do some kids just need to cry (OR) let's talk naps - Page 4 - Mothering Forums

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Old 10-11-2009, 06:11 PM
 
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My 3 year old still naps every day. Without it, he's the falling down, irrationally behaving crazy man described by PP. So, he naps.

I don't think it's necessarily a bad thing to somewhat force the issue. I don't hold my ds down, but I do require that he stays on his bed for the entire nap time. For him, that's enough that he'll go to sleep. Obviously, he'd prefer to get off his bed, but that's not an option.

And, for those that just suggest an earlier bedtime....for some families that just doesn't work. We have a nap, because my dh doesn't get home until 6 or later every night, and he leaves at 6am. My 3 year old sleeps from 7:30 to 7:30 in the morning, with a 2-3 hour nap. If he skipped his nap, he'd end up in bed by 5 or 5:30, and he'd never see daddy.

For us, it's worth pushing the nap issue a bit, so that he gets to see his dad.
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Old 10-11-2009, 06:51 PM
 
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I wonder why people keep saying over and over that the OP is holding her child down when she explains here that she is holding her in her arms soothing, kissing and rocking her.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sisteeesmama View Post
I really want to get across the idea that I am not holding down to a bed or anything crazy like that, I am just holding her in my arms when she is VISIBLY tired and when she tries to get down I just don't let her and she does get mad but very quickly falls asleep after that drinking her baba while I am holding her in my lap the whole time, soothing her and kissing her and rocking her.
How is this CIO? From my understanding CIO is when a parent leaves a baby alone in their room to cry themselves to sleep without comfort. In no way is what the OP describing CIO.
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Old 10-11-2009, 07:56 PM
 
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I don't think it's my job to make sure my children are never unhappy or never have to do something they don't want to. I think you're doing fine. All kids are different, and while some may be ready to give up that nap at that age, others aren't. My 3.5 year old still seems to need a nap (although not every day).

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Old 10-11-2009, 08:49 PM
 
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Originally Posted by sisteeesmama View Post
I really wonder if the crying expends that last little bit of energy that then helps her to relax and fall asleep, or is that just wishful justifying??
i find this is true for my dd, it's like she needs something to push against to get to sleep. she kicks covers off, she pushes her head into the pillow, etc. i think that me holding her just allows her to push against me.


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I really don't see how encouraging to continue to hold her DD for 15 minutes while she fights and screams is AP!
i thought AP parenting was about meeting your child's needs. if the child is falling asleep for 1-1/2 hours after this it sounds like she needs the sleep.

i'll be honest, i think you are taking an extreme view of CIO and i don't think that this qualifies.

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Old 10-11-2009, 09:24 PM
 
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I don't know about the other posters, but my DS1 didn't (for a time) just fight naps. He fought sleep in general. Whether he napped or not determined the level of fight he'd throw at bedtime - if he nappped (with help) he went to sleep at 8:30-9pm *MUCH* easier than if he didn't, in which case he would be positvely miserable and scream and run and cry becaue he was *SO* overtired and he KNEW if he stopped moving for a moment he WOULD fall asleep. So he just would NOT stop moving. He still does this to a degree, but its not nearly as awful as it was for about a month or two ~20-22 months. Should I have just let my DS be miserable and run around and be uber hyper untill he literally passed out?? Would that be preferable to some of you on here vs, simply stopping him, changin his diaper and then holding him till he stopped moving so that he WOULD fall asleep?? You would rather you, and your DC both be utterly miserable because he/she was SO over tired for 2 or 3 hours before they just passed out??
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Old 10-11-2009, 09:53 PM
 
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yeah, i'm not sure if we just have vastly different kids or what but it seems like there are very different approaches to this.

i personally can't see the benefit to having a craxy dd stumbling around like a zombie either.

and fwiw, my ds transitioned to no naps without a hitch so i don't buy the idea that it will take weeks of adjustment to the no nap routine. i knew he was ready because he could go the entire day without acting like he was tired or needed sleep.

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Old 10-12-2009, 01:27 AM
 
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I had to hold and rock my ds to sleep at night and for naps from 4 months on. And he'd cry because he knew if I was rocking him that it was sleep time. But I just kept rocking and soothing until he fell asleep. It never took very long...because he was always tired and ready for bed when I did it.

