outside your family are held accountable for hurting you. I think thats worth thinking about.

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#63 of 102 Old 03-28-2006, 07:43 PM
 
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Originally Posted by faithnj
I find it interesting that when dogs bite somebody elses child, usually the child is rushed to the emergency room, the owners get sued, and the dog gets put down and tested for rabies. But when one's own dog bites one's own child-- our own children are not given the same curtesy and care that a non-family member's child would get. The same with siblings. If a kid in daycare hits or bites your kid, then the violator get's reprimanded, and the parents are told to fix the problem or else. But if a sibling bites another sibling-- the victim often doesn't get the same amount of care. (And sadly to say, the same often goes for child molestation.) I always think it's unfair for kids to have to take the brunt of something because the offender was "in the family," so to speak. Why do so many think it's okay to leave your child in possible danger with a family member? But if it was the neighbor, or the neighbor's dog, then it's not okay?

Faith
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This wasn't a nip. The OP's daughter had to get stitches and a course of antibiotics. It would be irresponsible to continue to keep that dog around children.

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#64 of 102 Old 03-28-2006, 07:47 PM
 
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Originally Posted by aisraeltax
i hate to say this, but once an animal bites a babe, that animal can no longer be trusted. its different if there is an accidental scratch, etc. but a bite?
my ds2 got bitten by a pet German Shepard we had once (in the BUTT if you can believe that). but thats just my opinion.
BTW - it's shepHERD

this is absolutely UNTRUE from an animal view.
NOTHING could be further from the truth from training or animal behaviour

most NIPS are PROVOKED.
I've got 25+ years with dogs & training & less that 1% are a real bite 1st off & 2nd are unprovoked.

"If I see another picture of a kid laying on top of a dog... or hugging a dog around the neck (either of which dogs HATE) you'll all be able to hear me scream. ALL dogs bite.... that's how they say "enough", protect themselves when they're threatened, etc. Children aren't alpha (ever); children are littermates.... and dogs aren't stuffed toys or lounge-arounds. (No matter how 'cute' it might look in a photo.)
Today 03:52 PM "

excellent!

your pets are not playthings for your toddlers & should NEVER have to put up with any kid. They need their own space

"Faith, I think you may be misunderstanding the point of pp. The dog may not be the offender. The child might be the offender. The dog may very well be the victim; and then have to pay with his life."
EXACTLY

the adult should have been right there monitoring the situation &
BTW - Dogs communicate WITH THEIR MOUTHS !!

what happened EXACTLY?

I've had as many as 5 German ShepHERDS with my toddler. They are never backed into a corner, have an escape route, are never stepped on, bashed with a toy, etc PLUS I'm right in the middle of it.

soon as DS gets too rowdy, they go to the basement where they ARE SAFE !!

once incident & people are dooming the dog to death - very sad.
in my home, all are equal

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#65 of 102 Old 03-28-2006, 07:49 PM
 
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if your dog is a food protector - make sure you never have food & anyone in the area.

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#66 of 102 Old 03-28-2006, 07:53 PM
 
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Originally Posted by KristiMetz
Your post didn't say much about what was happening when your DD was bit, which makes quite a bit of difference.

However, I think that having ANY dog around children, especially todders, is a bit like having a loaded gun laying around the house.

I say this sincerely as someone with two dogs and a 2 year old.

Having dogs and kids together is a TON of work and for most people, it requires constant vigilance and a TON of training (the dog, the parents, and the kid!).

The fact of the matter is that virtually no dogs are "safe". Most any dog could bite a child if provoked enough. Your dog happens to have been provoked enough in this situation.

If you're going to get rid of the dog, do yourself a favor and blow off the whole pet thing entirely until you no longer have any children under probably 10 around.

If you aren't able to control the situation to an extent where everyone (including your dog) feels safe and secure, then that's probably the best option. I think there are so many variables that determine that (your home, the dog, your child, all kinds of things) only you can determine that.


