Limited Television - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
Old 12-12-2010, 08:37 AM - Thread Starter
 
VisionaryMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 3,736
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

We have been experimenting with eliminating TV on certain days in our house. We've found, not unsurprisingly, a huge difference in the way that DS acts on days when he's been allowed even minimal amounts of TV. We have Netflix, so he watches commercial-free kids' shows, usually 25-45 minutes in duration. He is 5. DD, who's 3, does not get as mesmerized by the television, and I don't see a real difference from her.

 

I'd like to limit but not completely eliminate TV. I grew up with no TV most of the time. DH grew up with it in, I suppose, moderate doses, though I consider it pretty TV-heavy. DH still LOVES to watch television & movies, and I'd like them on occasion, which is why we don't want to eliminate altogether.

 

So...if you do limited TV, how do you handle it? I'm thinking of saying that they can watch 2 short shows on Friday evenings and maybe a family movie on Saturday or Sunday as permitted. I'm definitely seeing that TV during the week is a BAD idea for us.

 

Also, do you indicate in any way if it's a no-TV day? DS knows his days of the week, but I still thought of covering the TV with a nice cloth or something as a visual reminder.


It's us: DH , DS ; DD ; and me . Also there's the . And the 3 . I . Oh, and .
VisionaryMom is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 12-12-2010, 09:30 AM
 
Llyra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: right here
Posts: 9,388
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My kids get TV tickets, on Sunday after church. They can use those tickets whenever they like during the week, and when the tickets are gone, that's it with the TV for the week. DD1, who's in school, is not allowed to watch TV on weekdays, though-- she has to use her ticket either Friday afternoon/evening, or on the weekends. She doesn't get home until 4 most days, and she needs the time to play actively, or do quiet things, after such a long day.

I have three kids-- they're 6, 3 1/2, and 3 1/2.

I like the idea of covering it with a cloth-- that's a nice visual reminder, so they don't have to ask a thousand times whether it's a TV day.



me knit.gif, he bikenew.gif, my three reading.gif, sleepytime.gif, and fairy.gif-- and the one we lost angel2.gif
Llyra is offline  
Old 12-12-2010, 09:33 AM
 
pianojazzgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Montreal
Posts: 4,308
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

My ds sounds a lot like your ds.  A few months ago I realized things had gotten out of hand with the tv - the kids were watching more than I felt comfortable with, and ds (in particular) was having horrible melt-downs over tv.  Dh and I weren't seeing eye-to-eye about how much tv the kids should watch either.  So a few months ago dh went out of town for 2 wks and I decided to go cold-turkey no-screen-time.  The first few days were rough, but after that life just got waaay easier.  The kids discovered this new well of creativity.  They didn't even ask about the tv (which I covered with a cloth and wheeled into a different room. 

 

My plan was not to go permanently tv-free, but to start off that way (to kind of de-tox) and then to introduce limited screen time.  So that's where we are now.  We actually don't have any kind of system (certain days are tv day, or tv "tokens" to spend or anything like that).  We just occasionally turn on the tv.  So far we've done a handful of Friday night movie nights, and the kids watched a couple of periods of a hockey game with dh.  They've also watched a few kids shows at friends' houses.  So far that system (or lack of system!) is working well for us.  Tv has ceased to be something they expect and it's turned into a special treat.   I suspect that the couple of months of absolutely no tv probably helped get rid of the expectation of tv.


Kate, mom to 7 year old Djuna and 4 yr old Alden. Missing our good friend Hal the cat who died June 2, 2010

pianojazzgirl is offline  
Old 12-12-2010, 05:26 PM
 
Lisa1970's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 2,526
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)

I definitely would not cover the TV if you are not having troubles. You want your son to be able to look at a TV and not feel like he should be watching. So he can make good choices in the future.

 

I think you are doing great how you are doing now! I would not change a thing!

Lisa1970 is offline  
Old 12-12-2010, 08:16 PM
 
Daffodil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Vermont
Posts: 3,578
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)

We don't have TV, but the kids watch videos sometimes.  I have to go out to evening meetings about 8 nights a month, and our general rule is that the kids watch videos only on those nights.  (We also let them watch videos when one kid is sick, and we very occasionally have a family video night when I'm home.)  That works well for us.