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Old 10-12-2009, 01:34 AM
 
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Originally Posted by AverysMomma View Post
I agree 100% with what pioyt had to say....if I wouldn't do it to my DH or want someone to do it to me...I don't do it.


We have never ever had a routine sleep time/nap schedule or anything like that...people in our house sleep when they are tired, wake up when they are ready to to play or work again and eat when they're hungry, etc...we just don't fight about sleep around here...but maybe DD is just "one of those kids" who sleeps well...I don't know, we have never had a problem.

I believe that the body knows when it needs to shut down and recharge, just like it knows when it needs to refuel...there have been times when DD has been so tired she could hardly walk straight...but if I tried to suggest sleep to her she wasn't game and became upset...so, generally, she tells me when she needs to go to sleep and THOSE times when I bring her to the big bed to lay down she sighs and giggles and wiggles her feet....so, I don't know. I would rather promote a relationship with sleep that has her giggling and toe wiggling than wailling....I know a lady with a son who won't even go into his room to play because he won't go near his crib, if he even SEES his crib he starts freaking out, I'm guessing because he thinks he is about to be forced to go to sleep and he knows that it will mean crying and struggling, etc...that's terrible. I would hate to have a kid who associated his place of rest and dreaming with fear, crying and upset.


Sistees, someone above said it best "You know your childs needs the best" - so...do what your gut is telling you to do I guess...I agree with a PP who said that sometimes kids in that age range are too "thirsty for life" to want to go to sleep when they're tired...I remember when I was a kid being like that with the bathroom...my body was clearly telling me I needed to go to the bathroom but I didn't want to go inside because I was having too much fun playing...so, a couple of times that ended up being a not-so-great decision, if you know what I mean!
Great post! Thank you!

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Old 10-12-2009, 01:38 AM
 
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Being attached to our children doesn't mean making our entire world revolve around preventing them from ever being frustrated. It's not even possible nor would it be healthy if it was. Holding a child snuggly in your arms and cuddling them while fuss before sleeping is no different than wearing them until they get to sleep. It's no different than swaddling. I found "crying in arms" reference (not in a negative way) on the API website and IMNSHO being an attached parent means that you "learn" YOUR child and help them get to where they need to be. It means not following a book or a set of rules to the T while neglecting the needs of YOUR child.

Take care and good luck.
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Old 10-12-2009, 02:14 AM
 
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OP, I totally understand and think you are doing an awesome job. My oldest fought sleep, any sleep, from the time she was born. I mean, she NEVER wanted to sleep! I even went as far as taking "sleep issues" classes aimed at young infants and children. When she was over tired and finally passed out she would get up an have sleep terrors. She'd sit up and scream bloody murder while asleep and then get up and RUN through a dark house and hide, it wasn't safe. We had to start putting up gates in front of doors and such. We'd find her wedged behind the fridge or in closets, the oddest places. She was so over tired her body flipped out when she finally would fall asleep. I finally gave in and started rocking her and cuddling her as she cried. It broke my heart but it did help her fall asleep and assured she got ENOUGH sleep. She got lots of love and her last little burst of crying was the stimulation she needed to finally relax her body.

She is now 10 years old and has never outgrown her sleep issues. She is now old enough to recognize them herself and has requested help dealing with it. She knows she needs sleep and her body STILL, to this day, can't regulate sleep correctly. With the approval from her pediatrician she takes melatonin tablets at bedtime when she is having an extremely hard time. Her body just doesn't "wind down" like most and all the quiet time and schedules in the world have never helped her.

My sister's little girl is the same way. She is one years old and fights sleep. She takes one mini nap during the day (she fights all naps and that's the best that my sister has managed) and then at night she is so over tired that she simply can't fall asleep. I've seen my sister sit with her for nearly 2 hours doing quiet time trying to get her to sleep when she so obviously needed it. When my sister was so exhausted she was losing patience I stepped in to help. With my sister's approval I held her and cuddled her (my niece) and she cried for literally 3 minutes and then fell into a deep sound sleep.

Each and every child is different and has different needs. My youngest was the sleeping queen. To this day she still puts herself to sleep and sleeps really well, she always has. My middle child was pretty typical and my oldest still has trouble sleeping. I've run the gambit when it comes to sleep issues. I find cuddling and holding a child while giving them kisses and talking sweetly to them is VERY different than CIO where you leave the room and offer no reassurances.

