Rather urgent advice needed re: sores on my dog's neck - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 14 Old 04-19-2007, 12:24 AM - Thread Starter
 
KimProbable's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Posts: 1,524
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've got a little Jack Russell who's been scratching at his neck a lot lately. Last week I noticed it looked odd and upon closer inspection saw that there was an open sore. It was pretty small so I didn't worry too much about it and I put some bruise and wound gel on it (comfrey gel with some EOs).

Well, tonight I looked and it's all raw. There's an area about five or six inches long where he's got it all scratched up and it's bleeding and raw in a few spots. One part is scabbed over.

I'm wondering what to do for it tonight. I was thinking of washing it with some chamomile tea and maybe putting some lavender oil on it. Would tea tree sting on an open sore like that? I don't think I can do anything to cover it because he's not the type of dog to leave something alone like that.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated. I will look at taking him in to the vet if it doesn't get any better, but I'd like to see what I can do at home first.

Also, I'm trying to figure out what has caused this. My Mom suggested perhaps it was a food allergy (her dog went through this a few years ago) but we haven't changed the type of food he's been eating. We've owned him for 2 1/2 years and he's been on this one the whole time. He only very occasionally has any treats so I don't think it's a reaction to anything like that.

Thanks!

Kim - Wife to Liam , Unschooly mama to Nick (10/00) Lily (09/05) and Olivia (07/09)
KimProbable is offline  
#2 of 14 Old 04-19-2007, 12:40 AM
 
christyb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 201
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
What to do at home depends on what route you are going to take - allopathic or homeopathic or ...?

If it were me I would put him in the bath and turn the shower on very low and just warm (assuming you have a shower head with a hose) and hold the shower head directly on the wounded area (changing the shower head to least pressure setting). If you don't have that get a cup and keep dumping water on the wounded area. Don't use any soap or anything one it. After the area has been soaked and then soaked some more see if you can apply pressure to expel any puss, etc...

Don't put tea tree on it - from a homeopathic standpoint this weakens the vital force and pushes dis-ease further into the body. I would not put anything on it.

How would an elizabethan collar work on him with the would - would it keep him from scratching it?

What is he eating?
How much?
Treats?
Supplements?
Bedding - new bedding, new detergent?
When was he last vaccinated? What for?
When was the last time you used "preventatives" on him? What were they? Where were they applied?
New collar?
Bandana?
New leash?
New bowls?
New walking path?

**New could mean different, different formula, improved formula, etc...
christyb is offline  
#3 of 14 Old 04-19-2007, 01:03 AM - Thread Starter
 
KimProbable's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Posts: 1,524
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thank you for the quick response!

I'd rather go about things from a homeopathic route. We've just been through an eczema battle with DD and it turned out to be food sensitivities. I'm glad to have gone through the work of figuring it out an not going the route of cortisone cream. I'm much more interested in finding out the cause with Jack as well rather than repressing symptoms. I've got a few homeopathic remedies in the medicine cabinet. I could dig through them to find out exactly what's there and if they'd be useful.

I took him in the bath and ran warm water over the area for a while. There wasn't any puss or anything (thankfully) and the sore areas seem to be quite superficial. The scabbed area is mostly dried up and coming off already.

Looking at your list:

What is he eating? Nutro Natural Choice (from what I've just read their dry food isn't being recalled)
How much? About 1 1/2 to 2 cups per day (two meals each day)
Treats? He's recently had a few (about 6) milk bones I purchased in bulk at the grocery store.
Supplements? None
Bedding - new bedding, new detergent? New blanket, but it's more recent that the sores
When was he last vaccinated? What for? I haven't had him vaccinated since we adopted him 2 1/2 years ago. : They did all his basic shots, though I'm not sure off hand what they were. He was a stray and they vaxed assuming he'd never had any shots before.
When was the last time you used "preventatives" on him? What were they? Where were they applied? Just the bruise and wound gel last week.
New collar? Nope. He actually only wears his collar when he's off the property.
Bandana? No
New leash? No
New bowls? No
New walking path? No, but we do take him out to my parents' acreage frequently. He was there last on Easter. He runs around on the property and was around 4 other dogs that day.

Thanks again for helping me out!

Kim - Wife to Liam , Unschooly mama to Nick (10/00) Lily (09/05) and Olivia (07/09)
KimProbable is offline  
#4 of 14 Old 04-19-2007, 01:19 AM
 
christyb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 201
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Here's a great Yahoo group to join if you are interested in utilizing homeopathy for your little guy:

http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group...omeopathyPets/

Yeah - no more vaccines!!

