What small-medium sized dogs are generally good with young kids? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 91 Old 07-02-2007, 12:36 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Hi Mamas,
I've been absent from MDC for quite some time and I'm happy to be back. I know there are many dog experts here and I thought I'd throw this out there: Are there any small-medium sized dogs that have a good rep with young kids?

We know a dog is in our future, but our kids are young (5 & almost 3). We know we want to wait a while (probably another year or more), but I've been researching breeds for some time. We will definitely adopt/rescue whatever pet comes into our lives. I've heard such good things about labs, and although I love them and know that the bigger dogs *tend* to be less nippy and will give young kids a little more "room" to climb, hug, etc., I can't help but keep thinking about their size. How will it fit in the car? How can we take it on vacation? Clearly any pet requires alterations to one's lifestyle, but perhaps a medium-sized dog would be better for us.

Any suggestions? TIA
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#2 of 91 Old 07-02-2007, 01:19 PM
 
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From my experience, most breeds or mixes with some hound or larger spaniel are typically pretty young child friendly. Avoid American cockers since they aren't what they used to be YEARS ago. English cockers are pretty good though. Almost every puppy will be 'rough' with kids since they all use their mouths and jump a lot. Those behaviors can be redirected with patience, treats and appropriate outlets like good bones and exercise. I would avoid a herding type unless you are into barking or can give the dog a job. Labs are pretty well know family dogs but take at least 3 years to mature past the puppy stage and need a lot of exercise plus they can overwhelm young kids since they normally are pretty boisterous. If you utilize a rescue group, they will be very happy to match your family's needs with an appropriate dog

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#3 of 91 Old 07-02-2007, 01:46 PM
 
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I second looking into rescue, probably for and adult dog. Look for a rescue that fosters their dogs and they should be able to match you with a small/medium dog that does well with kids.

Breed wise, I know that Cavalier King Charles Spaniels are supposed to be great family dogs. The problem lies in finding a good breeder, then the cost of the pup (1-2k) or having to wait A LONG time to find one through rescue.

~Julia
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#4 of 91 Old 07-02-2007, 01:49 PM
 
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I am starting to really like beagles and beagle mixes small-mid short-haired kid dogs. Barking can be an issue, though, so it depends how you feel about that. And I second the recommendation to adopt a young adult dog, rather than a puppy.
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#5 of 91 Old 07-02-2007, 01:59 PM
 
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Originally Posted by jlutgendorf View Post

Breed wise, I know that Cavalier King Charles Spaniels are supposed to be great family dogs. The problem lies in finding a good breeder, then the cost of the pup (1-2k) or having to wait A LONG time to find one through rescue.

~Julia
I was going to recommend the same breed! I had no idea they were so expensive, though. They seem to be getting more common, though, so maybe the price will come down (hopefully without lowering the quality of breeding!) There are a few Cavalier King Charles Spaniels in our town, and they always look so happy to see kids. Very gentle and sweet. And cute as heck.

The only problem with planning to get a rescue dog or a dog from a shelter (and I think rescuing an adult dog is a great idea!), is that you might be tempted to take the first dog or puppy you see. This is my problem, anyway. It's hard to look at those sweet faces and say, "No, I don't think he's the right one for us." If you end up with the wrong dog, it can be a nightmare for all involved. (Speaking from experience as someone who thought it was a great idea to adopt an elderly miniature schnauzer. : )
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#6 of 91 Old 07-02-2007, 02:05 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Hi Mamas,
Thank you all for the suggestions. I've also heard great things about Cavaliers. However, I think they are rarely up at rescues and we do not want to pay for a dog. Although I *think* I found a rescue that focused on them a while back doing a search and now I can't find it. If I come across it again, I'll post.

I've also heard that Beagles can be great dogs. Hound mixes (we are all for mutts!) might be a good mix, too.

We are very open to adult/young adult dogs. In fact, although puppies are awfully cute, they are a lot of work and we'll have to be extra prepared for a pup.

