Would you adopt a pit bull from the shelter? - Page 3 - Mothering Forums

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#61 of 131 Old 03-02-2008, 03:17 AM
 
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I haven't read through the entire thread, but I did adopt my pit bull from a shelter and she's wonderful. She was here before the baby and we have had no issues at all.

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#62 of 131 Old 03-02-2008, 03:27 AM - Thread Starter
 
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No, I dont think you should turn it down because its a pit, for sure. As long as you know pitties are strong, very agile (mine could clear a 7 foot fence, no joke), have high exercise needs, are usually dog aggressive (which you might not see for a few weeks with a new dog on 'good' behaviour - that is what happened to me with mine), and that they have a hard time obeying in situations where they want to follow their urges... those are the drawbacks IMO but there are also many, many positives about the breed.

And getting a ferret probably cancels out getting a pit, and vice versa, because with few exceptions, IME pitties can't stop themselves from trying to eat cats, ferrets, etc. My little girl is fine with our cats but she is 11 years old and an extreme tempermental rarity in the pittie world.

Good luck with your decision mama!
Thanks so much for this! Yes, I want to look for a dog that would be ok with other pets. (<looks around sheepishly, whispers:>My mom calls me Elli May Clampett.) We are now stable, and I cannot go through life without my animals. It depresses me. So Yes, I know I will eventually have a dog plus some other animals, it's important to me. It's good to know which breeds may not be good with other animals.

And to the PP also, I worked with a veterinarian, and she said the same thing about little dogs. She said most of the big dogs (especially the more mature ones) were laid back, and the little dogs tended to be very nippy. For this and a few other reasons, I would prefer a larger dog. (Although I won't turn down a small one who has the traits I'm looking for, including non-nippiness..)
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#63 of 131 Old 03-02-2008, 03:34 AM
 
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Yeah, I mean never say never, you could find that wiggly submissive runty pit bull (like my current pittie!) who would do just fine with other animals. I had another very dominant pit bull for years and they did fine together, my housemate has a dog, and we have two cats who actually boss the dog and not the other way around. It's possible to come across a pit bull who is just fine with other animals. But, it is quite rare for this particular breed, with the fighting history, non-animal-aggression is not entirely natural for them and is something of an anomaly.

It is darn well too bad I say, because otherwise they are a perfect pet. The propensity for dog aggression (and other animal aggression) really, really does suck and is a PITA to accommodate IME.
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#64 of 131 Old 03-02-2008, 10:25 AM
 
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[QUOTE=Stinkerbell;10666545]YES! i know a lot about dogs. enough to know that breed, alone, is NOT a reason to choose or decline a pet
Stinkerbell, you are right on!

Thismama, you brought tears to my eyes when you mentioned the death of your pit.

Tigermama, IMO you were one of the first bring up valid reasons not to adopt a pit from a shelter.

And a general response after reading through the first few pages of replies... I am kind of shocked to find so much rampant breed-ism and close-mindedness on this board.

A good resource for info on pit bulls is www.badrap.org - I love their slogan of judge the deed not the breed!

Will reply again with our own experience when I finish the reading thread... just wanted to thank the moms above for their contributions before they got lost (will need to learn how to incorporate multiple quotes some day...)

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#65 of 131 Old 03-02-2008, 10:29 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Lula's Mom View Post
thismama, I agree with all of your posts in this thread. I can see you know and love the breed too.

There are definitely precautions to take and traits to be aware of. But gosh, there are a lot of myths out there... and as a Pit Bull owner for 16 years now, it never stops being disheartening for me. If a Pit Bull does not fit into (general) your life or your family, by all means get a different dog, but don't believe or spread all the untruths you've heard about Pits, either. Especially implying that they can seem sweet and wonderful on the surface, but suddenly turn into monsters that maul random people in the neighborhood. Geeze. I can guarantee you that any Pit Bull that attacks a human does not do so out of the blue, with no prior warning signs. The red flags of that dog's behavior were ignored, accepted, or even encouraged- probably for a long time- by the idiots who owned it.
Lula's Mom - just got to your posts love them too!

