When your kids disappoint you? - Mothering Forums

When your kids disappoint you?

Oriole's Avatar Oriole (TS)
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what do you do?
How do you cope? I know it can happen at any age, but probably harder to handle with an older child, as you feel like your values should be there by now, and it's as if you failed to teach them kindness?

I am not talking about disappointment by not getting into Harvard Law school, but more along the lines of not acting with kindness towards others, or being drawn to materialistic side vs. genuine?

Please share.
CatsCradle's Avatar CatsCradle
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Oriole: are you asking this because of present personal experience with this or out of fear/curiosity that it may happen in the future?

If the latter, I think we all fear that our children may stray from our own values systems. I think that is what makes parenting so hard. We desparately want our children to enter larger society with the qualities and values that we hold dear. I don't think this is something new. Parents have probably been plagued with these fears since the beginning of time.

I think that if your child, who is still under your care, does something that disappoints you, it is a great opportunity to discuss the broader implications of your child's behavior with your child. I think the most valuable lessons of my life (especially growing up) were those learned when I strayed outside the value systems that were important to my parents. Once a child is outside your care, however, I suppose it would be heartbreaking to see them become a person that exhibits qualities that are in contrast to our own values. We can only do our best with the short time that we have them.
DariusMom's Avatar DariusMom
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I'm afraid I've been too harsh with my DS (7). He's usually been such a great, compassionate, sweet kid that when he's disappointed me (being less than caring and generous to other kids, saying mean things to his best friend and to other kids), I've been so shocked that I've been borderline mean myself! In one case, I even told him I was ashamed of him.

I've then calmed down and spoken to him about what his behavior triggered in me, why I felt like that, and how he might have felt if someone had acted towards him the way he acted towards them.

Would love to hear good insights and tips from other parents. Thanks, OP, for this thread.
meemee's Avatar meemee
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oriole i havent gone thru this yet coz my dd's only 7....

but i have thought about this. many times.

and here's how i care to look at the situation.

my dd has nothing to do with me. i provided a womb to come to this world. when she is young i am her guide. i give her options. she chooses.

as she grows old she decides for herself.

so if i have taught her to be kind - and she turns out to be the greatest *itch - it is what she chose.

right now i am dealing with this with my roommate and his almost 18 year old son. his son was just caught shoplifting - a watermelon.

his dad is all bent out of shape.

but i can see it is a rite of passage. doesnt mean he is on his way to become a criminal.

but his dad cant see it.

so by the time dd is a teenager and/or young adult, i hope what i see as 'disappointments' i can put in perspective. the mistakes we make while learning on the way.

yeah i will be disappointed dd didnt turn out the way i would have like her to have turned out ....

but it isnt about my failure. it is more about my child's choices. and also about timing. late teens we all do stupid things. but around 24/25 when finally the frontal lobe is fully developed do we really come into who we really are.

before that age all we can do as parents is survive by the seat of our pants.
MusicianDad's Avatar MusicianDad
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My children haven't disappointed me, and I doubt they could. I may dislike their actions at times, but they as people are not a disappointment. I am very careful about distinguishing the person from the action, especially in regards to people I know when they do something otherwise out of character.

Meemee, perhaps your friend needs help looking into life-course persistent offenders vs. adolescent limited offenders... Because chances are his son is the latter.
DariusMom's Avatar DariusMom
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meemee View Post
oriole i havent gone thru this yet coz my dd's only 7....
I have a 7 year old and I have been disappointed in his behavior at times.


Quote:
Originally Posted by meemee View Post
my dd has nothing to do with me. i provided a womb to come to this world. when she is young i am her guide. i give her options. she chooses.

as she grows old she decides for herself.

so if i have taught her to be kind - and she turns out to be the greatest *itch - it is what she chose.
But of course she has something to do with you. She is half yours genetically. And, even if you don't believe that genetics plays the larger role in determining behavior and character, you have raised her (or "guided" her, if you prefer that terminology). You have provided the living environment and much of the stimuli that has shaped her by the home you have chosen, the people with whom you have put her in contact, etc. How can you say she has nothing to do with you?

I do get that you believe your daughter has choices, especially as she gets older. I believe the same about my son. But, if, as your example posits, she becomes a *itch because she chose to be, wouldn't you feel disappointment? Wouldn't you feel that you would rather she had become kind, loving, and caring?