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Old 10-12-2009, 03:17 AM
 
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I guess I'm seeing this as kind of like bear hugging a kid in a raging tantrum so that they can't hurt themselves, others, or destroy anything. They're certainly not going to be happy about it, but that doesn't mean that it's not a valid way of dealing with it for *some* kids; some kids they need that physical boundary to help them gain physical and emotional control when they are out of control.

I don't think any of the mamas here are jumping up and down with glee at the thought of making their child upset, or preventing them from getting off their laps or out of their arms...but in some cases, it's the kindest thing to do - I just don't see what's respectful about letting a child who is obviously NOT picking up on their body's sleep cues get so overtired that they are unable to fall asleep or get enough sleep - that doesn't sound respectful or kind to me.

I don't envision this being done in a "mwahahahaaaa, you little creep, now I'm going to show you that you WILL sleep no matter what it is you want to do, becasue I'm the boss..." kind of tone, but something more like, "I know you want to keep playing (or whatever) - your body needs sleep to stay healthy and grow, and since you aren't able to hold still right now to fall asleep, I'm going to help you stay still for a few minutes until your body can rest." I just - I know that there are kids out there that just don't want to sleep, don't recognize their sleep cues, and don't want to miss out on one single minute of awake play time. I have two of them. I *have* in fact said those words to both of them..."if you'll just keep your body still for a couple minutes, I know that you'll fall asleep" - and fortunately, they've eventually listened and fallen asleep. But I can completley conceive of a kid who wouldn't and would keep getting up, etc. but who clearly still needed the sleep. Sleep is SO important, SO important. Reading "Sleepless in America" made me see just hwo important it is. And I would agree that you cannot *make* a child sleep - but if they fall asleep after being upset for a little bit and sleep like a rock for a couple hours, then they clearly still *need* the sleep, whether or not they *want* it.

I'm not doing backflips about restraining an upset, overtired child - if you can find a better, gentler way that still gets them the sleep they need, then great...but I'm also not going to condemn it and put it in the same league as abandoning a child in a dark room.

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Old 10-12-2009, 02:01 PM
 
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I'm not doing backflips about restraining an upset, overtired child - if you can find a better, gentler way that still gets them the sleep they need, then great...but I'm also not going to condemn it and put it in the same league as abandoning a child in a dark room.
Absolutely.

If a child isn't reading their body's cues, it's our job, as parents, to do it for them. My kids have been so utterly wiped out that they can't function. Going to bed (bigger kids) or sleep (littlest) is what is needed.

I've been known to pop ds2 in his carseat and drive him around till he fell asleep because he NEEDED it.

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Old 10-12-2009, 05:08 PM
 
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I can actually remember sitting around doing this or that and just sobbing and freaking out and my mom saying "time for bed. you are over tired" and screaming back "no I am not" looking back if she had wrestled me to the ground and held me down while I got the sleep I needed I would not have been dissapointed. I would have prefered that to her getting angry or frustrated at my exhausted craziness (not that I blame her for getting angry or frustrated either.)

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Old 10-12-2009, 05:12 PM
 
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As long as we're using childhood anecdotes, my mom tied me into bed for this same reason - she said I was desperately tired and needed sleep but wouldn't sleep unless I was forced to stay put. I think holding a child down in bed is better than tying a child into bed, but really they're degrees of the same thing, IMO.
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Old 10-12-2009, 05:25 PM
 
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OP---

have I missed what else you have tried? I know that some children, from birth, need to be swaddled to be able to calm down and go to sleep. But, to me, it seems like if this becomes as issue as a child approaches 2 perhaps they are trying to transition out of the nap. Have you tried more morning activities, an earlier wake up time or an earlier bedtime (and eliminate nap)?

I would be concerned that DD is actually learning that her screaming/crying is not being listened to. Just because a child falls asleep after screaming and thrashing around does not, IMO, mean that they needed a nap in the first place. They could just be hopeless and exhausted from trying to escape. I don't know which one your DD is (because I do know that both exist, DS, especially has been to a point where he wanted to nurse and sit up, nurse and sit up, nurse and sit up, but if I pulled him tight to me while he nursed so he wasn't waking himself up with his movements he would settle right down), of course.

 

 

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Old 10-12-2009, 08:48 PM
 
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lets not over look that we are talking about five minutes of squirming and fussing. Not a hour of thrashing and wailing. its a small protest.