(bolding mine)

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#67 of 102 Old 03-28-2006, 08:01 PM
 
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I'd get rid of the dog.

We have a golden retriever that I've had since college. Sweet, sweet dog. He knows our toddler ranks above him. Even still, I supervise ds around him, and we have taught ds how to nicely pet the doggy. If he ever snapped at or bit our son, I would be finding him a new home.

We had a rescue greyhound for a few years. She was 2 when we adopted her and about 5, when we had to rehome her. We did not have any children yet. Over a period of about 6 months, she started to become more and more aggressive. She started by snipping at other dogs (unprevoked) and then about took off my hand one day (again, unprevoked). We were working with her, trying to get her to calm down. A few months later (I was 7 weeks pg with ds at this point), she tore into our neighbor's dog's face (yet again, unprevoked). We were on the sidewalk with the dogs leashed. They usually played together fine. But, on that day our dog ran to the end of her leash and attacked the other dog. After voluntarily paying the $300 vet bill for the neighbor's dog to get stitches, we decided that there was no way we could keep the dog at that point. I contacted a greyhound rescue facility and was completely honest with them about why we needed to find her a new home. While it was emotionally draining for dh and I, it was the right thing to do. I cannot imagine how things would have been, if we had kept her around to wait and see how it would go after ds was born.

Also, my ILs have a cranky, geriatric golden retriever, which has pretty much been neglected its whole life. He will snap at ds, if ds gets within 10 ft of him. After the first time this happened, I made a rule that their dog was to NEVER be in the house, when ds was visiting. Well, a few months ago, stepMIL 'forgot' and let the dog in. He snapped at ds again (2nd time ever, and ds does not provoke the dog). If it were my dog, there's a good chance that it would be living with my mom or someone else that I could trust to keep it away from small kids. Unfortunately, I have to put up with ILs.
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#68 of 102 Old 03-28-2006, 08:07 PM
 
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several posters have told of incidences where their or other dogs they know bit or attacked "unprovoked." It's important to remember that dogs operate on a totally different system than people- the acuteness of their senses are different and they interpret things differently. So- it may have been "unprovoked" to your human senses, but i bet there was something that provoked the dog. That's why i think it's so important that people do some reasearch, consult trainers, etc...when something happends.

There's a book called _The Other End of the Leash_ that is really excellent in explaining things from a dog's perspective. The woman who wrote it works extensively with agressive dogs. It's a good read.

I am a homeopath, offering acute and constitutional consultations for children, babies, and parents. Long-distance treatment is easy, either phone or skype! I also am certified to offer Homeoprophylaxis, a vaccine-alternative program. Message me for more details. www.concentrichealing.com
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#69 of 102 Old 03-28-2006, 08:09 PM
 
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I love animals as much as anyone, but if it were me, the dog would be finding a new home. I just couldn't take the chance of something worse happening.

My husband's son from his first marriage was bitten by his grandparent's dog when he was 12 months old. The dog had been the family pet for years, had never bitten anyone before, and the bite was totally unprovoked. He bit the baby on the ear and nearly tore it completely off. They had to rush to the hospital and baby had to have surgery to have his ear reattached. The grandparents immediately had the dog put to sleep. The baby is now 18 years old, and he is still afraid of dogs and has been his whole life.
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#70 of 102 Old 03-28-2006, 08:12 PM
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Originally Posted by polka123

"Faith, I think you may be misunderstanding the point of pp. The dog may not be the offender. The child might be the offender. The dog may very well be the victim; and then have to pay with his life."
EXACTLY
Well, despite the fact that all I did was ask a question about the hypocrisy of having one standard for dogs, children and adults outside of of one's home, vs. a different standard for the ones inside one's home," it seems that I have pushed quite a few buttons. Seems like some get nervous whenever it sounds like a person might even be SUGGESTING that a child receive more consideration or protection than a dog-- even if that's NOT what has been said. (After all, if you follow that logic, then I'm also saying kill the siblings and other family members too, right?) I don't know to make of that. I almost wish I had been among those who suggested the OP put her dog to death--- just so that I could understand what the hullabaloo is about. But since I didn't suggest that-- I really find the concern over my saying we parents need to consider victims rights when we make our decisions, quite....interesting.