Quote:
Originally Posted by meemee View Post
so by the time dd is a teenager and/or young adult, i hope what i see as 'disappointments' i can put in perspective. the mistakes we make while learning on the way.
I agree with you here. I would be disappointed but hope I could put it in perspective.



Quote:
Originally Posted by MusicianDad View Post
My children haven't disappointed me, and I doubt they could. I may dislike their actions at times, but they as people are not a disappointment. I am very careful about distinguishing the person from the action, especially in regards to people I know when they do something otherwise out of character.
Sure. I agree. But my take on what the OP was saying was not some sort of intrinsic disappointment in the ultimate character of the child (though maybe that's what she meant?) but, rather, disappointing behavior at any given moment or period of time.
Oriole's Avatar Oriole (TS)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MusicianDad View Post
My children haven't disappointed me, and I doubt they could. I may dislike their actions at times, but they as people are not a disappointment. I am very careful about distinguishing the person from the action, especially in regards to people I know when they do something otherwise out of character.

Meemee, perhaps your friend needs help looking into life-course persistent offenders vs. adolescent limited offenders... Because chances are his son is the latter.
Would you not be disappointed if they hurt another person on purpose?

I do not mean to imply that your children have it in them, but I am curious what other people do.

We have a very big trial going on in the area, four teenagers broke into a house, killed the mother and almost killed a child (she survived). Certainly the parents of these teens did not see this coming? Who can predict something like this?

I see one child bully another, and some parents will ignore it with excuses, and some will have a discussion about treating others with kindness, but in the moment - it can't feel good to know that's YOUR child is bullying another.

Are you certain that your children will never say a cruel remark to another person? Will never make fun of anyone? I hope you are right, but I guess I am asking for a perspective of those who can imagine that possibility, and would like to know beyond discussing things with your kid, how would you move on internally?

Kindness is very important quality for me in a person. I get the trial and error of growing up, and DSD acts with great kindness sometimes, but I have also seen a mean streak. I guess I hope that the kind side wins before she is all grown up, but I worry - what if it won't? kwim?
meemee's Avatar meemee
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hah oriole. i read this just last night after i replied to your post. written by a psychologist. however as a spiritual person i dont buy into this.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/13/health/13mind.html
GuildJenn's Avatar GuildJenn
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Well if we're talking about being mean sometimes, I think pretty much everyone has that in them - and for good reason; sometimes you do get into a situation where you have to be unkind.

I had someone bothering my son quite a bit (in a creepy way) and I felt it was important to make it extremely clear right then that he had to cut it out. Although I'm certainly not proud of the times in my life I've been unkind, they were in a sense 'practice' for when it is needed.

Also sometimes it's necessarily. When my son had appendicitis and was in hospital afterwards with tubes everywhere and in discomfort, he was extremely angry and he was definitely withholding affection and being a bit mean. I was glad to see it because to me it was his fighting spirit keeping his self save in a very hard situation. There are times to learn about kindness and times to let it go.

So I see the times that kids are unkind to each other as critical learning times to be embraced - first to help them learn not to be and to stop, and second to allow them to experience their inner power and hardness that they might need at some point. Not to be too trite about it but you can't have light without darkness and all that.

That said I think it is possible for kids to develop their own ideas and personality traits that don't align with their parents' values. And at some point it becomes about accepting that we only control so much.

I don't have direct experience with that as a parent but as a child I certainly know there are things my relatives do and have done that I don't respect or agree with. In that case I see it as my role to set good boundaries, and in some cases to keep the discussion open, but also to love them anyway. I hope I would do the same for my own children.

In the case of something horrific like a murder I think it's probably the kind of thing you just can't understand until you are there. I'd hope I would both be horrified and support justice while still loving my child, but I also suspect there would be many small damages to the relationship along the way and that each situation is really unique.
meemee's Avatar meemee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oriole View Post
Kindness is very important quality for me in a person. I get the trial and error of growing up, and DSD acts with great kindness sometimes, but I have also seen a mean streak. I guess I hope that the kind side wins before she is all grown up, but I worry - what if it won't? kwim?
but oriole isnt that the duality of nature?

if you asked my ex he would say i am a *itch.

if you asked my mom she would say i am the angriest person on earth. we have a rocky relationship.

if you asked my anthro study group - a bunch of us who have been together for the past 6 weeks - i am the nicest person ever. i am helpful, kind and really open minded and they can come to me for anything including a shoulder to cry on as they deal with relationship breakup.

