My dog is driving me crazy - Mothering Forums
Pets > My dog is driving me crazy
2Sweeties1Angel's Avatar 2Sweeties1Angel 03:15 AM 08-03-2006
I have a 1 year old Pomeranian and lately he's been driving me insane. We've been having heat advisories for the past few days and since his fur is really long and thick (he needs to get to the groomer but I haven't had time/money) I've been keeping him in a lot. He's going stir crazy because he's used to having free run of our property, and we have a lot of property. He has toys to play with, he has another dog to play with, and yet he's still aggravating me. Right now he's barking his little head off for no apparent reason. I definitely can't let him out now because it's after midnight, we live in the country, and there's a good chance he would be eaten by coyotes. Actually, that's kind of tempting right now...

What can I do, short of letting him out to have a heat stroke or be something's dinner, to calm him down????

EdlynsMom's Avatar EdlynsMom 03:26 AM 08-03-2006
Excercise. At 1 year old, hes an adolecent and has TONS of energy that will come out one way or another. Definatly go on walks with him when its a bit cooler in the day. You could also play energetic games inside, take him to a pet-friendly indoor place like a pet store and walk alot.
thekimballs's Avatar thekimballs 03:58 AM 08-03-2006
Poms aren't outdoor dogs anyway, and he SHOULD be inside most of the time. They are little tyrants, and if you give them free run outside they develop a lot of bad habits (or get killed). What you need to do is provide structured, hard play inside--WITH YOU--and long walks. And don't let him bark like that--that's dominant, impolite behavior and no other leader dog would tolerate it. He should cycle between his crate and exercise periods if he can't be calm in the house; his freedom should be a reward for being calm and quiet.

Adolescent dogs need at least an hour of exercise a day (3 20-minute periods are fine for him) regardless of breed. The more the better, really; remember that wolves are on the move 10 hours a day, and that's the heritage he's from.
2Sweeties1Angel's Avatar 2Sweeties1Angel 04:13 AM 08-03-2006
Quote:
Poms aren't outdoor dogs anyway, and he SHOULD be inside most of the time. They are little tyrants, and if you give them free run outside they develop a lot of bad habits (or get killed). What you need to do is provide structured, hard play inside--WITH YOU--and long walks. And don't let him bark like that--that's dominant, impolite behavior and no other leader dog would tolerate it. He should cycle between his crate and exercise periods if he can't be calm in the house; his freedom should be a reward for being calm and quiet.
Um, yeah. He's a dog and he'll go outside (weather permitting) if he wants to. It's cruel to keep a dog locked indoors just because some think that's the way it should be.
thekimballs's Avatar thekimballs 04:18 AM 08-03-2006
Now see, you say he's a dog, but you're resenting the fact that he's acting like one--barking dominantly, needing lots and lots and lots of exercise, and taking over the house if you don't keep him under control. The answer for a dog who needs exercise is NOT to just let him out the back door! Dogs need structured, intentional exercise if you want them to be good members of the family.

From the American Pomeranian Club (so not just "someone," but the body of the most educated Pom experts in the country):

Pomeranians are not outdoor dogs and cannot tolerate extreme temperatures, especially heat. They cannot tolerate hot summer days in the sun and must be kept indoors. Also, they are a family dog and feel abandoned if left alone in a yard. This can lead to nuisance barking. You will need to watch out for larger dogs, coyotes and flying predators like hawks, eagles, and owls who are looking for a meal. Also, there is a high demand for them, and they might be stolen so it is best to never leave them unattended outdoors.
2Sweeties1Angel's Avatar 2Sweeties1Angel 04:26 AM 08-03-2006
Heaven forbid someone vent about their dog barking at midnight or they're accused of being a bad dog parent@@ He doesn't normally bark a lot and it was getting on my nerves, ok? Sheesh.