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#66 of 131 Old 03-02-2008, 10:37 AM
 
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Originally Posted by wedgered2 View Post
By taking on an APBT you are instantly taking on the predjudices that people have with the breed.
This is a good point, and something we embraced even though we didn't know we were getting into it. I feel that as a pit-mix family we have a responsibility to change these prejudices by providing folks we meet with a positive interaction.

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#67 of 131 Old 03-02-2008, 10:45 AM
 
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Originally Posted by thekimballs View Post
Pit breeds shouldn't be at the dog park, period. I don't care how experienced you are....
...But Pit-type dogs, no matter how well-behaved, should NOT go to dog parks. Pits are instinctively dog-aggressive, and while a truly savvy and experienced oskin).
Not ALL pits are dog on dog aggressive!! I agree that a dog on dog aggressive dog should NOT be at the dog park, I do not agree that breed is an absolute factor in determining that. BEHAVIOR is the key, not breed.

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#68 of 131 Old 03-02-2008, 10:55 AM
 
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Our pit never went after our cats, or other dogs for that matter. He loved other dogs, and liked to play. The cats have always ruled in our house. Well, until now...we have a shephard/greyhound cross that likes to put her mouth on the cat's head, lol
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#69 of 131 Old 03-02-2008, 11:06 AM
 
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Thanks for the clarification, gabysmom.

I read "dog/ferret" and "tomorrow" and jumped to the conclusion it was an impulsive decision.

Best of luck with your pet search!

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#70 of 131 Old 03-02-2008, 11:06 AM
 
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Our pit mix sleeps with out cat, and is the easiest, lowest maintenance dog I ever lived with. This is not necessarily because she is a pit. Its just who she is.

Adopting a dog is a big responsibility and it is hard to assess any dog, any breed in a short visit to a shelter or even at an off-site adoption day. If you can find a local rescue organization, some will allow you to foster overnight or for a few days to "try a dog out" for a few days. Fostering with a young family is not easy and requires extra vigilance. Plus foster dogs can be hard on your home but could pay off by ultimately helping you to find a better fit for your family. Plus you get to help some animals in the process.

Dog on dog aggression is more likely in a pit than in other breeds, but not in every pit. Dog on dog aggression really, really sucks in any dog and I think it would be really hard to manage with kids around and dangerous if the kids got in the way. My sister had a dog like this (not a pit), and it there was a Dr, Jeckel and Mr Hyde aspect to her behavior (the dogs, not my sisters!). She put the dog down before my first son was born after thousands of dollars and a lot of heartbreak.

Also, given all the breed-ism out there... most shelters are flooded with pits and pit mixes. You may find a greater range of temperments in the shelter at any given time within the breed. For example... shelter could have one golden retriever, who is there for an actual behavior reason, but 10 pits... 4 there for behavior reasons, and the other 6 just cause most folks don't want pits and there are many irresponsible pit owners who don't spay/ neuter. (I totally admint, all numbers pulled out my a**, just based on my experience walking dogs in Berkeley, CA shelter and fostering for the Milo Foundation).

One way the breed-ism has worked in our favor is that I feel safer, not because my dog is more protective, but because of how folks view my dog. I hike and jog alone with my kids and dog sometimes and have lived in many transitional neighborhoods (bars in window, known crime etc.), and feel safer as a woman home alone or walking alone because of how people react to the breed.

And finally Gabysmom... kudos to you for taking the time to look into this and approaching pet adoption thoughtfully. Best of luck in your decision.

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#71 of 131 Old 03-02-2008, 02:53 PM
 
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Not ALL pits are dog on dog aggressive!! I agree that a dog on dog aggressive dog should NOT be at the dog park, I do not agree that breed is an absolute factor in determining that. BEHAVIOR is the key, not breed.
The likelihood of having a pit-type dog that is truly, consistently, and for its entire life other-dog friendly is VERY low. This is not a pit-only behavior; I'd say the same thing about many breeds. For these breeds, it is the natural and normal state of the breed to be reactive toward other dogs. Pits (and several other breeds) also have a higher tendency toward what's called predatory drift--a "misfiring" or "bad ending" to a normal interaction. A dog who shows predatory drift begins the interaction as a play experience, using the "play mouth" (lots of biting, but it's severely inhibited and the dog does not ever bite down). But because of a certain number of triggers, the dog switches to a predation ("eating mouth") behavior and kills the other dog.