4 teenagers breaking in an almost killing a mom and child.

would i blame teh parents for not doing a good job? is that the first thought that would come to my mind? nope. i would wonder woah. were those kids under the influence of drugs?

if that was my dd i would be horrified. disappointed? no. because i am only one of her 'guidance'. she has many more. who she listens to at that moment has nothing to do with me. she could go into the crowd mentality and join them. who knows.

of course my dd has been a pill. even at 7. has she disappointed me. NO!!!! never!!!! its such a harsh strong word. why does she always have to be on her best behaviour? dunno. she is mostly gracious.

MD - the dad himself is at a hard place in his head. i have to tread softly and gently for him to get the point. and what i am grateful for is that he is seeing the other side of his son as he watches his son interact with me. apparently all the others bring out the bad in him. i dont. i guess unlike the others i dont think he's a bad apple. just that he's a good kid gone astray. and i believe in the good in him. his dad is not open to seeing that side of his son yet - in words. in actions yes. not in words. kwim.
Oriole's Avatar Oriole (TS)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meemee View Post
but oriole isnt that the duality of nature?
.
I guess, but at what point "the duality of nature" no longer holds the excuse for cruelty?
laohaire's Avatar laohaire
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In the situation of the teens breaking in (and I don't even want to finish the rest) I think I would disown my child. It's hard for me to imagine, though, because I'm just picturing strange teens, not my own precious daughter. I still think that I could not live with that and I don't know what I would do if I saw something like that coming (violent preteen or teen). Military school would probably be a big consideration. I'm not into that but if I thought my kid was a psychopath or needed extra discipline, I think military school might provide the structure they need. I am raising my child to do what's right because it's right, and not because she'll be punished otherwise - but some people don't understand right from wrong, and fear of punishment is the only thing that keeps them in line.

As far as smaller disappointments, like being mean to another person or maybe sneaking money or cigs from a purse or lying or being extremely materialistic... I can only think of a mantra of my mother's:

"She (or he) is not done yet."

I've said things and done things I regret, but I've grown up enough to regret it. I am not the same person who said/did those things anymore. I could still do or say the wrong thing, but that's because I'm still not "done" yet - we grow all our lives.
meemee's Avatar meemee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oriole View Post
I guess, but at what point "the duality of nature" no longer holds the excuse for cruelty?
i would like to hope that i would be like the swedes when it comes to this.

even a murderer is given a chance.

it might be a momentary madness. whatever the reason.

and the murderers are in some way taken back into society.

but cruelty. no i would not hold myself responsible for it.

are you saying all the criminals of the world are due to bad parenting, or that parents have a key role to play? if you say that parents do have a huge role to play.

if one of those kids had been my dd, i would have turned her over to authorities and then visited her in jail regularly. no matter what she does she is still that little baby i held in my arms. i just cant forget that.
Marsupialmom's Avatar Marsupialmom
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Honestly, it depends on what they have done and ages and stages.

Sometimes our disappointment is best not known. Like, if my children were to join the military. I would be disappointed but my kids won't know that! -- Military families please understand I am third generation military and I want a different life for my kids than I had.

Sometimes, the act of unkindness and disappointment means you need to speak up and take more time teaching. We sometimes have ideas that our children will do or know something and they don't. Sometimes we have to remember our kids are kids and they will do stupid things that in time they will be remorseful for, that is part of growing. Sometimes, they are kids and will simply make mistakes.

Sometimes it is the child's age. If my almost 10 year old said something homophobic, I would be disappointed. But I would minimize my disappointed and use the situation to teach. Were as my almost 16 year old would get a different response. My almost 16 year was in a situation last year that another person was being homophobic. There was a part of me that was disappointed that he did not speak up and acted as he did to that person but the other part of me that was happy that he confided in us so we could help him negotiate the situation. In hind-site, I understand his fear of speaking up right then when stuff was happing but he did reach out to help rectify the situation. Now if my child 20 and homophobic then I would let my disappointment be known.
Oriole's Avatar Oriole (TS)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by laohaire View Post
I

As far as smaller disappointments, like being mean to another person or maybe sneaking money or cigs from a purse or lying or being extremely materialistic... I can only think of a mantra of my mother's:

"She (or he) is not done yet."
I think I need this kind of mantra collection.
Maybe I just have anxiety issues?