Daffodil is offline  
Old 12-12-2010, 08:26 PM
 
bluebackpacks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Northern New England
Posts: 119
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by VisionaryMom View Post

 I'm thinking of saying that they can watch 2 short shows on Friday evenings and maybe a family movie on Saturday or Sunday as permitted.


 

This sounds like a good plan.  As a side note, I love those uninterrupted afternoons of free-range play... the tinkering over new inventions and the off-the-cuff science experiments involving lots of water and random objects (you know... will this float?).

bluebackpacks is offline  
Old 12-12-2010, 08:53 PM
 
JudiAU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Where creepy facebook-featured threads can't find me
Posts: 3,609
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)

I watched a lot as a kid, was tv-free for ten years, and then watched a lot with DH. Dh watched little. DH loves tv and made a radical shift when he became a SAHD and was tv free around the kids. (willingly)  The kids (3.5, 16m) don't watch any time except for an hour of christmas stuff once a year that DH loves. When we do watch tv it won't be during the week at all and maybe something as a family on the weekend or an hour on Saturday.

 

Even more than "tv" I hate branding/characters/commercials/and crummy toys so if we don't overwhelmed in the side junk or related annoying behavior I'll be okay with more of it. Dh loves the way our son plays right now and he agrees that tv would just mess it up.

 

I never want it there as something we rely on or the kids expect.

JudiAU is online now  
Old 12-13-2010, 06:48 AM
 
ollyoxenfree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,895
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)

 

Rather than covering the t.v., can you move it somewhere a little inconvenient or out of the way? I've noticed that when the t.v. is front and centre in high traffic living space, everyone watches it more often, including me. When it's in a room that isn't used often, we tend to forget about it. In our last house, the t.v. was in a great room - one huge kitchen/dining room/family room combination that opened into the backyard. It seemed like the t.v. was on constantly. Now our t.v. is in the family room which is in a renovated basement.  Viewing isn't quite a special occasion event, but it happens much less often and tends to occur at night only after all the other daily action is over. 

 

 

ollyoxenfree is offline  
Old 12-13-2010, 11:20 AM
 
altoidmandy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 53
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I just wanted to share a recent experience we had at our house.  We recently were given a flat screen TV that mounts on the wall.  It is mounted significantly higher than our old TV, which sat on a low console at just about toddler eye level (my son is two).  In the few days that we have had it, I have noticed a significant decrease in his requests for TV.  I am not advocating buying an expensive TV just to get your kids to watch less, but for us "out of sight out of mind" has worked.

altoidmandy is offline  
Old 12-13-2010, 05:44 PM
 
mommariffic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: the rolling hills, New Jersey
Posts: 1,786
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

We limit here : )

 

DD and I both enjoy Animal Planet (especially Dog 101) so each day she's allowed 1 hour of TV spread out throughout the day. During the summer/spring we rarely watch because we are outside in the garden, or at the park or in the woods. Winter months we tend to watch more because we are inside (DD hates going out in the cold..) I don't really worry about it as long as she's not begging, and we are balancing the day with learning, reading, and lots and lots of creative play!


blogging.jpg    fambedsingle2.gif  homebirth.jpg  read.gif  happy momma to DD 8/07 and DS 6/10
mommariffic is offline  
Old 12-14-2010, 08:41 AM
 
oaktreemama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 382
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

We limit as well. The only thing my son watches is football. We are football fanatics. And honestly he know we love the Brown's and Buckeye's, but doesn't really pay much attention. We also play outside on Sundays and often listen to the game on the radio. So, I feel pretty good about our TV habits-no cartoons, no Nick Jr, no Disney. I just hate that a lot of programs geared towards my son are brand name tie ins that encourage him to want stuff.