That tendency, and the fact that the pit-type dogs have been carefully bred specifically to fight other dogs, means that you can have a dog that gets along with others for weeks, months, or years, but one day will decide to remove them from the face of the earth. That's also why the (often incredibly stupid) "temperament testing" that shelters do can label even the majority of pits as "other-dog friendly," because they may very well be extremely relaxed and friendly *on that day,* with no food around and no jealousy and no cat running through the room or whatever. But six months, or two years, later, in a home with a bunch of other dogs, something may very well happen and suddenly there's a dead dog.

There's nothing wrong with having multiple dogs when you have a Pit, or even having multiple Pits (and here, as always, "Pit" means any of the MANY fighting breeds), AS LONG AS you have the experience, wherewithal, and physical ability to keep dogs completely separated for their entire lives. You may never need to use this ability, but if you don't have it and one of the dogs decides to carry a grudge, you will end up abandoning one of the dogs if you cannot keep them separate.

I wish that people would not take the above as a judgment and get defensive about it--dog aggression is not a "bad dog" trait in the breeds that are designed to have it. And it is NOT exclusive to pits; you will have the same experience with a lot of the arctic breeds, some of the Asian breeds like Chow and Shar Pei, many of the terriers, and of course my beloved Danes.

I once had two littermate bitches living with me for about a year while their owners had other commitments. These two girls hated each other implacably, and so we just never let them meet. One went out the basement door while the other was brought in the front. We'd swap who slept in the bedroom, etc. Baby gates were essential. It was a pain, but it became second nature after a while and we never had a real fight. These were not "bad" dogs; they were fabulous dogs. But it is a pretty common thing in the breed and we had to deal with it. That's not the tragedy. The tragedy is if somebody told a novice owner that if you love them enough and raise them right, Danes will be pussycats, and have that owner bring a full-grown Dane to a dog park where there are sixteen dogs running wild in a quarter-acre and then some idiot starts throwing dog biscuits around because it's fun to see the dogs jump for them.
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#72 of 131 Old 03-02-2008, 05:31 PM
 
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Originally Posted by thekimballs View Post
The likelihood of having a pit-type dog that is truly, consistently, and for its entire life other-dog friendly is VERY low. This is not a pit-only behavior; I'd say the same thing about many breeds. For these breeds, it is the natural and normal state of the breed to be reactive toward other dogs.
Yeah, I feel like it's too pessimistic to say 'very low' so I stop short of that, although yes many pit bulls IME are dog aggressive, most I would say, enough that you should definitely assume any pittie you adopt will likely demonstrate the trait.

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Pits (and several other breeds) also have a higher tendency toward what's called predatory drift--a "misfiring" or "bad ending" to a normal interaction. A dog who shows predatory drift begins the interaction as a play experience, using the "play mouth" (lots of biting, but it's severely inhibited and the dog does not ever bite down). But because of a certain number of triggers, the dog switches to a predation ("eating mouth") behavior and kills the other dog.
This is exactly what my dog aggressive pit bull would do (well, minus the killing ). She started off enthusiastic and playful but would soon shift to grabbing the other dog by the neck and would not let go, despite its screaming. (In my own defence I was 19 when I adopted her and didn't know she *was* a pit bull, nevermind what that meant). She actually never broke the skin thank god, but I had 2 or 3 very scary incidents where I could not get her to let go of another terrified dog. I remember one time in desperation punching her in the face as hard as I could, and it was like I was not even there... she just held on.

Absolutely horrible. I soon wised up, found out what she was and what that meant, and we started walking her in the middle of the night and only let her off leash when it was clear there were no dogs. Over time I was able to train her to reliably respond to my commands instead of obeying her urge to approach other dogs, and she could be contained with a kong and her recall when other dogs were nearby.

But dog aggression for her was very, very present, and she was very powerful. She only weighed 55 lbs so was a pretty medium sized pit bull, but she was much stronger than I was and controlling her around other dogs was a pretty important and challenging task.