I'm not implying that I consider a child that did something wrong "done", or that I find them a hopeless case undeserving a second chance. I am also not quick to blame the parents, although, somehow it does feel personal when dsd doesn't act with kindness, as if *WE* did something wrong, yk?

Just looking for al kinds of perspective on this topic.

Thank you for the article, btw! the most interesting part I found, is the one that said we accept that wonderful children can come out from horrific households, but that it's so much more difficult to accept when the opposite happens. (mind you, I am not implying that DSD is horrific, just talking about something that struck a chord from the article).
One_Girl's Avatar One_Girl
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My dd is seven and has started to experiment some with who she wants to be as a person and has on occasion done some things that are very out of character and shocking, like excluding someone from play, teasing someone with friends, and pushing a friend who annoyed her all day long. These are things she sees kids around her doing and I think she is influenced by that. It is disappointing to me because I have raised her to be kind, to express herself with words, and to never touch another person in violence and she has almost always lived up to these values. I think she is experimenting with different choices now because she is starting to figure out who she is as a person. She is very open about what she is doing and tells me about the choices she makes when I am away. I talk to my dd about it and ask her to tell me about her choice and the reasons for it as calmly as possible. I sometimes also tell her more about why I have taught her certain values, why I hope she also embraces those values, ask her questions to help her think about how her choice affected other people (not yes no questions), or tell her about a time I made the same mistake as a child and that it is okay (which helps me remember that it really is okay).

I have heard that around this age kids start to be able to reason more and they want to figure out more things for themselves. I think that what she is doing now is a natural extension of that. It helps to remember that this isn't a constant thing and that she is just a child who is still learning about the world and herself. I think keeping calm and helping her work through both sides of the situation will help her make informed choices about her values and will help her continue to come to me when she needs help making a decision about a situation. It helps that I am totally floored by some of the things she tells me so I have to ask questions to figure out what is going on, freaking out isn't a natural response for me anymore usually.
DariusMom's Avatar DariusMom
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meemee View Post
if that was my dd i would be horrified. disappointed? no. because i am only one of her 'guidance'. she has many more. who she listens to at that moment has nothing to do with me. she could go into the crowd mentality and join them. who knows.

of course my dd has been a pill. even at 7. has she disappointed me. NO!!!! never!!!! its such a harsh strong word. why does she always have to be on her best behaviour? dunno. she is mostly gracious.
Ummm . .. what definition of disappointment are you using? Disappointment is defined as "to fail to meet the expectations, hopes, desires, or standards of; let down" You mean you seriously, sincerely would not feel that your expectations, hopes, desires, and standards for your DD would not be let down if she committed murder?? Why is "disappointment" such a "harsh strong" word for you? You mean you really wouldn't be disappointed if she joined in a crowd mentality and committed murder?


Quote:
Originally Posted by One_Girl View Post
My dd is seven and has started to experiment some with who she wants to be as a person and has on occasion done some things that are very out of character and shocking, like excluding someone from play, teasing someone with friends, and pushing a friend who annoyed her all day long. These are things she sees kids around her doing and I think she is influenced by that. It is disappointing to me because I have raised her to be kind, to express herself with words, and to never touch another person in violence and she has almost always lived up to these values. I think she is experimenting with different choices now because she is starting to figure out who she is as a person. She is very open about what she is doing and tells me about the choices she makes when I am away. I talk to my dd about it and ask her to tell me about her choice and the reasons for it as calmly as possible. I sometimes also tell her more about why I have taught her certain values, why I hope she also embraces those values, ask her questions to help her think about how her choice affected other people (not yes no questions), or tell her about a time I made the same mistake as a child and that it is okay (which helps me remember that it really is okay).