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Old 10-12-2009, 08:49 PM
 
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As long as we're using childhood anecdotes, my mom tied me into bed for this same reason - she said I was desperately tired and needed sleep but wouldn't sleep unless I was forced to stay put. I think holding a child down in bed is better than tying a child into bed, but really they're degrees of the same thing, IMO.
i think that's pretty creepy.

how do you feel about holding and rocking a crying child?

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Old 10-12-2009, 08:51 PM
 
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lets not over look that we are talking about five minutes of squirming and fussing. Not a hour of thrashing and wailing. its a small protest.
Actually, from the OP we're talking about more like 15 minutes of hard crying.
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Old 10-12-2009, 11:30 PM
 
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i think that's pretty creepy.

how do you feel about holding and rocking a crying child?
Fine, if the child is wanting to be held and rocked. I've done it lots. I haven't forced a child to sit on my lap when she didn't want to.
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Old 10-12-2009, 11:30 PM
 
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Not entering the debate about whether it's right or wrong but I wanted to give you my take friend
My kids start to give up their naps around that age. It's not always permanent, sometimes they skip days and then pass out for hours, sometimes they just end up sleeping late. Sometimes they cut naps for a while then go back to them. I've seen so much variance with naps, I tend to just go with their feelings. My 13mo nurses to sleep and when I know she's tired I will nurse her and not let her get down. She fusses and then latches back on and goes to sleep. I don't feel that I'm harming her, she's really not upset. I might be able to force my 2yo to take a nap by holding her and not letting her up but frankly that's just never crossed my mind. She doesn't nap anymore, she now goes to sleep about 1.5 hours before the rest of us and sleeps as late as we do. I'd say, you are there, you SEE her and can feel how upset she is and what effect it's having on her and your lives in general. You've got good instincts, go with your gut, mama.

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Old 10-13-2009, 01:23 AM
 
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Old 10-16-2009, 08:22 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I'm baaaaaaaaaack. Lol.

Anyway. I wrote a long response the other day but when I went to post it it got deleted some how. Anyway. It was REALLY long and I just didn't have the ooomph to write it again and so here I am.

I have appreciated everyone's responses and have thought a lot about what everyone has said.

This is not something I am taking lightly, for sure.

HEre are my thoughts and responses to questions others have asked.

I have tried other things, this has been the only thing that has gotten her to stop.relax(eventually).chill.sleep.
I do take her to lots of morning activities and t the park so I think she is getting enough stimulation in the morning.
I have now tried moving up her naptime to no success at all so that is a no-go.
My real concern is that as a mom I can't handle her when she gets overtired/starts acting frantic/manic is unable to be pleased and just obviously needs to go to sleep. It makes me feel stressed out and I become a worse mom. I am more prone to snap or just tune out and then the whole day becomes a wash where I am just waiting for DH to get home and not conntecting anymore with DD. It's a mess.
I strongly connect with the moms who are saying that its obvious when a baby needs a nap and to me this baby still needs her naps.

When I said in my OP that I didn't want to give them up the truth is that no, I personally don't want to give up the time where she rests.recharges.and wakes up refreshed. It is so much more peacefull than living in crazyland where she is acting like a possessed nutball.

I also connected to the pp who said that if a baby/kid didn't need a nap anymore wouldn't it stand to reason that they would be acting like they don't?

Thanks to everyone
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Old 10-16-2009, 09:49 PM
 
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I think you're doing a great job responding to your baby's needs. It's soooo sad as a mama to hear your baby cry, but it sounds like she's so much happier in the end if she gets the naps she needs (let's see....a few minutes of protest vs. several miserable hours at the end of the day). I really, really think you're doing the right thing.
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Old 10-17-2009, 02:27 AM
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Sure, I did it. My DS NEVER EVER EVER could read his sleep cues. He would still stay up until forever if we didn't make him stop and go to sleep. He still fights, there's just no crying involved. A crying child doesn't necessarily NOT need sleep, they are just fighting it tooth and nail. Mine just can't seem to get his body relaxed on his own.

He gave up his naps for good around 2 and change, so around that time, we were fighting it pretty hard. I turned on some soft music, put away every single toy from sight, rocked him in a dark room, and he would still whimper a little before he drifted off. I think it was around that time that I realized that he knew what "nap" meant, so I started calling it rest time or quiet time or something, and he didn't fight quite as hard. I also found this horribly boring book (he still calls it the night-night book) and read it in the most monotone voice I could possible muster. It gave him something to take his mind off of what we were doing, but he would usually fall asleep a few pages in.