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That tendency, and the fact that the pit-type dogs have been carefully bred specifically to fight other dogs, means that you can have a dog that gets along with others for weeks, months, or years, but one day will decide to remove them from the face of the earth. That's also why the (often incredibly stupid) "temperament testing" that shelters do can label even the majority of pits as "other-dog friendly," because they may very well be extremely relaxed and friendly *on that day,* with no food around and no jealousy and no cat running through the room or whatever. But six months, or two years, later, in a home with a bunch of other dogs, something may very well happen and suddenly there's a dead dog.
This has not been my own experience, fwiw. My dog aggressive dog was always dog aggressive (well after the 'honeymoon' of a few weeks while she got comfy in my home), and my non dog aggressive pit bull is 11 years old now and is extremely reliably not dog aggressive. In her younger years I did have to watch her around guarding food/toys, and she did have one fight with my other dog (typical canine dominance issues), but she has never been the kind of dog to go looking for a fight with other animals in 'typical' pit bull fashion.

I personally would feel comfortable adding another dog into a situation with a pit bull who has proven itself after the age of maturity to be consistently not aggressive.
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#73 of 131 Old 03-02-2008, 06:19 PM
 
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I'm curious if the OP picked up a dog or a ferrat at the shelter. For us, we would not adopt a pit mix from a shelter or anywhere else. And it is so hard to adopt a dog from the shelter anyways. All the dogs are so stressed that they just keep barking and barking and barking. We adopted two cats from the shelter, but thats a different story. Personally, I would go with a rescue. They get their dogs from the shelters anyways, but there you'll get to see the dog in a more natural environment. We almost adopted a pit mix from a rescue. But decided against it. A friend told me (unfortunately) that pits are breed for agression (dog fights and such). And if its in your genes, its just a very hard thing to deal with. The dogs at our local shelter are 90% pit/pit mix. Just so very sad.
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#74 of 131 Old 03-02-2008, 07:58 PM - Thread Starter
 
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The lady with the two ferrets I wanted lives 2 hours away. : We had planned to maybe pick them up today, but that's a big trip with the gas prices around here, and we ended up not being able to get down there today. She says they're waiting for me whenever I get ready for them, and there is no rush. I live in the middle of nowhere, and sometimes that means traveling to get what I want. (To a petsmart, to the fabric stores, anywhere except, of course, walfart :...) and it really sucks.

This is my last week working, maybe after I finish the week out it would be easier to arrange a day when my husband is off to go and get them, as he is afraid our bobo car would put me down if I was to go down there alone, and would rather that somebody rides with me down there.

I went to the shelter yesterday, I hate this little 2x4 town, because I make great efforts to get there yesterday because it says they are open 10-12. I got there around 11, and they are closed. : : What shelter is closed on Saturday??? And if you ARE closed on Saturday, maybe you should put the DAYS that you are open from 10-12 on the sign!

I saw some boxer/pitts? A couple of hounds, a puppy, and an old laid back chocolate lab with gray around the muzzle that couldn't even be bothered with barking when we pulled up to check them out. The old chocolate lab kinda haunts me, I wanted something mellow and mature, and he seemed extremely couch-potato-ish. I wonder what he's in for.

I thought one of the boxer pitts was pretty, but I liked just how calm and laid back the chocolate lab was.

Of course it would have been nice to at least have some one to ask about them. : I wonder if they are just open monday through friday. I have a habit of strolling my child about a mile away to the park, and it would be nice to have a dog to walk along with us...But I had no intentions of actually adopting yesterday, just checking out everything...
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#75 of 131 Old 03-02-2008, 09:21 PM
 
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I would as long as you know the background and temperment of the dog. We have a 3 year old pit which we got as a puppy pre-baby. She has been awesome with DS. She is very careful and gentle around him, always keeping a close eye out for him. He climbs on her, pulls her ears, tail, pokes her and she just takes it all in stride. Every now and then he'll get assaulted with doggy tongue but that's about it. Pitbulls used to be referred to as "nanny dogs" before the bad hype. They are very hyper and energetic and need an outlet to burn that energy. Lots of playtime, walks and supervision. Any dog can be aggressive, not just pit bulls. they are not all walking time bombs. Where's the pitty love?

