Do you public school? - Page 2 - Mothering Forums
Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#31 of 47 Old 05-07-2011, 08:26 AM
 
Tigerchild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Seattle Eastside
Posts: 5,005
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by tex.mom View Post.  And what do you do to keep your kids thinking outside-the-box and challenging the status quo?


Well, allowing them to be in an environment where they're going to make friends with a diverse set of backgrounds, religious beliefs, heritage, and family structure is a good start.  For us, that's the public school system.  Sure, I could put them in one of the crunchy-ish private programs but to be blunt, those people are more alike (even as they are patting themselves on the back for being so "different") as a group than anything you'd find in our local public schools.  My kids get to be buddies with kids with kids in the special needs program, they are friends with kids with physical disabilities, they are in class with a variety of learning styles (and have teachers that enjoy teaching to different learning styles).  They are friends with english language learning kids.  They have friends who are Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Muslim, Atheist, Buddhist, Sikh, UU, pagan.

 

While if I homeschooled I would make the effort to expose them to all that, and would do an okay job of it, they would NOT get that at any of the private schools we could afford (ironically, there are a couple around here that cost more than my college did every year that suprisingly they WOULD do a pretty good job, but unfortunately that's just not an option).  While I do understand the AP clique when you've got babies and don't want to be challenged or only want to be supported when you're in that intense parenting season, IME that matters less and less as the kids get older, and I get bored surrounded by people with the exact same beliefs as me.  That can give you the new status quo and put you in a box as well.

LynnS6 likes this.
Tigerchild is offline  
#32 of 47 Old 05-07-2011, 06:01 PM
 
BubbleMa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 1,572
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

We're non-vax'ing, breastfeeding, non-circ'ing, cloth diapering, babywearing, homebirthing, public schoolers.

 

She started out in a private Montessori school (3yrs-1st grade).  She's now in a public school and she loves it (so do I!).  :)

 


Sarah, partner to J and mom to DD1 April 30th, 2002 and DD2 May 5th, 2012. love.gif

BubbleMa is offline  
#33 of 47 Old 05-07-2011, 07:45 PM
 
Linda on the move's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: basking in the sunshine
Posts: 10,546
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigerchild View Post
Well, allowing them to be in an environment where they're going to make friends with a diverse set of backgrounds, religious beliefs, heritage, and family structure is a good start.  For us, that's the public school system. 


 

agreed. Both the public school my kids attended and the private school they go to now are FAR more diverse than any homeschool group. (We used to homeschool, too. We've now done everything!)

 

The families at the private alternative school my kids go to are more similar at the primary level because a lot of those families are choosing the school because of the parents beliefs. It's more diverse the older the kids get. There are kids with mild special needs, kids who are 2E, kids who had traumatic experiences and regular school not longer cut it for them. There are also some of the crunchy kids left. No body thinks much about the racial, religious, family structure diversity much because the kids themselves are such a diverse group, but it's there. Single parents, two mommies, jewish kids, kids with single parents, etc.

 

When we homeschooled, it was pretty much all middle class white people who were married. At least that's who was available for homeschool activities.


but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

Linda on the move is online now  
#34 of 47 Old 05-07-2011, 08:14 PM
 
Lisa1970's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 2,604
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I can honestly say that the public schools where I live cannot hold a candle to the schools where I grew up. Even at the high school level, the average SAT scores at the public high school I graduated is about 150 points per test above the state average in the state I am in now, and about 100 points per test in the school we are zoned for now. I can honestly say most of the teachers are not smart, caring, or creative. To the contrary, Texas does not require much for someone to be a teacher, not even any sort of test to pass or certification. I was shocked to find out that half my children's teachers were uncertified through the years. Where I grew up, many teachers had master's degrees. They also had to do continuing ed. AND, they had to have degrees and certifications. Here, someone with a watered down degree that they are working to finish can be hired as a teacher on what is called a probationary certificate. But in reality, they do not even have to get that. Most of the uncertified teachers I have seen do not have that. I got reports from every single one of my children while they were in public school that the teachers barely even bothered with the classes and spent a lot of time playing on the computers and talking on the cells phones. In some cases, teachers would leave the classrooms unattended and wandered off throughout the day or class. Since I actually did a lot of volunteer work and was even on the PTA board, this is actually exactly what I saw when I was up there. 