 

Oh-he does watch YouTube stuff about butterflies-his passion.

oaktreemama is offline  
Old 12-14-2010, 09:51 AM
 
peainthepod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Chasing sanity
Posts: 2,242
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
You might check out the TV-Free subforum here. A lot of the mamas aren't completely TV-free, but they strictly limit it. We don't have a TV but do let our toddler watch DVDs of his favorite shows from time to time (David Attenborough nature specials, Wallace and Gromit, The Snowman). The only thing I've found that works when his screen time is getting out of control is to go cold turkey. It's rough at first but works well to redirect his energy and attention.

Loving wife partners.gif and mama to my sweet little son coolshine.gif (Fall 2008) and a beautiful baby girl babyf.gif(Fall 2010)

 

When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty. --George Bernard Shaw

peainthepod is offline  
Old 12-19-2010, 03:10 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 13
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Good call with covering it with a cloth.  Definitely have to monitor the time they spend watching TV, otherwise it could lead to ADD and many other problems coming up with this new world we live in.

Stacey12 is offline  
Old 01-04-2011, 10:47 AM
 
Flarmonster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Newark, NJ
Posts: 9
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

 

we limit videos to weekends. We tell DD that she can watch videos on "mommy, daddy,dahlia days" smile.gif that seems to put it in language she can understand right now. Going cold turkey when she gets in a watching rut definitely works well. The holidays are rough, because there are more days when we are all home, but we tend to be more busy, so videos don't come up as much. BTW, we don't have a TV, never have-just watch things on the computer. So we don't cover it or anything, but I can see how that would be a good visual reminder for a little one!

Mom to DD #1, DS #2 and DD #3; Part time dog trainer, full time baby trainer

Flarmonster is offline  
Old 01-04-2011, 11:42 AM
 
emmsmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 157
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

When my kids were younger (under 3 or so) I found it very easy to limit tv for them.  I rarely turned the tv on unless they were in bed and they didn't bug for it during the day because they were used to it not being on.  Now that they are older (8 &11), we've had some battles, but I worked out a system a couple years ago that seems to work well.  They are allowed tv or computer/video game time from 7-9pm each night, unless we are out or have something else going on.  Some nights they can't wait for 7pm to be able to watch a show or play a computer game, other days they play right through their "tv time" and don't watch anything or go on the computer.

 

This works well because they no longer whine for tv throughout the day and they don't have the typical "mental slump" that kids often get when they watch tv during the day.  I found when they used to watch tv during the day it was like their imaginations were turned off afterwards, except on very rare occasions when whatever they watched sparked a new play idea.  Most of the time though they would be whining they were bored all afternoon if I let them watch tv in the morning.

 

There are some times when I will let them watch a Magic School Bus, Cyberchase, or other educational program during the day, but it's rare and they know not to bug me for tv because 7-9 is their time to watch tv if they want to.

 

ETA:  They have to have their daily chores done, rooms clean, pjs on, and teeth brushed before they are allowed their tv time at night so this also helps them to get their responsibilities taken care of because they know if they dawdle or whine it will just cut into their tv time.  It also works out nicely at 9pm because they are already ready for bed so we cuddle in my bed and read a couple chapters of a book together and then I tuck them into their beds for the night and have some time for myself with no bedtime battles.

emmsmama is offline  
Old 01-04-2011, 01:13 PM
 
goldenwillow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: In the trees
Posts: 1,124
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)

We have been TV/cable free for a good number of years here prior to DS.  I find that it just pollutes my head.  It is funny to me when family asks questions RE:  news, weather, etc. in our area and I have no idea what they are talking about..  news hype. 

 

DH just bought himself a flat TV to watch movies on and I was pretty sick about it but wanted to be able to watch a few movies or concerts on DVD here and there... double edged sword. 

 

DS does get mesmerized for sure when we watch something after a bit.  We are sure to just watch for his cues. 

 

We cover ours as well...  if not DS points to it which makes me just sick to my tummy. 


'09   
goldenwillow is offline  
Old 01-04-2011, 01:52 PM
 
AnaB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 49
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

My daughter is two years old and we have been TV free for about two months. I love it and would never go back! I was so thrilled with the results I wrote a whole article about it. To begin with, before she was born, I was very much against babies watching TV. When she was about 8 months we let her watch a couple of Russian cartoons from our own childhood, then it snowballed from there. Curious George, Thomas, Caillou, it seemed like there was no end to it. When she was 18 months she would ask for TV first thing in the morning and it just killed me.