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#76 of 131 Old 03-02-2008, 09:34 PM
 
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I would and I did.

We adopted Rizzo when she and DD were both 18 months old. I was leery because of her breed, but she turned out to be the best dog we've ever had, hands down.

Pit bulls are VERY powerful. Powerful jaws, powerful haunches, lots of stamina. And like ANY dog, IMO, they need to be trained. I think owners need a proper understanding and respect of that breeds needs and capabilities, and respond and react accordingly with plenty of exercise and positive stimulation for their dog.

Would I ever let my now 2 year old DD play with the dog unsupervised? Probably not. But I wouldn't let her play unsupervised with any dog, not just a pit bull. 2 year olds can be pretty darn brutal with dogs without meaning to be.


Before this Pit bull, when DH and I were still childless, we adopted a 3-legged red-nosed pit bull that had been used as bait for fighting, and before that, as a puppy mill. We don't know how she lost the leg, but it had been patched up surgically. Her nipples and belly were so distended from having litter after littler that they almost drug on the floor. Her ears were half bitten off, and she had puncture scars all over. It was terrible. But she was a kind and loving dog, good around kids and other animals. Her main issue was during a big commotion (like a fire truck going down the block causing our other two dogs to bark and run around like nuts) she would cower and dribble pee onto the floor, but i can obviously
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#77 of 131 Old 03-03-2008, 12:06 AM
 
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To the original post: short answer... YES! As if my screenname isn't evidence enough. It would depend on the individual dog, of course, as with any breed or creature.

Eventually I'll read through all of these posts. I admit I was SHOCKED at all of the negative responses on the first page. I expect to find people parroting the "daily news negativity" in other places/forums, but not here.

"Childbirth is mind-bogglingly dangerous" = "We'd all be dead without wonderful vaccines" = "Pit bulls are evil/scary/more dangerous than other breeds." All are from the same pit of news-sensationalism.

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#78 of 131 Old 03-03-2008, 01:20 AM
 
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I scanned the previous pages and was so overwhelmed by mis-info and paranoia that I couldn't even find a place to start.

DH and I currently own 2 registered APBTs (American Pit Bull Terriers. I really don't like the catch-all term "pit bull"). One is 8 and one is 3. I have spent my entire life with APBTs... my grandfather was a breeder. I literally have pictures of myself in diapers hugging these dogs. Most people would be hard-pressed to find anyone with more firsthand experience than I have.

Let me just say to begin with, that, of all of the hundreds of APBTs we raised or that passed through our custody, I have NEVER been bitten, nor do I personally know ANYONE of our friends of customers who have. I have never even heard of anyone being attacked, barring news reports, which have their own set of problems, the biggest being that news reports will ALWAYS call a dog a "pit bull" if they think they can get away with it, simply for the dramatic effect. It's far scarier to most people to think of a "pit mix" than a "lab mix," even if said dog is possibly either one.

As someone mentioned before me, APBTs heritage makes them less likely to attack humans than most any other breed. This is precisely because of the fighting history that everyone seems to harp on. In a dog fight, owners would bathe one another's dogs to ensure that there were no chemicals on their coats, or other "cheats." Thus these dogs had to handled by complete strangers, dousing them with water, touching all of their parts. Then, at the end of the actual fight (or training session), the owners had to be able to physically remove their dog from the fight. Go in and physically put their hands on an animal in an all-out rage against another animal. Dogs in general are quite likely to snap at an owner when frustrated at something else (misplaced aggression). APBTs, however, had that trait specifically bred OUT of them over many generations. Some APBT owners I know will not have a mix because they are wary of that genetic safeguard being compromised by the blood of the other breed.

Ok, onto the myth that all "pit bulls" are hulking beasts. Not true. Breed standard for APBTs says a female should weight 50lbs or less; males, 60. My female weighs 50lbs and many people think she must be "a baby." (However, breed standard does not punish for going over weight so long as the dog remains proportional... our male weighs around 100lbs.)