Best of luck. Giving up naps was torture for us, but hallelujah, he goes to bed at 7 w/o a fight now.
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Old 10-17-2009, 07:09 AM
 
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I don't want to touch the CIO/not CIO debate with a 10 foot pole.

I will chime in to say that both of my kids started to resist sleep at this age and sleep became irregular. DS is in the middle of this phase right now.

Since we allow our kids to self regulate, I see it as my job to help my kids get to sleep when they are telling me it's time. For my DS this means rubbing his eyes, asking to be held and nurse, laying on the floor, getting whiny and cranky.

Since he is in a very distractable phase too (which is probably why he resists sleep in the first place) I will bring him into the quiet, boring bedroom and lay down with him. I can no longer read or play around on my iPhone while he nurses down, it's just to distracting. Sometimes he will nurse and close his eyes and then just when the soft snoring starts, pop up and want to wrestle. Then after a few minutes of playing he nurses and falls a sleep. There are other times when he just needs the quiet rest that comes from nursing and he's good for another hour or 2. Sometimes, particularly at night, DS needs to fuss a bit before settling down to nurse. He usually goes to sleep very quickly when this happens. Unless he has been sick, he has never cried during this process. Fuss yes, but not cried.

DS no longer gets tiered and naps at predictable times. I see this as a sign that he is starting the process of dropping a daily nap. Like every thing else, the process is not a simple linear one. He still obviously needs a nap some days, and others not so much. I do my best to respect this and help him get the rest he needs without forcing the issue because I need a break (and believe me, there are days I really do...usually the days that are a no go for naps, unfortunately.)

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Old 10-17-2009, 09:06 AM
 
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WRT the 'physical restraint' thing - we all physically restrain our children during the day, whether we think of it like that or not. We hold down a squirming baby to change a poopy nappy, we put a protesting child into a car seat, we hold a toddler's hand in the supermarket. We physically restrain them inside the house by using doors, windows, walls, locks, etc. We physically prevent them from playing with dangerous things using doors, locks, removing the items, etc. If our child was hurting themselves or another person we would all agree that it was our responsibility to physically prevent them from doing so.

The baby/child involved is often not best pleased with our physical restraint, but is usually better off in general - i.e. not sitting in a mass of faeces for hours on end, not dead or badly injured. Overall, healthier and happier for the 'physical restraint' despite being unimpressed and protesting vociferously at the time. I doubt there's a mama out there whose baby hasn't at some point thrown a wobbler because she's had to prevent him from doing something he wanted to do, or put him somewhere he didn't want to be.

Some children are indeed poor regulators of sleep. I was, and my DD is too. It is in fact harmful to her (and me) healthwise and safety-wise to allow her to disregard her need for sleep. Left to her own devices she would have slept for about 2 hours in 24 and screamed and cried the other 22. I know, because in my desperation to be a good parent I tried to 'follow her cues'. That's where it got us - with me so exhausted that I was really unfit to be caring for an infant and her incredibly over-wrought and over-tired, unable to function, and constantly screaming or crying. So I had to wonder: what was worse - allowing her to do this to herself, aka 'following her cues' or 'respecting her bodily integrity', or finding a more proactive way to help her to sleep when she very obviously did need to? The first meant that she literally would be screaming/crying just about non-stop for hours on end until she finally conked out of sheer exhaustion, then would wake up after 30 minutes to start all over again. The second meant that she cried in my arms, while I rocked, shushed, sang to her, gently explained to her that she needed to settle down and go to sleep, and stilled her constantly moving body. In this scenario she rarely cried for more than 10 minutes and would usually sleep for a couple of hours before waking, would wake reasonably happy and alert and play quite happily, interact normally and generally do normal baby things for an hour or two until she started to get tired again. (I'm talking now about when she was still an infant)

Kids will protest against physical restraint. They should - it's good that they test boundaries and figure things out, but we shouldn't put all the responsibility for their well-being onto them. If you could only change a baby's nappy when they happily permitted you to, well then you'd have a serious problem on your hands. An adult would recognise that although they didn't want to have their nappy changed it was a necessary evil which would overall keep them happier and healthier, but a baby can't be expected to understand that.