 

So I decided to go cold turkey, covered the TV with a cloth (can't move it, it's a 42" plasma), and told her it is broken for now. She was absolutely fine and after 2 days of whining she forgot about it. She slept better, ate better, behaved better, started playing independently, etc... Now we usually have one night a week when we all sit down together as a family and watch a movie together. We all enjoy it and she looks forward to it. Occasionally she might watch something at relatives house, but never at home. It has made life so much easier, I enjoy being home with her a lot more now. We're cancelling cable as soon as our contract is up. :)

AnaB is offline  
Old 01-04-2011, 05:51 PM
 
aurora_skys's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 489
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by AnaB View Post

My daughter is two years old and we have been TV free for about two months. I love it and would never go back! I was so thrilled with the results I wrote a whole article about it. To begin with, before she was born, I was very much against babies watching TV. When she was about 8 months we let her watch a couple of Russian cartoons from our own childhood, then it snowballed from there. Curious George, Thomas, Caillou, it seemed like there was no end to it. When she was 18 months she would ask for TV first thing in the morning and it just killed me.

 

So I decided to go cold turkey, covered the TV with a cloth (can't move it, it's a 42" plasma), and told her it is broken for now. She was absolutely fine and after 2 days of whining she forgot about it. She slept better, ate better, behaved better, started playing independently, etc... Now we usually have one night a week when we all sit down together as a family and watch a movie together. We all enjoy it and she looks forward to it. Occasionally she might watch something at relatives house, but never at home. It has made life so much easier, I enjoy being home with her a lot more now. We're cancelling cable as soon as our contract is up. :)


Thank you for this, this is exactly what happened to my son of the same age. I was soo against tv and before I knew it it became a parenting crutch. He even would scream for Caillou in the mornings. I think just covering the damned thing up and saying its broken is a great solution (for starters I mean. I would like to watch nature shows with him as he gets older, maybe next year)

aurora_skys is offline  
Old 01-06-2011, 11:43 PM
 
zebaby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Chicago
Posts: 507
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

We give our 4 yo DS "TV tokens" - 6 per day, each is worth 15 min of TV time. He can choose to use them or not. Once they're gone, no more TV for the day. Tokens are not carried over to the next day. Any unused tokens can be cashed in for 50 cents. He saves his money to buy a toy, book, or CD (he may not use them to buy DVD's, computer games or sweets) to promote more organic playtime vs. TV time. He has saved $72! It teaches him worth, saving money, and gives him the freedom to watch TV if he really wants it. Computer time is also counted as "TV time". Generally, he'll use all his tokens only about 2-3 days per week. The rest of the days he usually only uses 0-3 tokens per day. Allowing him to watch some TV seems to take the power struggle out of the picture. Works for us. 

 

(BTW, We totally control what he watches. Always commercial free. Very age appropriate shows/games. Often times heavily educational.)


kathyhola.gif : , proud mama to seansuperhero.gif (12/06) and wife to zane reading.gif : cat.gif

zebaby is offline  
Old 01-07-2011, 11:08 AM
 
emmsmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 157
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I like the idea of tokens being traded for a small amount of money.  The system I have going right now works well, but I'll have to ponder that option.

emmsmama is offline  
Old 01-07-2011, 01:51 PM
 
Smithie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 4,422
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)

 

I hate the idea of TV tokens, for the same reasons I hate the idea of scheduled snacks:

 

1. If it's fundamentally unhealthy healthy to consume without strict controls, I don't like to make it available as a regular daily thing.

 

2. If it's something my kids will need to self-regulate in adulthood with possible serious consequences if they don't, then I like to start that training as early as possible.

 

So we have apples and bananas in a basket for snacks whenever, and DVDs and and supervised Netflix and YouTube and computer games for screen time whenever.