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#71 of 102 Old 03-29-2006, 12:30 AM
 
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If the dog is territorial about food, first and foremost make sure she can eat her meals in a non-threatening (to her) environment - protected from kids and others. Prevention is key, and that requires supervision of both kids and pets.

Our Labs were raised as guide dogs for the blind (both were "career changed" early on) and one went on to do pet therapy at a hospital pediatrics ward. She obviously had to pass some strict tests before she could do that. She has an amazingly tolerant temperament but I still keep a watchful eye on the dogs when our kids take an interest (they're 2 and 3 years). They've been taught from day one to respect the animals (not going near their food, not pulling on body parts, etc) but still the kids interact with them, put blankets on them, whatever. And when the dog has had enough, she licks the kids (that's enough to stop them!), or just leaves. The dogs also know the kids out-rank them in the pack. One way we do this is to let the kids give the dogs commands, such as "sit", and put down their food bowls for them, then walk away and say "OK" to release them from the sit to eat. This way, the dogs recognize the kids' authority (food is very important to Labs) and the kids learn respect for the dogs' space. Dogs are very much aware of each family member's position in the pack and gentle reminders about their place is important.

By the way, I grew up terrified of dogs due to a couple of 'close calls' (not bites) with dogs as a young child. I know what it's like to be afraid of these animals. It was well into my 20s when I decided I needed to jump in the deep end and get a dog so I could get over this fear. I honestly thought I might drop my own child in my fright around a dog and didn't want to risk that (although now of course I realize the power of maternal instinct!). Raising puppies to be guide dogs taught me so much about these wonderful animals and about myself. They are part of the family and you have to examine a whole lot of factors before you can decide how to handle a situation like this. Can you increase supervision? Can you provide separate safe areas? Can you get training help or evaluation of the dog? No one else can decide what's best for your family and your dog.

Good luck with your decision.
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#72 of 102 Old 03-29-2006, 03:31 AM
 
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Originally Posted by SMUM
One point...some dogs won't bite no matter what children do to them, the child can pull on the tail, get into the food, etc. and the dog won't bite. Therefore, if a dog does bite, regardless of the behavior of the child, the dog is "in the wrong"...and since he is a dog, not a human, and capable of inflicting extreme harm, and even death, he should be put down, regardless of how loved.
Wrong....just, wrong.
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#73 of 102 Old 03-29-2006, 12:37 PM
 
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[QUOTE=momma2emerson]I'd get rid of the dog.


We had a rescue greyhound for a few years. She was 2 when we adopted her and about 5, when we had to rehome her. We did not have any children yet. Over a period of about 6 months, she started to become more and more aggressive. She started by snipping at other dogs (unprevoked) and then about took off my hand one day (again, unprevoked). We were working with her, trying to get her to calm down. A few months later (I was 7 weeks pg with ds at this point), she tore into our neighbor's dog's face (yet again, unprevoked). We were on the sidewalk with the dogs leashed. They usually played together fine. But, on that day our dog ran to the end of her leash and attacked the other dog. After voluntarily paying the $300 vet bill for the neighbor's dog to get stitches, we decided that there was no way we could keep the dog at that point. I contacted a greyhound rescue facility and was completely honest with them about why we needed to find her a new home. While it was emotionally draining for dh and I, it was the right thing to do. I cannot imagine how things would have been, if we had kept her around to wait and see how it would go after ds was born.

[QUOTE]

Sounds like your grey had a thyriod problem. Greyhound rescue is completley different than any other rescue out there. They will take your dog back NO MATTER WHAT and find an appropriate home. Unfortunatly this is not the case for most rescues.

