My dog bit my 2yr old in the face - Page 4 - Mothering Forums
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#91 of 102 Old 04-28-2006, 06:49 PM
 
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I think the whole child should be considered. A zero tolerance policy concerning personal injury from a member or near-member of the family may not be something one wishes to model for children. Perhaps forgiveness, an acceptance of some risk as natural in life, an abundance of affection over fear and many attempts at resolution (problem solving) rather than immediate avoidance when facing difficulties might be attributes to demonstrate to the children.
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#92 of 102 Old 04-28-2006, 07:58 PM
 
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Wow.....

First off, I agree, nothing can be determined until the OP says what was happening when this child was bit.
Secondly, sorry to offend, but the OP failed this dog MISERABLY prior to this child ever being bit (which in my opinion means the family also failed the child) These issues were KNOWN, but instead of dealing with them, desensitizing this do to things "she doesn't like", they ignored this dogs cues, they pussy footed around her, co-existing with her but never actually making an effort to understand her and be her LEADER. My dogs don't get the option of "not liking this or that" if I see a signal that something bothers them, I work through it using positive reenforcment until the dog readily accepts what he "doesn't like" and sees it as an opportunity to get my praise or a treat, rather than an opportunity to nail a kid in the face.
I can't even describe how much I HATE hearing a client tell me "Well....Fido doesn't like it when...., so we just don't do that" Give me a freaking break--yeah it's a DOG, but doesn't he deserve your respect???

I have absolutely NO PROBLEM WHATSOEVER with speak of humanely putting a dog to sleep when all alternatives have been exhausted. I am NOT a fan of rehoming a biter--you created the beast--you deal with him, don't pass your problems on--and especially NOT without COMPLETE DISCLOSURE. I also don't have a problem if an owner sought out help but the professional failed them. My job as a dog trainer is to ensure I don't fail a dog or his family.

To the OP, I really do hope you consulted a professional trainer regarding this, this issues you described are actualy fairly easy to resolve, part with training, part with informing an owner of safety stratagies to avoid another problem.
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#93 of 102 Old 04-28-2006, 09:51 PM
 
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Originally Posted by faithnj
Yeah, I guess you're right. When your own parents beat you, perhaps you don't feel as bad as when the school teacher does it, huh?
Whatever. I know that you know I didn't mean that. Whatever issues you have about this, don't read into my comments something that assinine.
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#94 of 102 Old 04-29-2006, 02:13 AM
 
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To the OP, what did you end up doing?

We had a miniature schnoodle before our son was born. She started being aggressive to kids while I was pregnant. She bit a few of our friend's kids. We placed her through poodle rescue when my son was 4 months old. It was very hard. But she went to a retired couple, so I think it was a better fit.

When my son was 4 we decided to get another dog (we already had a very tolerant lab mix). She was a wild one and my son would grab her and bonk his head on her back (to stim-he has a mild autism spectrum disorder.) I tried everything to get him to stop. She bit him on the face a few times, but only the last time did she leave a mark. I knew I couldn't keep her. It was just too dangerous. I had that feeling in my gut that an earlier poster mentioned. So I gave her to my aunt who lives with a whole pack of dogs on acreage in the country. And she's much happier. While I was sad about placing my first dog, I was relieved about placing this one!

Now that my son is older, has more impulse control, and doesn't stim on dogs anymore, we foster dogs for a rescue organization. Only smallish to medium sized ones. And we are very careful. Aggressive dogs, for any reason, aren't welcome in our house.
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#95 of 102 Old 04-29-2006, 11:38 AM
 
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If there werent so many homeless dogs on the planet.....I think it would be a good thing if they instituted a licensing procedure.....mandatory training classes for potential dog owners BEFORE they buy a dog. Its a responsibility that alot of people just dont get until after the fact, and sometimes not even then.
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#96 of 102 Old 04-30-2006, 09:47 AM
 
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So, Gratefulmum, what happened?