I have heard that around this age kids start to be able to reason more and they want to figure out more things for themselves. I think that what she is doing now is a natural extension of that. It helps to remember that this isn't a constant thing and that she is just a child who is still learning about the world and herself. I think keeping calm and helping her work through both sides of the situation will help her make informed choices about her values and will help her continue to come to me when she needs help making a decision about a situation. It helps that I am totally floored by some of the things she tells me so I have to ask questions to figure out what is going on, freaking out isn't a natural response for me anymore usually.
Thanks for posting this. My DS is 7 and has started with the same behaviors. (see my posting above) It's been hard to deal with because he's generally been so sweet, kind, and thoughtful (and still is, for the most part). So it's hard when he's *disappointed* me with his behavior.
Oriole's Avatar Oriole (TS)
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Thank you very much for your honest replies.
mistymama's Avatar mistymama
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I think I may look at this whole issue very differently than most people - partly because I have a child with Aspergers who can do some pretty socially clueless things, and partly because I was that teen that majorly f'ed up and disappointed her parents.

My child has never disappointed me, he's 7, going on 8. He has done some pretty rude things before, even said some rude stuff to me - but it's my job to help him understand why it was a hurtful thing to say/do .. and I don't take it personally or let it upset me at all. Maybe it's because of the Aspergers, and the fact that he needs help learning social skills.

I also know that as a teen I majorly acted out, smoked pot, got kicked out of school, didn't go to college as planned and I can guarantee my parents were beyond disappointed. But it was a path I needed to take for myself - it made me who I am today, and it didn't take me very long to get myself back on track, learn the life lessons I needed to - and turn out to be a pretty good person.

We are all human, we all make mistakes and heck, I'm disappointed in my *own* behavior more often than my child's - he's still learning and needs my guidance! What about when *I* find myself being a gossip, etc?

Sure - there are some major things like Murder that I just can't tell you how on earth I would react, and hope to God I never have to learn. But most things I can think of would not disappoint me - cry for help, need for attention, need for more guidance ... but not anything I would take personally.

Looks like I'm one of the few that feel this way.
Oriole's Avatar Oriole (TS)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mistymama View Post
I think I may look at this whole issue very differently than most people - partly because I have a child with Aspergers who can do some pretty socially clueless things, and partly because I was that teen that majorly f'ed up and disappointed her parents.

My child has never disappointed me, he's 7, going on 8. He has done some pretty rude things before, even said some rude stuff to me - but it's my job to help him understand why it was a hurtful thing to say/do .. and I don't take it personally or let it upset me at all. Maybe it's because of the Aspergers, and the fact that he needs help learning social skills.
I know what Asperger's is like, and I DO think that it matters. It's not something a child has a control over, so it's a lot more understandable when their actions are not "right".

Quote:
I also know that as a teen I majorly acted out, smoked pot, got kicked out of school, didn't go to college as planned and I can guarantee my parents were beyond disappointed. But it was a path I needed to take for myself - it made me who I am today, and it didn't take me very long to get myself back on track, learn the life lessons I needed to - and turn out to be a pretty good person.
I am more patient and understanding with things that are self-choices, i.e. drugs, sex and rock and roll.
However, when it comes to intentional and remorseless hurting of other people's feelings - that's where the disappointment comes in.

Quote:
Looks like I'm one of the few that feel this way.
I really don't think so.
EdnaMarie's Avatar EdnaMarie
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I'm subbing as I find this interesting. My child is much younger and I'm not sure if I've felt disappointed in her, per se. I have definitely felt ashamed at her behavior, and disappointed about a thing she's done, but disappointed in her, like I expected better of her?

I do think she'll need to get older for me to experience that as now I have so much hope that things can still turn around for the better, LOL!
Storm Bride's Avatar Storm Bride
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My kids have never disappointed me. Maybe it's just a matter of semantics? I'm not sure. DS1 has done a few things I didn't like over the years -not many, but a few - but I've never been disappointed, as such. We talked over the things he did wrong, and applied consequences, as necessary. But, I see childhood/adolescense (well, all of life, but those times, in particular) as a time of learning. When my child does something that I really don't like, I just see it as a lesson that hasn't "taken" yet, not as something to be disappointed by.

The worst ever was probably when ds1 hit a girl in our complex when he was 12...totally out of character for him, and quite a shock. He talked to me about it, went up and down about how to handle it, felt like crap, etc. He eventually went and talked to her and apologized for what happened. He's never hit anyone since. I wasn't happy that he hit someone - not happy at all. But, it never occurred to me to be "disappointed". He's only human and he was only 12 (I remember all too well what those hormone storms can be like!), and he simply found himself dealing with a situation that he lacked the coping skills for.