I'm sure there are great dogs for kids in any breed, but having your suggestions is helpful and will widen our search.
Thank you and keep 'em coming!
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#7 of 91 Old 07-02-2007, 02:44 PM
 
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I'm always a fan of mutts. I can't wait to pick out our drooly old mutt hound next year! I would say to start visiting the SPCA or local rescue in your area as soon as you're ready. When you see the right dog, meet him/her, go for walks, introduce the kids, you'll know who belongs to you! I wouldn't think about getting stuck in a breed. Just look for a nice dog with kind eyes, and spend some time with it before making a choice. MOst rescues/spca's will let you spend time walking or even fostering a dog before you make a full on adoption. for something extra special, maybe look into saving a gulf coast doggie. They're still out there and sstill need homes.

Good luck!
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#8 of 91 Old 07-02-2007, 07:52 PM
 
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I have a besenji mix (who I thought for a long time was a bealge! ) and he is TERRIFIC with the kids! He's very gentle and "cat-like." Oh, and NEVER barks!

~Marie : Mom to DS(11), DS(10), DD(8), DD(4), DD(2), & Happily Married to DH 12 yrs.!
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#9 of 91 Old 07-02-2007, 11:38 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Hi Marie & Hkline-Thanks for your replies.
I am a big fan of the mutt. Big fan. I know that I can/will fall in love with a dog when I meet the right one. But I also want to be prepared with some breeds in mind so I can start looking at specific rescues.
I grew up with a small dog (a cockapoo-type) and he was the love of my life. My DH, however, seems to think that labs and the bigger dogs are a better choice. I'm thinking somewhere in the middle. My oldest has said many times, "Mommy, I want a dog who will be my best friend".
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#10 of 91 Old 07-03-2007, 12:46 AM
 
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Hi Mamas,
Thank you all for the suggestions. I've also heard great things about Cavaliers. However, I think they are rarely up at rescues and we do not want to pay for a dog.
If you do not want to pay for a dog, don't get a dog. Rescues have a lower adoption price versus purchase price, but that is IT. You should be prepared to more than make up for that in vet bills, training costs, etc. I'm not discouraging anyone from rescue, but I do think that expecting a rescue dog to be a cheap dog is really incorrect.

The small/medium breeds I recommend for young children are unlikely to be found in local rescue. That's because 1) these breeds are relatively rare--which is a good thing, because that way the backyard breeders and puppy mills are not interested in breeding the goodness and health out of them, and 2) the breed organizations are in really good shape, and breeders/breed-specific rescue are nabbing most of the purebreds that come into shelters before there is any danger of the dogs being euthanized. So if you want to go through rescue, you'll need to contact the local or national breed rescue organizations, and quite possibly wait a while.

One that I do recommend is the Cavalier. However, you have to be aware that the Cav is absolutely riddled with health problems. Unfortunately, the genetic bottlenecking of the breed turned out to concentrate some really bad genes, and heart problems and brain problems are two of the biggest issues. Good breeders do not breed any affected dogs, but the dogs coming into rescue are not from good breeders. So you should anticipate at least the expense of a major health screening and quite possibly lifetime medication and/or careful management.

The others, in no particular order, are Cardigan Welsh Corgi (virtually never in rescue, except some elderlies, but an absolutely fantastic breed), the Schipperke, the Clumber and Sussex Spaniels, the French Bulldog, the English Cocker Spaniel, the Shetland Sheepdog, the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever, and the Basset Hound (though, to be honest, I would not recommend rescuing a Basset from anything but an extremely experienced/selective rescue, because so many poorly bred ones have temperament issues).

If you click on either link in my signature, then on "articles," you'll find a long article on how to choose the correct breed for your family. Here's a hint: I do NOT recommend the large sporting dogs or large hounds for most families, even though they're so incredibly popular. Most of those dogs are living lives of quiet desperation in homes totally unsuited to them. Don't get a large hunting dog or large hound unless you intend to give him or her the tremendous amount of exercise, training, and stimulation that they so terribly need.
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#11 of 91 Old 07-03-2007, 11:18 AM
 
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If you do not want to pay for a dog, don't get a dog. Rescues have a lower adoption price versus purchase price, but that is IT. You should be prepared to more than make up for that in vet bills, training costs, etc. I'm not discouraging anyone from rescue, but I do think that expecting a rescue dog to be a cheap dog is really incorrect.
VERY CORRECT. Rescue dogs are not free ~ and for good reason. As rescuers we have to pay vetting bills and if we gave away our fosters ~ we couldn't afford to rescue more than just a couple until we were too far in the red! Besides that ~ do not get a dog if you do not have the money to commit to that dog. As thekimballs mentioned there are so many costs involved with having a dog...and if you do not have the money to cover the basic costs then you could start resenting the dog and not getting appropriate care. Not saying that you would but expecting a dog for free is not a good thing.