 

I wish my children could have what I grew up with. My children have had an occasional good teacher, but that ended up being the exception rather than the rule. The elementary school I went to was like a Montessori schools and kids were all at their own pace and levels. Everything was individualized. Then we moved to a grade school that was awful, but by junior high, things got good again. One of the reasons I home school is for academic reasons. But it is also over the extreme bullying and the tolerance of serious sexual harassment in our district with no recourse or protections for the students. Once I started home schooling, the academic reasons really set in. IF we moved to another state, I MIGHT give public school a try again, but honestly, there is just so much more to home schooling than what one sees from the outside looking in. Or even just in their first year or two. I mean, just think of it..a child thinks they are whatever label they get saddled with early on in school. The are the smart one, or the athletic one, or the cute one, or the popular one, and they never can even consider they might not be what the people at school labeled them as. Their entire self image ends up being based on what the school declares them to be very early on. That is just one of many things I have noticed since we got off the public school roller coaster. Granted, my older kids are in charter school this year, but that is awful. The bullying is not present, so socially it is better, but the academics are way lower than the regular zoned public school. I do not think my children should have to give up academics to escape the bullying and sexual harassment at the regular public school. So, we will be back to home schooling next year. 

Lisa1970 is offline  
#35 of 47 Old 05-08-2011, 07:38 PM
 
CatsCradle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: New York City
Posts: 2,006
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I think that we were fairly AP-style parents but I don't think that homeschooling, per se, is a requirement for AP parenting or 'good' parenting for that matter.  Our DD is presently in a private school, but that is in part to the fact that DH and I both WOH, which means that DD is in after-school programs and we value the consistency that her present school provides.  I had a great public school experience, and I think there are a lot of public school experiences out there just waiting to happen, it is just not in the cards right now for  us given our circumstances.  I don't take the philosophical view that somehow homeschooling is better simply because it is homeschooling.  Rather, I take the view that we need to model DD's education based on her needs and the needs of our family as a whole.  As other PPs have mentioned, I think that is really what AP is about.  I really tire of the check-list approach, because it assumes that one general way is best for everyone.  I don't see how that idea is any different from the idea that public system moves sheep along.  There are certain moral and medical issues by which I take a hard stand.  Education, to me, is a subject in which I must remain a lot more flexible.


"Lawyers, I suppose, were children once." Charles Lamb.
CatsCradle is offline  
#36 of 47 Old 05-08-2011, 07:59 PM
 
Cascadian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 892
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Preface this by saying that the below is my thought process, based on who I am and who my kids are. YMMV, obvs.

 

Extended breastfeeding, natural living, gentle discipline, AP, family bed, delayed vax here. I have absolutely zero interest in homeschooling my kids, and could not wait for them to go to school. Does it make me any less AP or counterculture? Heck no. I personally see the counterculture opportunity coming from being able to have a discussion about the issues they deal with in school via other kids, curriculum, etc. rather than the mono-culture they would get at home (and therefore lack of practice in being counterculture, if you KWIM). No hothouse flowers here. I was private school educated, my kids are in public school (albeit a very high socioeconomic catchment with excellent teachers and extras). We chose very, very carefully, and visited the schools we were interested in.

 

School teachers are educated in the art and science of teaching kids. So much goes into that - educational psychology, developmental learning theories, new educational technologies, etc. etc. Just because I gave birth to them doesn't mean I can give them their academic life as well. I had a visceral negative reaction to most that I read about Waldorf (including friends who were Waldorf refugees, as they put it, which sealed the deal for me), didn't want unisex private school education as they don't have brothers, and decided that they have to live IN the world so they'd better learn about it from a first hand basis (with the consciousness to deconstruct it). A friend homeschools where I am - her child has PDD-NOS and the public schools would not meet her kid's needs - and she says that most of the homeschoolers in the group she's in are doing it because of religion or special needs.

 

I will be choosing a unisex private school for high school, purely for the low student/teacher ratio, exceptionally high standards, focus/concentration on school and not boys (while IN class, that is), and the very pro-female environment that I graduated in. 100% of the graduating class went on to university, and about 75% to graduate school. Not just doctors and lawyers, but artists and writers and filmmakers. That fits well with my goals for my kids.