 

If I felt strongly that screen time was bad for my kids, I would probably have no TVs at all in the house. But I happen to think it's a GOOD in moderation, and so cultivating a healthy appetite for visual media in one of the life skills we are teaching in this house. There are times when I cut them off and redirect to another activity, but it happens less often than you'd think, PARTICULARLY SINCE WE GOT RID OF CABLE TV. Nick Jr. is adorable and I like the messages in most of the shows, but it's designed to keep your kid watching. Ditto PBS Kids. One show flows seamlessly into another. I don't think they are ready for that aspect of media yet - most of the adults I know can't handle it! 

 

Smithie is offline  
Old 01-07-2011, 02:05 PM - Thread Starter
 
VisionaryMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 3,736
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Well, we ended up just explaining that I felt everyone was being grouchy from watching TV in the afternoons. They've stopped watching television (Netflix) or even asking to watch in the afternoons. DS sometimes gets to watch for half an hour or so while one of us is putting DD to bed if the other is busy. We've not instituted "family movie night," but DH did go through and put several kids' movies in our Netflix queue so that we have something ready if the kids ask to watch a movie on a Friday or Saturday.

 

Re: tokens - I wouldn't keep up with that kind of system. Plus it sets up a kind of forced routine that I don't like. I watched a friend turn off a movie her son was watching in the middle of it because his tokens were up. That just seemed mean to me! Plus this kid doesn't watch TV everyday, so why can't he build up the tokens (which would be my son's first question)? It just complicates things for me and my personality.


It's us: DH , DS ; DD ; and me . Also there's the . And the 3 . I . Oh, and .
VisionaryMom is offline  
Old 01-07-2011, 05:43 PM
 
sapphire_chan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 27,052
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Off-topic, As an experiment, track what you do on non-TV days and do some of those things on TV days and see what happens.

sapphire_chan is offline  
Old 01-10-2011, 10:51 AM
 
KittyM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Monrovia, CA
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

We didn't have a pre-defined time limit when our kids were little, and some days they watched none, and some days they watched some.  On sick days or rainy weekends, maybe too much!  I agree with the pp who is encouraging self-regulation, this is a really important thing to consciously develop in our kids.

 

The other thing we did was to make a hard and fast rule that if we were watching regular TV, we would mute the commercials (or ff through them when we got tivo).  The benefits were many:  less whining for junk toys and food, a natural break where they might get involved in something else, and no brainwashing that we have to sit there and watch that stuff.  When they got older, dh and I would sometimes watch the commercials with the sound off with them, and talk about advertising and the ways commercials try to manipulate your thoughts.  Now our kids (16 and 13) don't care about brands, can't stand to watch commercials, and are pretty discerning consumers of visual media.

KittyM is offline  
Old 01-10-2011, 06:58 PM
 
zebaby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Chicago
Posts: 507
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

The amount can vary depending on what's comfortable for each family. Originally, I suspected that he'd only save a couple of tokens a day at most, giving him only about 5 or so dollars per week, if that. I figured it would be fun for him to purchase something with "his own money" even though I may have gotten it for him anyway. What I do like about him having his own money is that if there's something I don't care to buy for him myself, I can turn it into a lesson in spending (is this something you'll end up using a lot? will it last more than a few times of playing? do you already have something like this at home? do you want this item more than a more expensive one that you'll need to save money for?).

 

To my surprise, there have been weeks that he'll skip TV for days on end, then end up saving a ton of money. At first, I was almost drawn to take him out to go spend all the money. Then I realized that was not exactly the message I wanted to send. I later limited it to one or two small toys per week, but only if he asked for them. Lately, he's simply saved his money and not gone to purchase anything at all (which is fine with me). For a while he was "saving" to buy a digital piano, so I think he just figured he'd have to save 'til the end of time!

 

I think if I did it again, I may start with a quarter per token or even a dime (they seem so small - I'd hate to keep track of multiple dimes - but at the same time, they would help teach him to count by 10's). Either way, I think it can be turned into a great learning opportunity all around.