For all those who wonder why rescues and some shelters don't adopt to families with small children this thread exemplifies the reason three fold. There are to many people who expect dogs to take whatever children do to them, those expectations are unrealistic. So far I see a bunch of folks who have gotten ride of their dogs (or would) for things that could be worked through. Kids get older and grow out of chasing and pulling tails, you just have to be more careful while they are in that stage. We have given the OP suggestions and asked questions with little to no response from her. So at this point we are just bickering back and forth. The issue of dog snaps(bites) and kids will never be resolved so if you don't think a dog should snap, no matter what, do society a favor and NEVER get one.
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#74 of 102 Old 03-29-2006, 02:59 PM
 
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If your dog has food aggression, then why wasn't it put away when it was eating?! I only ask that because I have a dog that is food aggressive. We feed him ONLY in his crate! From doing that, he has actually become less aggressive because he knows that we aren't going to take his only food away from him. He ONLY gets like this when it's his food dish. I can take him and pull him away if he got into our food but when it's HIS food, he's VERY protective of it. So, like I said, he gets fed away from anyone or our other dog.


Anyways, I don't know your entire situation but I'm so sorry that your babe got hurt. This situation must be really hard on you. I hope you can find a solution that will be best for you all! Good luck!
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#75 of 102 Old 03-29-2006, 04:22 PM
 
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IT.....IS.....A.....DOG!!!

I am so sick of people projecting human additudes and emotions onto dogs. The dog goes away. PERIOD! If I can't find a friend that's interested in taking the dog then it's "Old Yeller time".

You might be sad at the memory of having to get rid of your dog but it beats hell out of the soul stripping pain of your child being hurt or worse.

When the child/children are older and can understand what the do's and dont's of having an animal are and can defend themselves then get one.
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#76 of 102 Old 03-29-2006, 04:38 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Moose
IT.....IS.....A.....DOG!!!

I am so sick of people projecting human additudes and emotions onto dogs. The dog goes away. PERIOD! If I can't find a friend that's interested in taking the dog then it's "Old Yeller time".

You might be sad at the memory of having to get rid of your dog but it beats hell out of the soul stripping pain of your child being hurt or worse.

When the child/children are older and can understand what the do's and dont's of having an animal are and can defend themselves then get one.
breathe...just...breathe.......
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#77 of 102 Old 03-29-2006, 09:16 PM
 
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You know who's fault it is that dd was hurt?

The supervising adult.

ALL dogs have a point at which they will snap or bite. It is foolish to think otherwise or take a dog for granted. Having a dog and small children in the same house is a huge responsibility. I do NOT allow my dd to threaten or harrass my dog, period. Constant vigilance is a drag, but I love my family and its worth it. If dd is feeling especially rowdy or if I can't pay close attention, the dog spends a little time outisde or on the other side of a baby gate.

I do think the OP should consider rehoming the dog unless her family is willing to change the way they handle the dog and child. I have a close friend who adopted a lab, and let her toddler get too rough. She walked in one day to find the lab with the girl's head in his mouth. Terrifying, but the babe was unhurt. My friend did some soul-searching and talked with professionals, and instead of kicking the dog out they changed the house rules. The dog is a terrific dog who was put in a bad situation by the adults. A dog who isn't being protected has to decide when to protect himself, and that is a failure of leadership on the owner's part.

Training and supervision. Training and supervision. Training and supervision.
Repeat x 100.
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#78 of 102 Old 03-29-2006, 09:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Moose
IT.....IS.....A.....DOG!!!

I am so sick of people projecting human additudes and emotions onto dogs. The dog goes away. PERIOD! If I can't find a friend that's interested in taking the dog then it's "Old Yeller time".

You might be sad at the memory of having to get rid of your dog but it beats hell out of the soul stripping pain of your child being hurt or worse.