Just want to make sure - no flea/tick/heartworm preventatives?

I forgot: new detergent, new dryer sheets, new bleach, new softener, new shampoo for him, new groomer, same groomer different products, etc...

Sounds like maybe he was injured on Easter.

I would seriously consider switching his diet to a raw diet.

Glad to hear he's doing well!
christyb is offline  
#5 of 14 Old 04-19-2007, 01:25 AM
 
Danemom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 334
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Running the water on him is called hydrotherapy and I was going to suggest that as well. It stimulates tissue growth on open wounds and helps them to heal much more quickly. Could he have a flea allergy and maybe got one or two on him at some point? My rottie (RIP) had a severe flea allergy and would get nasty, cheesy sores if she came into contact with any fleas at all! I was also going to ask about flea preventatives. Am right on cue with Christyb because I also suggest a raw diet.

And don't : for not vaccinating! There are a lot of members here who don't vaccinate!

Good luck with your baby!
Danemom is offline  
#6 of 14 Old 04-19-2007, 01:55 AM - Thread Starter
 
KimProbable's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Posts: 1,524
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Ok, I signed up for the Yahoo group.

For the new things you've suggested, nothing has changed their either. Our poor Jack has a pretty boring life with no changes.

When I read the first post about hydrotherapy I wondered why I'd never thought of it. It was the first thing we'd do with horses with injuries, but somehow I never made the connection to do the same with my dog.

I'm off to bed for now, but I'll do some reading about raw diets. Do either of you have suggestions on where I should look, or should I just Google it and see where it leads me?

Thanks!

Kim - Wife to Liam , Unschooly mama to Nick (10/00) Lily (09/05) and Olivia (07/09)
KimProbable is offline  
#7 of 14 Old 04-19-2007, 02:06 AM
 
christyb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 201
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Here's a Yahoo group of rawfeeders:

http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/rawfeeding/

It has more than 8,000 members, the archives are chock full of great info and the members are more than willing to help.

Some websites to check out:

http://www.drdomore.com/ (watch the video)
http://rawfed.com/
http://rawfeddogs.net/
http://rawlearning.com/

Here are the basics:

Raw meat, organs and bones only (80% meat/10% bones/10% organs - 5% liver and 5% all other organs). No veggies, fruits or grains. Feed 2%-5% of your dog's ideal weight. Feed 1x per day. Start with chicken (unenhanced) and when you have no digestive issues for 2 weeks then introduce another protein source, 2 weeks with no digestive issues then it's time to introduce another protein source and so on. Feed big - stay away from drumsticks and wings unless they are attached to the whole chicken! Stay away from ground pre-made raw - way too much bone and you miss out on the many wonderful benefits of feeding whole bone and it's really expensive! Do not feed beef bones or any recreation bones. The bone you feed should be edible bone.

Hope that helps!
christyb is offline  
#8 of 14 Old 04-19-2007, 01:41 PM
 
k9rider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Looking for a few good goats...
Posts: 1,687
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by christyb View Post
Here's a Yahoo group of rawfeeders:

http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/rawfeeding/

It has more than 8,000 members, the archives are chock full of great info and the members are more than willing to help.

Some websites to check out:

http://www.drdomore.com/ (watch the video)
http://rawfed.com/
http://rawfeddogs.net/
http://rawlearning.com/

Here are the basics:

Raw meat, organs and bones only (80% meat/10% bones/10% organs - 5% liver and 5% all other organs). No veggies, fruits or grains. Feed 2%-5% of your dog's ideal weight. Feed 1x per day. Start with chicken (unenhanced) and when you have no digestive issues for 2 weeks then introduce another protein source, 2 weeks with no digestive issues then it's time to introduce another protein source and so on. Feed big - stay away from drumsticks and wings unless they are attached to the whole chicken! Stay away from ground pre-made raw - way too much bone and you miss out on the many wonderful benefits of feeding whole bone and it's really expensive! Do not feed beef bones or any recreation bones. The bone you feed should be edible bone.

Hope that helps!

just curious...but what's wrong with giving a raw beef bone as a recreational bone if they are supervised and not hard chewers? i know their is a risk of a tooth fracture, but otherwise i'm at a loss as to why this is a "never".
k9rider is offline  
#9 of 14 Old 04-19-2007, 02:41 PM - Thread Starter
 
KimProbable's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Posts: 1,524
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Another thing I forgot to answer was about fleas. I'm not worried that it's a problem related to fleas since I've been told we don't have them in our area (too cold/dry or something).