This thread has turned out like I thought it would, like they always do here... into a huge debate. Since no one knows what really happened, its pretty much all conjecture, eh?

We had a rescue greyhound mix. The shelter did not tell us he had any sort of biting issues. He bit me when I gave him the "down" hand signal trying to train him, which I shrugged off as him having thought I was going to smack him. He bit Dh when DH dropped his napkin and moved quickly to retrieve it. Again, this was shrugged off. Then he leapt up and bit DD (who was 3 at the time) in the head as she walked by him. I was IN THE ROOM not 4 feet from them. DD was not touching the dog, looking at the dog, or running. There is no amount of supervision that I could have been excersizing that would have stopped this, other than me having the dog on the lead in the house near me at all times. Like everyone with kids knows, there is just no way you can supervise anyone 24/7. Accidents happen no matter how vigilant you are. She had to get a few stitches and has a scar on her eyebrow... thank God it was not her eye that he got. I took the dog back that afternoon and told them what happened. You know what? I got a call a few months later from a couple who adopted him... they got my number off the tag I had made for him.
The shelter did NOT tell them that he had a history of biting or aggressive behavior. I understand the dog is doing well in his new home with only adults, but the new owners did tell me he had snapped at them as well. I cautioned them, and hope that this dog does not do serious damage to someone else
I think that some dogs, like some people, are damaged beyond repair.

The Tabbie Family; DH , DS , DD , a few :, a couple : and me.
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#97 of 102 Old 04-30-2006, 12:05 PM
 
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Yeah, I wonder why the talk turned to blame. Is that really necessary? Doesn't every mom blame herself already when an accident happens? Instead of talk of blame, I think it should be viewed as a poor fit between dog and family. Or more specifically, dog and kid. It doesn't mean the parents are negligent, it doesn't mean the kid's a brat, it doesn't mean the dog's an aggressive monster. Sometimes, for whatever reason, it's just not a good fit.
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#98 of 102 Old 04-30-2006, 12:17 PM
 
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Would you get rid of your family pet if this happened????
Yes, without a second thought.
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#99 of 102 Old 04-30-2006, 01:29 PM
 
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did your ds approach her while the dog was eating?
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#100 of 102 Old 05-01-2006, 02:40 AM
 
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What Im wondering is how those of you who have owned "agressive" dogs have reacted to the agression? Brushing it off or ignoring it is only going to ensure that there will be more of the same. The dog feels that he has made you back down, that he is the pack leader... Absolutely a bad thing with a dog that has already shown that he isnt hesitating to show agression towards a human.

An instant, appropriate reaction is key. Depending on what the dog has done, maybe just a sharp sound - hey! ah! shh! - or maybe it has to go as far as putting the dog into a submissive position, down on his side, looking away from you, firm (yet not angry) pressure in the neck area the way a mama dog corrects her pups. Instantly and without hesitation. Dont release contact or allow the dog to get up until he has shown that he has accepted that submissive position and will stay there calmly.

With the right training, any human can be a good dog owner.
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#101 of 102 Old 05-01-2006, 03:17 PM
 
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I got bit in the face when I was like 2 or 3. this dog was also kinda 'cranky'. we didnt get rid of the dog. I just learned not to try to run up to her and give her a hug. I am not afraid of dogs now either.
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#102 of 102 Old 05-02-2006, 10:30 PM
 
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Excuse me, but I think I AM a good dog owner. Just because we could not deal with an aggressive dog (no quotes needed here) does not mean otherwise. Some dogs are agressive even with gentle correction, and better suited to other homes. I was raised around dogs, big dogs bred to be used in the police force and as gaurd dogs. We all had to learn hand signals and commands. Of course I was bitten, once. I learned quick not to hug a dog that did not want to be hugged, and a healthy respect for animals. I would never endanger my child by putting them in the way of an unpredictable animal.

Where is the OP? I bet she has been scared off. I hope the outcome was a healthy alternative for thier situation.

The Tabbie Family; DH , DS , DD , a few :, a couple : and me.
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