When the child/children are older and can understand what the do's and dont's of having an animal are and can defend themselves then get one.
What is amazing to me is that this is a NFL board.

People on this board educate themselves when it comes to circ, breastfeeding and spanking?!?!? But don't do a bit of research when it comes to what is a healthy, happy environment for dogs and kids.

Trying to do the right thing with three kids and a hubby. 
ds20, dd18, ds16

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#79 of 102 Old 03-29-2006, 10:41 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Dechen
You know who's fault it is that dd was hurt?

The supervising adult.

ALL dogs have a point at which they will snap or bite. It is foolish to think otherwise or take a dog for granted. Having a dog and small children in the same house is a huge responsibility. I do NOT allow my dd to threaten or harrass my dog, period. Constant vigilance is a drag, but I love my family and its worth it. If dd is feeling especially rowdy or if I can't pay close attention, the dog spends a little time outisde or on the other side of a baby gate.

I do think the OP should consider rehoming the dog unless her family is willing to change the way they handle the dog and child. I have a close friend who adopted a lab, and let her toddler get too rough. She walked in one day to find the lab with the girl's head in his mouth. Terrifying, but the babe was unhurt. My friend did some soul-searching and talked with professionals, and instead of kicking the dog out they changed the house rules. The dog is a terrific dog who was put in a bad situation by the adults. A dog who isn't being protected has to decide when to protect himself, and that is a failure of leadership on the owner's part.

Training and supervision. Training and supervision. Training and supervision.
Repeat x 100.
Thank You!
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#80 of 102 Old 03-30-2006, 03:14 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Dechen
You know who's fault it is that dd was hurt?

The supervising adult.

ALL dogs have a point at which they will snap or bite. It is foolish to think otherwise or take a dog for granted. Having a dog and small children in the same house is a huge responsibility. I do NOT allow my dd to threaten or harrass my dog, period. Constant vigilance is a drag, but I love my family and its worth it. If dd is feeling especially rowdy or if I can't pay close attention, the dog spends a little time outisde or on the other side of a baby gate.

I do think the OP should consider rehoming the dog unless her family is willing to change the way they handle the dog and child. I have a close friend who adopted a lab, and let her toddler get too rough. She walked in one day to find the lab with the girl's head in his mouth. Terrifying, but the babe was unhurt. My friend did some soul-searching and talked with professionals, and instead of kicking the dog out they changed the house rules. The dog is a terrific dog who was put in a bad situation by the adults. A dog who isn't being protected has to decide when to protect himself, and that is a failure of leadership on the owner's part.

Training and supervision. Training and supervision. Training and supervision.
Repeat x 100.
I *never* leave my child alone with other people's pets, especially dogs. My mom has a dog that loves my son, but never ever have I so much as taken my eyes off of them when they are together. My son's safety is MY responsibilty!
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#81 of 102 Old 03-30-2006, 03:46 AM
 
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You know who's fault it is that dd was hurt?

The supervising adult.

ALL dogs have a point at which they will snap or bite. It is foolish to think otherwise or take a dog for granted. Having a dog and small children in the same house is a huge responsibility. I do NOT allow my dd to threaten or harrass my dog, period. Constant vigilance is a drag, but I love my family and its worth it. If dd is feeling especially rowdy or if I can't pay close attention, the dog spends a little time outisde or on the other side of a baby gate.

I do think the OP should consider rehoming the dog unless her family is willing to change the way they handle the dog and child. I have a close friend who adopted a lab, and let her toddler get too rough. She walked in one day to find the lab with the girl's head in his mouth. Terrifying, but the babe was unhurt. My friend did some soul-searching and talked with professionals, and instead of kicking the dog out they changed the house rules. The dog is a terrific dog who was put in a bad situation by the adults. A dog who isn't being protected has to decide when to protect himself, and that is a failure of leadership on the owner's part.