Bedtime for tonight. I'll check back later.

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#79 of 131 Old 03-03-2008, 02:01 AM
 
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I have never been bitten or aggressed upon by a pit bull either (I can think of one I was not comfortable with at a park one time... I'm talking 1995). I do not experience the dogs as unpredictable or aggressive toward people. Poodles yes, pit bulls no. I have nothing but good things to say about pitties and people.
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#80 of 131 Old 03-03-2008, 12:40 PM
 
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nope.
All of my dogs have been rescues, I have always gotten adult dogs, and they have all had some issues. Before kids, not a problem, I could deal with it....but now...with 3 young children, with as much guilt as I feel, I just cant get our next dog from a shelter. I was a vet tech before kids as well, and there are just so many variables with a dog whose history you dont know. I can think of 5 euths off the bat of dogs who were adopted as adults and had aggression issues, or seperation anxiety, or whatever ...there really is only SO much you can do with training. Training can take a dog far, but when there are inherent issues with its temperament, genetics, previous experience, etc...




We are getting a puppy...I specifically chose the breed (english shepherd) for its love of children and helpfulness around the farm. We met the breeder, met the pups parents, and they were both lovely, well mannered dogs who were very sweet with my children.
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#81 of 131 Old 03-03-2008, 03:05 PM
 
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I LOVE pits, but my fear is the damage they can do to a child in seconds. When I was 10 a 12 yr old German Shep with only 6 teeth tore a hole in my hip- through my Toughskins (brings ya back?). I love the bullies, but I'm too nervous about thier power/drives/teeth to risk it around my babe.
But I agree that a rescue is far superior venue to adopt. We found out all sorts of interesting things about our shelter adopted shep/collie mix when we got him home...
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#82 of 131 Old 03-03-2008, 03:20 PM
 
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ANY dog can harm a child. That's why you don't ever leave dogs and kids alone. Honestly, once you get above dachshund size, you're in bad-bite territory; there's no difference between a bad pit bite and a bad collie bite and a bad Lab bite. And among those three, the pit is arguably the least likely to try it.
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#83 of 131 Old 03-03-2008, 04:23 PM
 
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ANY dog can harm a child. That's why you don't ever leave dogs and kids alone. Honestly, once you get above dachshund size, you're in bad-bite territory; there's no difference between a bad pit bite and a bad collie bite and a bad Lab bite. And among those three, the pit is arguably the least likely to try it.
I respectfully disagree about the range of dog bites- rots have 3000 PSI of power in their jaws. Can pits can't be far behind? I'm not bashing the breed, just concerned about the potential risk. Of course its true about pets and supervision, and that ANY dog can harm a child. If my kid gets bit- I'd prefer an annoying little yappy dog to a bully.

This link is about fatalities and doesn't necessarily reflect the behaviors of the kids and dogs at the time of the attack so it's not a great fit for this arguement (ie, did kids bait the dog? was dog properly trained, supervised?), but my point is that powerful dogs can do a lot of damage before anyone can stop them. http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/duip/dogbreeds.pdf

I can't find the site I read it on, but labs were among the top kid biting breed. I assume its because of thier popularity as a family dog and proximity to kids, but let it be known I'm not picking on pits as family dogs...
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#84 of 131 Old 03-03-2008, 04:35 PM
 
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I would and did. He is an awesome dog and part of our family. One thing I will say is that dog obedience and firm rules are important with a strong dog. He is sweet and lovable to everyone. They are a tolerant, kid-loving, sensitive breed.
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#85 of 131 Old 03-03-2008, 04:37 PM
 
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I respectfully disagree about the range of dog bites- rots have 3000 PSI of power in their jaws. Can pits can't be far behind? I'm not bashing the breed, just concerned about the potential risk. Of course its true about pets and supervision, and that ANY dog can harm a child. If my kid gets bit- I'd prefer an annoying little yappy dog to a bully.
...Pomeranians have literally killed babies. "Small" doesn't necessarily equal "safe."

I think what thekimballs is saying is that, once you reach a certain point, PSI doesn't mean a thing. Most anything 20lbs and up could kill a child before you could stop it.