That being said ~ there are plenty of great rescue dogs and reputable rescuers who can assist in finding the right rescue for you! If you do desire a more rare dog in rescue (I have a friend who does Schipperke Rescue) you can apply and then get on their waiting list. The other idea is to find a rescue that does all breed but does inhome fostering and knows their fosters and works hard at appropriate placement.

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#12 of 91 Old 07-03-2007, 11:21 AM
 
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Just want to reiterate what thekimballs said about finding small/med dogs in rescue. We searched rescues literally for a year to find a small to medium dog who had a proven background with children. We combed every local/regional rescue web site daily and visited local shelters darned near every weekend. All our local small-dog breed specific rescues have restrictions against adopting their dogs out to families with small children for understandable reasons. I simply wasn't willing to bring a dog into our home who didn't have experience with children.

We ended up getting a puppy from a reputable breeder and she is simply wonderful! Initially I was dead set against a puppy but in the end, it was what was right for us at this time.
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#13 of 91 Old 07-03-2007, 11:43 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Hi Mamas,
I have a quick minute to check in and saw some new posts. Thank you all for the information.

Joanna & mamas--I don't think I was clear about what I meant about NOT paying for a dog. I mean--not "purchasing" a dog through a store, breeder, etc. We are fully aware of the price of vet care and are even thoroughly considering the extra cost to our grocery/food bill for dog food, accesories, you name it. I should have said, "We do not want to PURCHASE a dog". Meaning we want to do rescue/adoption for any pet that comes into our lives. We also have seen the adoption fees for local rescues and they are typically about $200 for a dog. That usually includes initial vet care, etc., not to mention the time, effort, etc., of the volunteers and foster families trying to live with and take care of these pets in order for them to find the right match with their forever home.

More later...
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#14 of 91 Old 07-03-2007, 11:46 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Joanna-I just had another minute to read your post in its entirety. What great information and written like a true animal lover. I can tell. Thank you again. More soon.
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#15 of 91 Old 07-03-2007, 12:04 PM
 
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I'm really confused at the sentiment here that it's really hard to find a good dog in rescue. Yes, you have to be cautious and realize what you are getting into with a rescue dog, sure, but it's not like most dogs in rescue are horrible untrainable beasts or anything. I'd trust the majority of my foster dogs to be great pets in many situations (there are definitely exceptions that needed to be in certain types of homes, but that's what I am for as a rescuer--to help match the dog and the family). Yes, there is going to be adjustment, and the new people have to commit to working with the dog, but that's true with breeder dogs too.

Anyway, I think the attitude that it's hard or unlikely to find a good dog in rescue is ridiculous, and I don't see where it's coming from.
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#16 of 91 Old 07-03-2007, 01:47 PM
 
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I think it's ideal to adopt a young adult dog living in a foster home! They are usually already housetrained and often have some basic training. With a good rescue, you know what you're getting behavior-wise. It might be hard to find small or toy breeds that are good with kids in rescues, but that's more likely due to the temperament of the smaller breeds. Plus, lots of people want small dogs, so they get adopted quickly. There are plenty of medium-sized dogs to choose from in rescues!

I have a medium sized black lab mix (50 pounds) and she is the most wonderful dog. So tolerant and she loves kids. We're considering a beagle or beagle mix for a second dog. So here's another vote for beagles and beagle mixes. What about a pug or pug mix?

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#17 of 91 Old 07-03-2007, 02:07 PM
 
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I'm really confused at the sentiment here that it's really hard to find a good dog in rescue. Yes, you have to be cautious and realize what you are getting into with a rescue dog, sure, but it's not like most dogs in rescue are horrible untrainable beasts or anything. I'd trust the majority of my foster dogs to be great pets in many situations (there are definitely exceptions that needed to be in certain types of homes, but that's what I am for as a rescuer--to help match the dog and the family). Yes, there is going to be adjustment, and the new people have to commit to working with the dog, but that's true with breeder dogs too.