He does not feel abandoned out in the yard. If he did, he wouldn't enjoy playing out there so much. I'm not worried about him being stolen because we live out in the middle of nowhere and we live pretty far back from the road. If something eats him during the day (unlikely since any predator would go after my chickens first), well, that's life. At least he got to enjoy it.

I'm sorry I ever came here.
thekimballs's Avatar thekimballs 04:29 AM 08-03-2006
I'm sorry you feel that way, but seriously, on this board you're posting the equivalent of "so my baby is screaming all night and I don't want to nurse her; what do I do?" We honestly could have been a lot more shocked/critical.

You asked what you could do to stop his behavior, and we told you. On this board we value both owners and pets; the quality of a pet's life is directly dependent on his owner's commitment to be not just an adequate home but a great one.
2Sweeties1Angel's Avatar 2Sweeties1Angel 04:34 AM 08-03-2006
For God's sake, I'm not ignoring my dog. Get over yourself. He's sitting here next to me and has finally managed to bark himself to sleep (oh no, puppy CIO, I guess). He's not a child, either, he's a DOG. I asked how to get him to stop barking right now because this is the only time he's done this since he first came to live with me.

What a waste of time.
EdlynsMom's Avatar EdlynsMom 02:02 PM 08-03-2006
To stop nuisance barking on a small dog like yours, you can try making a sharp loud noise of your own, to get him out of that mindset and then redirect; if it doesnt work, you can make a "mouth" out of your hand (fingers as teeth) and gently but firmly "bite" his neck/chest area like a mama dog would, hold him until he calms.
The very best thing that would help your dog is structured excercise (not running loose outside or at the end of a 20 foot extendable leash on a "walk"). Dogs are pack animals and need to feel connected which they do via walking. Because of the pack mentality, dogs also will take the dominant role if it isnt already taken by you, which is a recipe for disaster.
Youve been given some good advice, and I hope you take some of it, at least before "somethimg eats him during the day" : . Im sorry you felt attacked, but people on this forum feel strongly about the well being of pets and their families. Oh. and if anyone was goimg to attack you on this issue with nothing to back it up, it WOULDNT be Joanna, she really knows her stuff. Good luck to you.
thekimballs's Avatar thekimballs 02:38 PM 08-03-2006
(Not to 2sweeties anymore specifically; just general info for people reading this thread)

There is no behavior that I take more seriously than an adolescent male's. Puppies are very easily influenced, but when males hit about age 1 they begin to determine their place and their role within the pack structure. They seek out (and will make up for themselves if you don't provide them with one) a 9-5 job, basically. They need to be very firmly led to whatever it is that you determine is going to be their job, or they will do it on their own. Even submissive dogs will do it; their job may not be pack leader, but it could be "protect everyone from bad strangers" (who could be the kids next door) or "dismantle furniture at night." If you have other dogs, the issues become even more complex because of the dog-to-dog chemistry.

Once a dog hits about two or two and a half, he "knows" his job, and getting him out of that mindset is extremely difficult.

Tiny dogs are often given enormous leeway to be nasty, dominant little sods because the behaviors are on a small scale. They exhibit behaviors that are completely unacceptable, and as a result they become poor family members and will be targets for other dogs (because other dogs don't care that they're only 5 lb; if they see a rude dog, they'll either block or kill it). Don't ever forget that toy dogs are DOGS first--you need to shut down bad behavior and specify other behaviors wisely and proactively.

Poms are very, very common because they're so dang cute. But they are literally arctic (husky) type dogs on a very small scale--and the same cautions apply. I have to say that the Poms I know are some of the most naturally dominant and inconsiderate of leadership dogs that exist--that constant high-pitched barking and complete inability to settle down calmly when people are around are not just value-neutral breed characteristics; they're trying to force you to do stuff when you don't please them. And they don't like it when you're refusing to interact with them, which is why the pacing and panting. Poms need lots of exercise, they need calm, consistent leadership, they need panting, barking, and pacing SHUT DOWN immediately. They have the same ability any dog has to be wonderful, rewarding family companions, but it's a lot of work.
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