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#86 of 131 Old 03-03-2008, 04:54 PM
 
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I respectfully disagree about the range of dog bites- rots have 3000 PSI of power in their jaws. Can pits can't be far behind?.
Holy cow, no they don't. Dogs bite with between 150-300 *pounds of force* (NOT psi), with large breeds higher on that scale, but there's zero evidence that a Rott or Pit is magnitudes larger than the other breeds or anything even close to that. As any protection trainer can tell you, in general the larger dogs bite harder, so a 100-lb Shepherd is going to bite a lot harder than a 40-lb pit bull. A bite expert will also tell you that the pound-force of the bite is not as important as the depth of the bite, whether the bite is quiet or chaotic, whether there's one bite or several re-bites. That's why you CANNOT make breed assumptions and why you MUST ignore the crazy mythology (Pits have locking jaws, Pits can scissor their teeth, Pits bite at 1800 psi, etc.). A Springer Spaniel who bites seventeen times in an attack is going to do a lot more damage than a pit who bites once.
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#87 of 131 Old 03-03-2008, 05:05 PM
 
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I have a pitbull, we've had him for about 10 or 11 years, he's a member of the family. My uncle bought him in a bar for $80 when he was a puppy because the the guy that was selling Zeus was going to drown him. I have to say that he is AMAZING with children, I used to take him to the beach on a regular basis, and have young kids come to see him, most didn't know to be gentle and would pull his ears or generally be rough with him, and he would just sit there wagging his tail, excited to have made a new friend. He's actually very protective of children, the neighbours 2 doors down were having company, a couple with a small daughter, the parents weren't paying attention and the daughter started running over to our backyard, the father came running after her and when he caught her he raised his hand to spank her and Zeus started growling and being quite angry, I had to tell the man that if he wanted to leave in one piece, he wouldn't hit his kid on my property.

When my niece comes to visit, he sleeps right beside her on the bed, and stays with her until she wakes up. When she was younger and learning to run, if she headed towards the creek in the backyard, he would "herd" her away from it, either by getting between her and the creek, or knocking her down until somebody would move her.

If it was legal, I would totally get another pitbull in a heartbeat, if I was to get one from a shelter, I would try to get as much information on the dogs pre-shelter life first though.

It's funny, I have a list of dogs that I would never want, all of them are small breeds, especially shih tzus, my aunt and uncle have one, and that dog went after my niece totally unprovoked, he almost bit her face, but I was able to grab him and throw him just in time.

*I would never intentionally hurt an animal, but I was protecting a child and if it came down to it, I know all you mamas would do the same.
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#88 of 131 Old 03-03-2008, 06:03 PM
 
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the father came running after her and when he caught her he raised his hand to spank her and Zeus started growling and being quite angry, I had to tell the man that if he wanted to leave in one piece, he wouldn't hit his kid on my property.

....

It's funny, I have a list of dogs that I would never want, all of them are small breeds...
My no-not-ever list is almost entirely small dogs, too.

Your story reminds me of when I was a child... I was outside with one of our APBTs, playing and such. I disobeyed my mom one too many times, and she came at me to spank me. This dog just stood between us, not even looking directly at my mom, but every time my mom would try to step around her, she would move, keeping her body between us. I have found APBTs to be especially sensitive to anger towards or between "their humans" and have repeatedly seen them attempt to "break it up." (I grew up in a very angry and tumultuous household, so I have a lot of experience with this. )

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#89 of 131 Old 03-03-2008, 06:06 PM
 
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Here's one of my "babies" with my friend's baby this weekend:

http://greenblacksheep.blogspot.com/...s-madelyn.html

treehugger.gif SAHM with a precious toddler and the love of my life, expecting a new little one July 2014!
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#90 of 131 Old 03-03-2008, 06:10 PM
 
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Aww, great pic APBTlover! And your comment about the dog's tail cracked me up... this is the secret of pit bulls, what is actually so scary about them. It's not the front end but the back that will do you damage! I've had marks on my legs from being on the wrong end of a very enthusiastic pit bull. And they can clear a coffee table in seconds.

Shhh don't give away the secret...
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