Anyway, I think the attitude that it's hard or unlikely to find a good dog in rescue is ridiculous, and I don't see where it's coming from.
It's not necessarily hard to find "a good dog" in rescue, but it can be close to impossible to find a particular breed or type of dog that's ideal for an individual family in LOCAL rescue. In my area (Massachusetts/New Hampshire), the local shelters just simply do not have small dogs unless they are very elderly and infirm. This is not just me talking; I've had many conversations with the local dog professionals and kennel clubs about it. It's a very, very good thing--not only do we have fewer dogs being turned in, thanks to nearly universal spay/neuter, but the local purebred clubs and rescues are extremely vigilant and will remove dogs from shelters before they hit the general population. If you go to my local shelter, there will be pits and pit mixes (probably 80%) and a few lab mixes. The fact is, I DO NOT recommend pits or mixes for the average family, and lab mixes are quite often too big and powerful to be a good match. So those families that want a small dog and are committed to rescue must go through the breed-specific rescues, often the national rescues, and wait for a dog from Ohio or similar.

I just heard the rescue report from "my" club, the Yankee Cardigan Welsh Corgi Club. It covers all the New England states. Despite combing the shelters and a national grapevine the likes of which I have never seen (for example, a year ago somebody heard about a Cardigan in a shelter in SC and there were offers from as far away as PA to drive down IMMEDIATELY and get the dog out) have rescue placements that I can count on one hand over a period of something like two years, and all of them have been placed privately by individual breeders. So yeah, if you want to rescue a Cardigan, a breed I wholeheartedly DO recommend to families, you're going to be waiting for years. Ditto for the Sussex Spaniel, a fabulous breed.

I do, and have always, supported rescue. It would be irresponsible of me not to. But I don't think that you should get a dog that is wrong for you or for your family simply because it's a rescue. The wrong dog is just going to end up frustrated and ignored/misunderstood, no better off than it was in the shelter. A solitary yard is as much a prison as a tiny kennel run is. The right match for a lifelong functioning and ideal relationship is the number one concern.
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#18 of 91 Old 07-03-2007, 02:14 PM
 
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Hrm. Things must just be better where you are, because there are a LOT of dogs in rescue here that aren't pit or lab mixes. For example, I work with a hound rescue, and we are constantly turning away beagles, even young and healthy ones, because there are just too many of them.

Which isn't to say that some breeds aren't hard or impossible to find in rescue--they certainly are. But it's not like it's "all small dogs," at least not here. It's just dogs of certain breeds. And I do think that is in part due to the excellent work done by the breed clubs for those breeds. Wish it were like that for all of them.
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#19 of 91 Old 07-03-2007, 02:17 PM
 
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PUGS!!!

Yeah, yeah, I know that now they are considered designer, popular dogs but I had one before they were the "in" thing in dogs.

They are just lovable cuddly and wonderful dogs. They are gentle, hardly bark and to be honest, just to darn lazy and stupid to bother biting someone!! hehehe.

I would get another one in a heartbeat.

On the flip side...I have a miniature pinscher now and she is wonderful but honestly, with kids, I would stay away from the Min Pin if I were to do it again.

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#20 of 91 Old 07-03-2007, 02:22 PM
 
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I have a medium sized black lab mix (50 pounds) and she is the most wonderful dog. So tolerant and she loves kids. We're considering a beagle or beagle mix for a second dog. So here's another vote for beagles and beagle mixes. What about a pug or pug mix?
How happy you're going to be with a beagle depends on whether you can meet its needs and not be driven crazy by the normal breed characteristics. Beagles are LOUD--often hysterically loud--they dig a ton, they can never be trusted off-leash, and if they ever get loose they're GONE. They tend to be friendly, charming dogs, but they are rabbit hunters. They've been bred for centuries to go all day after rabbits, and they've got just as much hunting drive as their large hound cousins. So they need a lot of exercise and stimulation (I would say a minimum of an hour a day of running would be appropriate), and the ideal beagle home would be one that would at least investigate getting involved in field trials where the genius of their dog can shine through. Beagles are smart dogs, but they're stubborn and they housebreak slowly. MANY of the poorly bred ones are neurotic and shy, which is totally unlike the way the beagle temperament should be, so screening them carefully for suitability to kids is absolutely vital.