We have constant and recurring problems with ds2 and hitting. I'm frustrated, exhausted, and bewildered...but not disappointed. I just don't know what's going on in his head, or how to get a handle on it. Honestly, if anyone should be disappointed, it's probably ds2 - I'm the adult, and I don't know how to cope with it.

I'm rambling (I do that). I just see my kids as both separate individuals and "works in progress". I'm not disappointed by their slip-ups and mistakes. We all make them, and I don't expect them to be an exception to that. DS1 is almost grown. There are areas where he deviates from my hypothetical "ideal" (he's a real mooch, for one thing!), but he's...ds1. He's not me. He doesn't have to have the exact same standards of conduct, yk?
Dr.Worm's Avatar Dr.Worm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MusicianDad View Post
My children haven't disappointed me, and I doubt they could. I may dislike their actions at times, but they as people are not a disappointment. I am very careful about distinguishing the person from the action, especially in regards to people I know when they do something otherwise out of character.

Meemee, perhaps your friend needs help looking into life-course persistent offenders vs. adolescent limited offenders... Because chances are his son is the latter.
I think this is the key..I might not like everything dd does or says in her life but I will be there for her no matter what. I love her and I think it's more likely they will either embrace your values or return to them if they know they can come to you when they have done something you consider "wrong." That is so huge. Unconditional Love is so important. I would be devastated if my dd was in some kind of trouble and didn't feel like she could come to me because she feared I would reject her. I always tell her she can tell me anything...she is ten...hope she remembers that as a teen.
MusicianDad's Avatar MusicianDad
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oriole View Post
Would you not be disappointed if they hurt another person on purpose?

I do not mean to imply that your children have it in them, but I am curious what other people do.

We have a very big trial going on in the area, four teenagers broke into a house, killed the mother and almost killed a child (she survived). Certainly the parents of these teens did not see this coming? Who can predict something like this?

I see one child bully another, and some parents will ignore it with excuses, and some will have a discussion about treating others with kindness, but in the moment - it can't feel good to know that's YOUR child is bullying another.

Are you certain that your children will never say a cruel remark to another person? Will never make fun of anyone? I hope you are right, but I guess I am asking for a perspective of those who can imagine that possibility, and would like to know beyond discussing things with your kid, how would you move on internally?

Kindness is very important quality for me in a person. I get the trial and error of growing up, and DSD acts with great kindness sometimes, but I have also seen a mean streak. I guess I hope that the kind side wins before she is all grown up, but I worry - what if it won't? kwim?
Separating the action from the child. My child saying a cruel remark doesn't make my child a cruel person. It makes my child a person who said a cruel remark. Which is how I would deal with it. It is how I have dealt with it. DD is not perfect. She has engaged in behaviour that has not been very nice in the past. But she was not the one I was disappointed with. It was her actions. We talked about. we discussed what kind of person she, what kind of person she wants to continue to be, and how the actions she engaged in contradicted that, and mostly distinguishing between her and her actions and how she has control over the actions she commits and has control over the type of person she is.

DD is almost 12 now and I do have a hard time seeing her doing anything like that anymore because she is a truly loving person who cares about the feelings and physical integrity of everyone, even people she admittedly doesn't like.
mistymama's Avatar mistymama
05:56 PM Liked: 14
#25 of 34
07-15-2010 | Posts: 4,824
Joined: Oct 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr.Worm View Post
I think this is the key..I might not like everything dd does or says in her life but I will be there for her no matter what. I love her and I think it's more likely they will either embrace your values or return to them if they know they can come to you when they have done something you consider "wrong." That is so huge. Unconditional Love is so important. I would be devastated if my dd was in some kind of trouble and didn't feel like she could come to me because she feared I would reject her. I always tell her she can tell me anything...she is ten...hope she remembers that as a teen.
This is so very true - and something I hope to have with my ds as well. I was terrified to coming to my parents with the truth sometimes, because I knew how much trouble I would get in, or how upset my Mom would be with me. So often I lied and hid things from them, things other kids were able to talk to their parents about. I so hope that ds feels loved unconditionally and feels he can come to us about anything, without rejection. It's something that is very, very important to me.
Dr.Worm's Avatar Dr.Worm
06:04 PM Liked: 40
#26 of 34
07-15-2010 | Posts: 2,241
Joined: Nov 2001
Quote:
Originally Posted by MusicianDad View Post
Separating the action from the child. My child saying a cruel remark doesn't make my child a cruel person. It makes my child a person who said a cruel remark. Which is how I would deal with it. It is how I have dealt with it. DD is not perfect. She has engaged in behaviour that has not been very nice in the past. But she was not the one I was disappointed with. It was her actions. We talked about. we discussed what kind of person she, what kind of person she wants to continue to be, and how the actions she engaged in contradicted that, and mostly distinguishing between her and her actions and how she has control over the actions she commits and has control over the type of person she is.