Training and supervision. Training and supervision. Training and supervision.
Repeat x 100.
Best post I've read in a very long time. I could say a lot more, but it probably wouldn't sound as polite.

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#82 of 102 Old 03-30-2006, 11:45 AM
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"I had the dogs before I had the baby."


Interestingly enough-- Dr. Phil is having a family on today with a similar problem. The family dog-- a deaf dalmation, bit their 18 month old child in the face. The baby required 20-30 stiches, and will need plastic surgery. The father wants to keep the dog in the house and train the wife. (Meanwhile-- the kid looks like she had half her face ripped off.)

I'm all for training dogs. I think it's more important to train humans to train and operate correctly around dogs. But frankly, I've seen very few adults who could adequately train their dog to sit or not jump on people, nevertheless not bite a child. I just don't know how many could then make the leap to being able to train their dogs to respect their young children as "alpha" family members, and not bite them. And considering how many people don't think they should teach their children to do things that don't come naturally to them, I can't imagine how many are willing to use the word "no" and "don't do that," when it comes to what the child does with a dog. I mean, what's the GD or non-coercive method for teaching your baby not to get in the dog's face? And last but not least-- behavior in dogs is partially a function of what breed the dog belongs to. What do you do if you have a breed that's basically incompatible with children? It's nice to tell people they ought to seek more training. But until I can see more people who can be successful at even the most basic of dog training-- I think people should do what they think is best when it comes to keeping their kids safe, whatever that is. And I refuse to blame anybody who chooses to keep their child safe. I just won't go there.

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#83 of 102 Old 03-30-2006, 12:37 PM
 
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Originally Posted by faithnj
It's nice to tell people they ought to seek more training. But until I can see more people who can be successful at even the most basic of dog training-- I think people should do what they think is best when it comes to keeping their kids safe, whatever that is. And I refuse to blame anybody who chooses to keep their child safe. I just won't go there.
I agree with this. Frankly, I know very few people that have been able to properly train their dog. It is all too common for people to have a dog that they keep outside, in the garage or basement (sad but true!) all day because it is "too wild" or "can't behave." There are people that could re-train a dog that has bit or shown aggressive tendencies, but I don't think that job should be recommended for everyone.
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#84 of 102 Old 03-30-2006, 12:53 PM
 
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Faith,

I agree that if a family can't make the commitments required to safely have a dog and a child, they should rehome the dog. Unfortunately, there are many dogs being rehomed or euthanized because of owners who lack a basic understanding of dog behavior. I guess I'm a sentimental person, but I think having a pet is a responsibility. They are beings, not objects. Yes, rehome if you have to, but do it after careful thought. Don't throw a dog out like trash.

I have always treated baby and dog interactions as a matter of safety - like running into the street. Any time my dd is close enough to touch the dog, I'm right there. I know very few GD parents willing to let a toddler run across the freeway.

Ideally, parents should be considering these safety issues from the beginning. I sympathize with your desire to keep children safe, Faith, but more kids would be safe if parents thought carefully about dogs and kids. Getting rid of a "bad" dog without reflection leaves open the possibility of getting a new dog and doing nothing differently. Too many people think only bad dogs bite or snap, that the right dog should be willing to take abuse from children. Its important to educate people that ALL dogs have a limit and should be respected as the potential danger they are.
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#85 of 102 Old 03-30-2006, 12:56 PM
 
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Look, to me it is quite obvious. I care about dogs, but they are not really a member of the family in the way that my daughters are.

I would get rid of that dog so fast your head would spin. Again, we have four dogs, I am not anti-dog, but I am pretty realistic. Our dogs are not permitted to be around our daughters without very very close supervision, and even then only our two elderly dogs without teeth that can bite are allowed with them.
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#86 of 102 Old 03-30-2006, 01:12 PM
 
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Getting rid of a "bad" dog without reflection leaves open the possibility of getting a new dog and doing nothing differently.
I see this happen a lot, and it's really sad.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dechen
Too many people think only bad dogs bite or snap, that the right dog should be willing to take abuse from children. Its important to educate people that ALL dogs have a limit and should be respected as the potential danger they are.
More importantly, people should know that there are no bad dogs, just bad training. Having a properly trained dog is especially important in a house with children, and of course children should be taught how to interact with the pets (cats are more unpredictable than dogs imho) in their house.