A good pug is a GREAT dog. However, finding a good pug can be difficult. The breed has tons and TONS of health problems, so those coming into rescue will need a complete workup for palate, spine, hip, eye, and other problems. Pugs have unique physical requirements--they have to be kept cool/warm, they cannot ever be left outside unsupervised for fear of heat stroke or hypothermia. They are notoriously difficult to housebreak. Most of the mixes available in rescue right now are puggles, which have a temperament that (personally) drives me NUTS. All the in-your-face ditzy adoration of the pug plus the drive and stubbornness of the beagle. The puggles we have in training class are, to a dog, too active for their owners, tend to be dominant, and have the attention span of a gnat. Puggle puppies are absolutely adorable, which is why they're such an incredibly popular cross, but the ever-increasing numbers showing up in rescue (most of them taken in by the purebred pug groups, with great longsuffering) should let you know that the adult dog is often a far different proposition.
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#21 of 91 Old 07-03-2007, 02:25 PM
 
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How happy you're going to be with a beagle depends on whether you can meet its needs and not be driven crazy by the normal breed characteristics. Beagles are LOUD--often hysterically loud--they dig a ton, they can never be trusted off-leash, and if they ever get loose they're GONE. They tend to be friendly, charming dogs, but they are rabbit hunters. They've been bred for centuries to go all day after rabbits, and they've got just as much hunting drive as their large hound cousins. So they need a lot of exercise and stimulation (I would say a minimum of an hour a day of running would be appropriate), and the ideal beagle home would be one that would at least investigate getting involved in field trials where the genius of their dog can shine through. Beagles are smart dogs, but they're stubborn and they housebreak slowly. MANY of the poorly bred ones are neurotic and shy, which is totally unlike the way the beagle temperament should be, so screening them carefully for suitability to kids is absolutely vital.
I rescue beagles. This is, IMO, an overstatement.
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#22 of 91 Old 07-03-2007, 02:51 PM
 
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We got an American Staffordshire Terrier through a local rescue and she is the best dog we have ever had. She is highly trainable, very eager to please, great with the kids and almost never barks. We got her at 15 months old and she already knew her basic commands. We had her walking on a leash perfectly in no time at all. She's a medium sized dog. I think most staffies are around 50 pounds. Ours is a mutant at 70lbs She doesn't seem that big because she is mostly muscle. Another thing I like about this breed is they have short smooth hair which makes for easy grooming.

There are a lot of great dogs in foster homes. Petco often has adoption days where people will bring their rescues in for people to meet. That is how we found our dog.

Good luck! I hope you find the perfect dog for your family
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#23 of 91 Old 07-03-2007, 02:53 PM
 
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I rescue beagles. This is, IMO, an overstatement.
http://www.beaglerescuevic.org/about-beagle-breed.htm

scroll down to "Why a beagle isn't for everyone."

Besides knowing a bunch of beagles, I always check my facts with rescue groups before I post anything. Are there perfect, wonderful, quiet beagles? Of course. Should you get a beagle, *expecting* a quiet, nondestructive, easy to train dog? No.
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#24 of 91 Old 07-03-2007, 03:00 PM
 
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I didn't accuse you of not checking your facts, and I think a lot of what you say is correct, I just (like I said) think it's overstated. For example, yes, beagles bark. But if they are properly exercised and taken care of, I don't think they bark hysterically, at least not generally. Same with digging.
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#25 of 91 Old 07-03-2007, 03:02 PM
 
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We got an American Staffordshire Terrier through a local rescue and she is the best dog we have ever had. She is highly trainable, very eager to please, great with the kids and almost never barks.
Am Staffs are not necessarily the same thing as pit bulls, but most "Am Staffs" coming into rescue should be considered to be the exact same thing.

Am Staffs/pit bulls are, usually, great with families and kids. However, they have two distinctives that any prospective owner should know about. 1) They have been bred for--well, ever--to fight other dogs. If you cannot look at your dog and say "This dog is custom-designed to kill other dogs" and make the appropriate changes to your life and habits to protect all other dogs, you should not own an Am Staff. 2) They have a higher-than-normal incidence of what's called "predatory drift." A dog has three types of bites--the play bite, the punishment bite, and the predatory bite. Dogs with predatory drift tend to switch from one of the other bites to the predatory/killing bite a little more easily and with less (or no) provocation. The "classic" pit bull story is a bully playing peacefully with another dog and then suddenly killing it. So for that reason I would never trust a pit, even one "known to" be good with dogs and other animals, to not predate on them eventually.