I don't see these things as being the equivalent of CIO at all. CIO is about meeting the parents' wants/desires at the expense of the kids' needs. CIO is about the absence of love, caring, reassurance. CIO is about breaking a kid's spirit and teaching them that no one cares what they need or want. Helping an over-tired, over-active kid to sleep by physically stopping them from moving so much they keep themselves awake is about the kid's need, not the parents'. It's about helping keep that kid healthy and happy overall, even if he's not too impressed right now.

FWIW - I had to 'physically restrain', aka lovingly hold and rock my DD to sleep for almost all of her naps and night-time sleeps for her first year, and about half of them for the next 6 months. I never left her to CIO, and she never slept more than 1-2 hours at a stretch for her entire first year, and even now at 22 months still wakes 3-4 times a night. But she has gradually stopped fighting sleep so much - she'll now tell me she wants to go to bed. She enjoys the snuggling and closeness, and often now when she gets really wiggly and can't settle she'll actually *ask* me to rock her to sleep and even though she wiggles while I rock her she wants me to help her to sleep, and will often be out within a couple of minutes of rocking. I think for a kid who has a lot of difficulty self-regulating, switching off and stopping moving to go to sleep, she's now got a healthy attitude towards it. She knows she needs sleep, and she recognises when she needs help to get to sleep.

I also don't think naps are about a parent's convenience - my life would actually be a lot easier if I didn't need to get home for a few hours in the middle of every day. (DD can't sleep for more than a few minutes out and about, so we need to be home for nap-time)

OP - only you can know for sure about your DD. You know best if she's really trying to drop naps and if you need to try to facilitate that for her, or if she's just fighting sleep and really needs the help to sleep. Given that you said that she used to go to sleep just fine, and has now started to to fight sleep I would guess that she's getting ready to transition out of her nap (as opposed to those kids who fight sleep all their lives as a matter of course). My personal inclination would be to try out no naps for a week or two and if it really wasn't working then to re-evaluate what could be done at that stage, but like I said I don't know your situation or your DD, so you're the best judge of that.

Lisa - mama to Eleanor Rose 01/08 and Saoirse Lily 09/10
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Old 10-17-2009, 09:47 AM
 
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I'm all for trying to facilitate sleep for an exhausted kid, but I wouldn't be comfortable holding a nearly 2 year old still who wanted to get down. It just seems like there has to be some kind of more agreeable solution.

What has worked well for my kids is routine, routine, routine and a consistent schedule. This has worked especially well for my daughter. My son is a bit more challenging, but we're making progress.

ETA - In regards to crying, I think there is a big difference in a crying infant who is having a hard time transitioning to sleep and a nearly 2 year old who is crying and mad because she wants to get down and doesn't want to take a nap. The children are at completely different developmental stages and shouldn't be treated the same IMO.

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Old 10-20-2009, 06:47 AM
 
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I haven't read all of the replies, but I have a (almost) 20 month old son who still takes one nap in the afternoon. He sleeps in a crib (his choice - he has always slept better in there and likes it) and if I know he's tired but having some trouble winding down I will put him in there with some books or a few toys to play with in addition to his bottle. He usually "reads" to himself or plays for a little while (10 minutes or less) and then lays down when he's ready and falls asleep. He usually doesn't cry, but if he does, (of course) I go in to see what's wrong. Usually he will want more milk, need a diaper change or want a toy that he accidentally dropped. Once I've fixed whatever it is, he goes to sleep. Occasionally he just wants some attention and then we play pattycake or sing a song or something and then he goes right out. He seems to need that 10 minute "wind down" period. I figure it is the same as me - I always go to bed when I'm tired but read for about 10 minutes or use my laptop.
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Old 10-20-2009, 03:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sisteeesmama View Post
I also connected to the pp who said that if a baby/kid didn't need a nap anymore wouldn't it stand to reason that they would be acting like they don't?
There is a transition period where the child still needs to rest during the middle of the day but has trouble going to sleep because they are ready to give up their nap. It doesn't matter at what age your child gives up their nap you're going to have an over tired child for a few weeks while their body adjusts.

We've always let our DD regulate her own sleep. When she was getting ready to drop her nap the amount of time she was awake between sleep periods kept increasing. When she had to be up for 8 hours before she could go to sleep we dropped the naps because there is just not 28 hours in a day. For several weeks our DD was grumpy and tantrumy and sometimes hyper during those last 2 or 3 hours before bed. Then she'd sleep 11 or 12 hours.
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