 

BTW, we don't "award" tokens for doing chores, etc. He just gets a set amount. If there is a negative behavior that is becoming a problem and we'd like to correct it, we will consider taking away a token as a consequence for repeating that behavior.


kathyhola.gif : , proud mama to seansuperhero.gif (12/06) and wife to zane reading.gif : cat.gif

zebaby is offline  
Old 01-18-2011, 04:28 PM
 
indignantgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 291
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

A friend of mine put little sticky velcro circles on the front of the TV and started sticking a cloth over the front. 

She doesn't actively moderate TV watching, but she noticed that the kids just magically stopped asking to watch TV when it was covered.  Like, a significant decrease of 90% by her estimation!  Even her husband doesn't watch TV as much and they spend more evenings reading together.

It helps that the cloth is very unobtrusive and blends with the TV, so it doesn't draw attention (of the kids, I mean).  I'd imagine a bright red cloth might remind the kids what they were missing. :D


Shayla ~ Crunch-tastic UC mama of 3 nature kids and a moon baby
 
 

indignantgirl is offline  
Old 01-19-2011, 11:58 AM
 
Jugs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 470
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

We started limiting TV to see if it would help with my son's behavioral issues; the kids only ever watched PBS Kids, but (being ASD) I wondered if maybe it was a sensory issue for him. We have a "choice board" set up in the kitchen with one side of the board having a picture of each of their favorite PBS shows, and the other side of the board are two columns: one for TV shows and one for the start times. Each morning the kids decide together on 4 shows, then move the pictures to the other side of the board and I help them fill in the start time. They also have opportunities to earn an extra show, as well as have shows taken away.    



 

 

Jugs is offline  
Old 01-25-2011, 08:57 PM
 
mombear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: with the snow and/or bugs, MN
Posts: 27
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

This is a really interesting thread.  We have 2 dd, age 9 and 5.  We keep our tv in a specific room (actually a main floor bedroom set up for tv, movies, books), so we do have a lot of the out-of-sight/out-of mind going on.  The girls probably watch about an hour (2 shows) about every other day, then family movie time once a week on the weekend.

 

My biggest thing with the TV watching is the commercials/tie-ins/etc.  HATE 'em, refuse to be a part of it.  We don't have cable, but we do have a TV-recording device.  This has been the absolute best thing ever - we can record only the shows we care about letting the girls watch (all pbs: some nova, science/history programming, etc, with mostly kids' programming), the recorder takes out all the "commercials" (anything that's not part of the main program), and not only that, but it goes back to a main menu when the show is finished, creating a big demarcation line between shows that the girls completely understand.

 

We almost literally can't watch "regular" TV anymore, commercials and just watching whatever happens to be on is so annoying.  Again, not a low-cost option (maybe a geek mom or dad out there can find the linux-based system my husband set up?), but it's been such a great thing for our family.  I think without it, we'd be TV-free.  (DH and I do love our netflix, though!)


married to DH love.gif since 98, DD reading.gif 2002 (bradley natural hospital birth), DD dust.gif2006 (water home birth),  pippin the doodle dog2.gif 2009; eclectic homeschooling, crunchy Christian, knit.gif  sewmachine.gifcrochetsmilie.gif, runner, fixing up our 90 yr old house & garden..
mombear is offline  
Old 01-26-2011, 06:58 AM
 
velochic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Dreaming of the Bavarian Alps
Posts: 8,198
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by mombear View Post
We almost literally can't watch "regular" TV anymore, commercials and just watching whatever happens to be on is so annoying.  Again, not a low-cost option (maybe a geek mom or dad out there can find the linux-based system my husband set up?), but it's been such a great thing for our family.  I think without it, we'd be TV-free.  (DH and I do love our netflix, though!)


Can you give some more information about this linux-based system?  Thanks!

velochic is offline  
Old 01-26-2011, 01:26 PM
 
whitei's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 3
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I have a 4 year old and a 2 1/2 year old and I do a pretty good job of limiting their screen time but sometimes I feel like I am running out of activities to do with them...any suggestions

 

Also, I am new to these forums so I would like to know what are some of these abbreviations; DH, DS and so onwink1.gif

whitei is offline  
 
User Tag List

Thread Tools


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off