Thank you for the links on raw food. I'll take a look at them.

I'm always amazed at the wealth of info from MDC members, and how I'm constantly challenged to look at things in a new way. The idea of a raw food diet had never even occurred to me. Just when I think I'm not mainstream because of my parenting choices someone shows me something new!

Kim - Wife to Liam , Unschooly mama to Nick (10/00) Lily (09/05) and Olivia (07/09)
KimProbable is offline  
#10 of 14 Old 04-19-2007, 05:12 PM
 
christyb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 201
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by k9rider View Post
just curious...but what's wrong with giving a raw beef bone as a recreational bone if they are supervised and not hard chewers? i know their is a risk of a tooth fracture, but otherwise i'm at a loss as to why this is a "never".
Kristin,

Tooth fracture is the reason! The problem is that a tooth fracture most likely will go unnoticed and repeated inury eventually will cause a break in the tooth. It's cumlative damage. Very painful for the dog, very expensive for the caregiver and a entry point for disease. If there is enough cumulative damage, meaning lots of missing teeth, the natural diet will suffer as they will probably only be able to eat chicken without interference or ground which has a way too high bone content and useless for prevention.

Wolves would not normally hunt a cow due so they aren't designed to be able to get through those massive bones that are required to carry around 3,000+lbs of body weight.

It's easier to just stay away from the "wreck" bones and let your dog get their bone chewing from edible bone (pork, lamb, goat, rabbit, etc...).
christyb is offline  
#11 of 14 Old 04-19-2007, 05:22 PM
 
Rico'sAlice's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Southern Berkshire County, MA
Posts: 3,167
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I dunno. I think it depends on the size of the dog, jaw strength, which bone you are talking about.
For my dogs most beef bones *are* edible bones. The difference is just in how long it takes them to finish them. And my dogs DO chew. They aren't just gulping eveything whole.
For example a chicken back takes around one minute. Same thing with a whole small bird, like quail. Whole cornish hens are about 2-3 minutes.
Pork neck bones take about 2-3 minutes.
Beef neck bones take 5-8 minutes.
And beef knuckle bones take 3-4 hours, but do get eaten completely.
A whole oxtail (not the little cut up things) would also take a few hours, but eventually be all gone.
So where do you draw the line?
(I don't feed marrow bones b/c of the tooth thing. and also b/c they are boring.)
Rico'sAlice is offline  
#12 of 14 Old 04-19-2007, 05:33 PM
 
mtn.mama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Off the grid, AK
Posts: 3,222
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm glad to hear that your doggy is healing up Another method that I have had good success with is using wormwood poultices several times a day.

I'd like to chime in on the topic of bones... wolves kill moose up here all the time and are conditioned to be able to break down large bones. Granted, a Jack Russell isn't a wolf...

I feed raw when I have it available and dry-soaked the rest of the time. The only time I spot digestive problems is when there's too much fat in the diet.

There are no bones off limits at my house. Sometimes large quantities of big bones are available to my dogs, as we run a big-game hunting outfit for our livelihood.

We've had no tooth problems after 20 years of raising dozens and dozens of sleddogs from 'cradle to grave'.

Lisa

chicken3.gif   We're remote ECing, unschooling, free ranging goat dairy farmers.  

mtn.mama is offline  
#13 of 14 Old 04-19-2007, 05:34 PM
 
k9rider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Looking for a few good goats...
Posts: 1,687
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
ok thanks christy!
k9rider is offline  
#14 of 14 Old 04-19-2007, 06:09 PM
 
christyb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 201
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Big bones are not bad if they are appropriate. Moose is natural prey for a wolf/dog and at less than 1/2 of a cow's weight those bones are totally fine. I wish I had access to moose - lucky you!!

The way to help your dog get maximum benefit and chewing pleasure is to feed BIG. For example, feed chicken backs if they are buried under skin, meat and there are wings and legs attached - in other words, whole chicken. My dog will chew a cheerio so she is a good chewer too and like your dog can get through small offerings rather quickly. She cannot however, get through a 15 pound pork shoulder roast in a minute or even 30 minutes. She doesn't eat the whole thing in one sitting (she's 60 pounds) but it takes her a nice long time to rip, pull, grip, grind, chew, chomp, etc... and she gets her chewing needs/pleasure from that.

Most of my fosters are puppies and they are all fed exclusively raw. I offer chew toys (kongs) but they aren't interested in them except in using them for a game of keep away. They don't chew on furniture, flooring, doors, crud found on the ground, stuft animals, etc.... They get their chewing needs met at meal time(s).
christyb is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off