Sadly, I would not keep a dog that had bit my child on the face.
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#87 of 102 Old 03-30-2006, 01:56 PM
 
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I think a MUST read for any family with dogs and children is Childproofing Your Dog : A Complete Guide to Preparing Your Dog for the Children in Your Life. It's such an easy read and gives great tips for preparing your dog for life with children (and children for life with dogs.)

Our dog is wonderful with our children, but I always know that he has limits too and it's the adults responsibility to make sure the kids and dog are never in a situation that could turn dangerous.
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#88 of 102 Old 04-04-2006, 01:01 AM
 
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I had a similar situation when my dd was just over a year. Our dog had been showing aggression and we were working with a trainer ($300 for 3 training sessions, crazy expensive for us poor folks!!). It didn't work though, and he bit her in the face, completely unprovoked, my dh saw the whole thing. The dog had to be put to sleep. It was very hard, but even our trainer said we did the right thing. A dog that bites will most likely do it again, and it will be worse. That was exactly our situation, there was a definiate pattern of more aggression despite our best efforts. I was very sad, but I don't feel bad for our decision. We couldn't hand him off to someone, it felt like that would just be making someone else responsible for a future bite down the road. Keeping baby safe is the most important thing, and that most likely means not having the dog in the home.
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#89 of 102 Old 04-28-2006, 06:14 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by faithnj
Somehow I just doubt that the child who takes the bite really cares to distinguish between the family pet and somebody else's pet, after he's been biten in the face.

Pain is pain to a child-- whether it comes from the family dog or your family members, or from somebody else's dog and somebody else's kid.
I respectfully disagree. My kids have hit, pinched, and pushed each other. They don't get nearly as upset about it coming from a sibling as they do coming from a a playmate. The degree of familiarity you have with a person or animal does, to a significant degree, affect how you feel about being hit/bit/whatever.

That said, I have always told my dh that if our dog (his dog) ever bit our kids, the dog would be G O N E.

Namaste!
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#90 of 102 Old 04-28-2006, 06:39 PM
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Originally Posted by dharmamama
I respectfully disagree. My kids have hit, pinched, and pushed each other. They don't get nearly as upset about it coming from a sibling as they do coming from a a playmate. The degree of familiarity you have with a person or animal does, to a significant degree, affect how you feel about being hit/bit/whatever.

That said, I have always told my dh that if our dog (his dog) ever bit our kids, the dog would be G O N E.

Namaste!
Yeah, I guess you're right. When your own parents beat you, perhaps you don't feel as bad as when the school teacher does it, huh? I don't know. Whatever the case, the whole reason I said anything about this issue is because I really hate the amount of sibling abuse I see going on, and people let it go because it's siblings. If it was somebody else's kid beating your kid up in pre-school, well then something has to be done about it. But if it's a sibling, it's okay??? I don't get that. And I don't think it's fair. And I do know two people who were traumatized by their siblings. If you don't think it's okay for somebody else's kid to hit your kid, then why do so many people leave it to family members to "work it out?" And considering many people were telling the OP that even though her DD had to get stiches from the dog's bite in the face, I said if you are the type to take action when the neighbor's dog bites your kid and sends your kid to the hospital for stiches, then why is it okay for your own dog to bite your kid? It's just something to think about. [B]Don't be a hypocrite about it all-- this was my original point. I dont' care if the OP wants to keep her dog. And I don't care if she gives him up. I think she should do what's best for her family. But I still think my point about hypocrisy is worth thinking about.
Require the same for you and yours as you require from others.

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