DD is almost 12 now and I do have a hard time seeing her doing anything like that anymore because she is a truly loving person who cares about the feelings and physical integrity of everyone, even people she admittedly doesn't like.
Just have to say I agree with this post also Musician Dad. I really think this is what makes a child feel secure in your love...totally what AP is all about.
Dr.Worm's Avatar Dr.Worm
06:07 PM Liked: 40
#27 of 34
07-15-2010 | Posts: 2,241
Joined: Nov 2001
Quote:
Originally Posted by mistymama View Post
This is so very true - and something I hope to have with my ds as well. I was terrified to coming to my parents with the truth sometimes, because I knew how much trouble I would get in, or how upset my Mom would be with me. So often I lied and hid things from them, things other kids were able to talk to their parents about. I so hope that ds feels loved unconditionally and feels he can come to us about anything, without rejection. It's something that is very, very important to me.
Yeah, I keep thinking..for example...say she's at a party and there's underage drinking...she doesnt want to drink and doesn't feel comfortable being there. She wants a ride home but her best friend is drunk...I want her to be able to call me and tell me what's happening, not risk her life with a drunk driver because she's terrified that I would be mad that she was at that kind of a party. I just hope I can really be that cool of a mom if it ever happens
ssh's Avatar ssh
06:11 PM Liked: 58
#28 of 34
07-15-2010 | Posts: 1,681
Joined: Aug 2007
If we're honest, anyone we have a relationship with will disappoint us to some degree at some point in time and we will disappoint them. If you love someone unconditionally, incidents of disappointing behavior don't effect your love, respect and support of that person, kids included. With your children though it's important to not take the differences in their lifestyle or decisions personally. They are separate people and have a right to their own mistakes, beliefs, and world views.

I'm proud and supportive of my older DD, age 24, regardless of what she's doing, even if her choice is something I wouldn't do in a million years because I know she's trying to be the best person can be and I value her as a person unconditionally. Anything annoying my 4.5 year old DD does, she probably does because she's still an impulsive preschooler. She's not old enough provoke disappointment yet.
ssh's Avatar ssh
06:28 PM Liked: 58
#29 of 34
07-15-2010 | Posts: 1,681
Joined: Aug 2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by MusicianDad View Post
we discussed what kind of person she, what kind of person she wants to continue to be, and how the actions she engaged in contradicted that, and mostly distinguishing between her and her actions and how she has control over the actions she commits and has control over the type of person she is.
I think talking with your kids about how they choose to be the person they want to be is very important. Last fall I started talking to my 4.5 year old about what kind of person she wants to be and how her behavior choices influence how people see her as a person. And how the choice of what kind of person she is can help her choose her behavior. My DD was experimenting with some rude and bossy behavior, which is very developmentally normal. I just wanted her to realize that behavior can be a way of expressing who you are. When I notice her doing things in a rude or unkind manner I let her know why I think the behavior is rude and we talk about how the behavior doesn't fit in with the kind of person she wants to be.
Oriole's Avatar Oriole (TS)
06:36 PM Liked: 37
#30 of 34
07-15-2010 | Posts: 4,199
Joined: May 2007
I get the slip ups, and being human, and saying doing things we regret later. The only thing that I do not get is lack of remorse in cases when there should be.

I agree though with always being there for the child, and loving no matter what. I know that regardless of the choices dsd I will always be there for her, and will always love. To me being disappointed doesn't mean not loving.

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