The other very important thing to keep in mind is that while the well-bred pit/Am Staff is extraordinarily safe with humans, the poorly bred ones have no such assurance. *Any* sign of aggression to humans and the dog should immediately be put down. It's a hard truth, but it's the truth.
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#26 of 91 Old 07-03-2007, 03:28 PM
 
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I agree with most of what you are saying about staffies/pit bulls. People who own them must train their dog well and go above and beyond what other dog owners must do as far as training. I personally love this breed and feel that it is well worth the effort.

I also firmly believe that any pit that bites should be euthanized immediatly.

Animal aggresion is part of the breed, but I have found it easy to keep a handle on. We almost have our dog to the point where she will not look at small animals including small dogs. We do let her play with friend's dogs, but we don't let it get past a certain level. We watch her closely and end it if any agressive cues appear. We will eventually have her trained to the point that she ignores all small animals and unfamiliar dogs.

Sorry for the novel! In essense, staffies/pits can be excellent family pets if you are willing to do a little research and ongoing training. Our family really enjoys the training aspect so they are a great fit for us.
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#27 of 91 Old 07-03-2007, 04:39 PM
 
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I think with regard to rescue ~ location is everything. I am involved in a national rescue organization for my breed ~ and our northern rescuers are almost begging for our breed to adopt out. I live in the south and I am always BEGGING for calls to stop from local shelters and families that want to surrender.

Southern states have always had a higher incidence of animals in shelters ~ likely for many reasons. I can imagine that in the north it is hard to find purebred animals in the shelters that need homes (and are not either infirmed or have severe behavior issues) ~ but that is not the case where I live.

I think on both fronts ~ rescue and breeders ~ the idea is to find reputable people who are honest and up front. There are so many things to 'research' like what kind of contracts they require and what their responsibility is to the animal once you have adopted it (ANY reputable rescuer and breeder will require you to return the animal to them ~ and only them ~ and require you to sign an agreement).

There is no denying that there are reputable breeders out there ~ but there are plenty of reputable rescues too. ANYONE can have a horrible experience buying from a breeder just as they can adopting for a disreputable rescuer. The idea is more that you research the rescue you choose to use and make sure you are finding a dog that matches what will fit in your family (and have good rescuers to assist you in doing so).

To the OP ~ I think it is great that you seem very flexible in the breed and seem most open to what dog will fit your home. I think that attitude works best in conjunction with reputable rescue organizations and I wish you luck in your search. BTW, what state do you live in? I can refer you to some reputable rescue organizations perhaps.

Wife to DH (06/09/01), Mother to DS coolshine.gif (04/10/06) saynovax.gif and rescuer of dachshunds ~ and joy.gifthat our rainbow1284.gif arrived (06/10/11) safe and sound. Love cd.gif our little one ~ and lactivist.gif

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#28 of 91 Old 07-04-2007, 01:10 PM
 
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The OP said she is a big fan of the mutt. That's great! There's a great book called Mutts: America's Dogs that describes how the different breeds in the mix affect behavior.

Book-lovin', relaxed homeschoolin', dog snugglin' mom of the best kid EVER!  AND...waiting for baby #2, due 5/9/14!  stork-boy.gif

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#29 of 91 Old 07-05-2007, 07:07 PM
 
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I have a Cardigan Welsh Corgi, and he is a wonderful dog! He is very tolerant of young children. But he is not a snuggly dog - he'll come over to get his ears scratched, then curl up on a blanket by himself. He is smart, adorable, and sheds like crazy. We had a huge Lab, and while we considered him to be the best dog in the whole world, he was also much too big - we had to get a van to be able to take him anywhere after we had kids. A Corgi is a small dog who thinks he's a big dog.

The breeder I bought him from sometimes has adult dogs available - dogs that either didn't perform as expected in the show ring (or one a while ago who simply didn't like to show), or are retired from showing or breeding. They are sold as pets (as was my pup - he has an overbite). They are raised as housedogs, with lots of socialization and love.

If the chips are down, the buffalo is empty.

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#30 of 91 Old 07-05-2007, 07:20 PM
 
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Joanna, how do you think a Cardigan would get along with a Gordon Setter? This wouldn't happen for quite some time, but we'd like a second dog at some point, and not necessarily another large sporting breed. We love the look of the Cardie!

Sorry for the hijack.

Heather, Mama to DS(10) DD(7.5),DD(6)
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