 

Cascadian is offline  
#37 of 47 Old 05-09-2011, 06:28 AM
 
ollyoxenfree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,933
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)

 

I don't quite fit the profile you describe - we vaccinate but don't circumcise, I breastfed and cloth-diapered, one high-risk pregnancy did not have a natural delivery and I make no apologies for that, but the other was natural. So I guess I'm somewhere in between on the spectrum, or maybe all over it. "All over the place" also kind of describes our approach to education as well - we've used private and public schools and also homeschooled, as we needed or wanted at the time. I believe in finding the most appropriate solution for individual circumstances rather than trying to force individuals to comply with a particular philosophy or belief system no matter what. So I also used bottle-feeding and disposable diapers at times when it was convenient, and I didn't hesitate to put myself and my unborn child in the hands of the medical system when a problem was discovered in utero during a pregnancy. And when it has suited them, my dc have enrolled in public schools. It has often suited them. 

 

They are teens now and pretty much make their own decisions about schooling. For years, I have invited them to homeschool many, many times - particularly when they complain about things like workload, a boring class or a poor fit with a teacher. They have not taken me up on that offer. They attend a highly regarded performing arts program and there is no way that homeschooling (or any local private school, for that matter) could duplicate the level of instruction and the talented student peer group that they enjoy working with every day. They know that and they choose to work through any problems they encounter. It has been wonderful to observe the emotional maturity, adaptability and confidence that they have developed as a result. 

 

Even before they attended the performing arts school, we found that they learned well in a group setting and gained greatly from the diversity in the public schools, both from the backgrounds and experiences of other students and the exposure to different styles and methods of different teachers. I know that they would have had a good education if they had homeschooled throughout, but they chose public school from a young age. Since they have experienced both and made an informed decision about their schooling, it's hard to argue with their choice. It's even harder to argue when I see what remarkable young adults they've become. 

 

 

 

 

 

ollyoxenfree is offline  
#38 of 47 Old 05-09-2011, 08:03 AM
 
mountain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: closer to fine
Posts: 1,869
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

This issue is always on my head.  I'm the caretaker/tutor for a family with younger kids, and also have kids of my own that are older.  I do feel that the general philosophy of attachment parenting extends to schooling, though, of course, its not a laundry list of ideals you need to check off.

 

 

 

My kids' eduational experiences have been fantastic, and I feel like it all happened in such a great gradual way, which was my attempted philosophy of attachment parenting.  The drugfree homebirth, the familyled weaning, a gradual coop nursery school, a charmed kindergaten in public school.  I worked in the public school, creating the bridge for the kids to love the safety of me, as well as developing independence.

 

I'm a huge advocate of free and fantastic schooling for all.  We should all be working to educate, and part of this is developing our children's ability to educate,

mountain is offline  
#39 of 47 Old 05-09-2011, 08:38 AM
 
Heavenly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 4,923
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I don't think that choosing natural parenting methods means that one must homeschool.  We have practiced AP since the beginning - babywearing, non-vaxxing, extended bfing, etc, etc, but after a couple of years of homeschooling I decided it was not for us.  It was a difficult decision but we've found a private school we feel comfortable with and the kids are thriving.  My son has multiple diagnoses and multiple learning disabilities and there is no way I could offer him the help he needs at home.  And my older daughter is gifted and loves being in the school environment.  My youngest is in kindergarten this year, our first child to do kindergarten, and she is thriving.  She loves it so much and it is wonderful experience for her.  I don't regret it for a second.  Some parents can't homeschool, some don't want to, and some children aren't suited for it, be it because of special needs or just personality.  As my children have gotten older I have realized the folly of thinking there is only one rigid way to be a good parent. 


Shawna, married to Michael, mommy to Elijah 1/18/01, Olivia 11/9/02, and Eliana 1/22/06
Heavenly is offline  
#40 of 47 Old 05-09-2011, 10:21 AM
 
NellieKatz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 657
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Sometimes people (like me) homeschool because there are no schools that match our educational approach that are either nearby or affordable. For a while we sent our son to a small, startup democratic free school and we were really hoping to grow the school from two days a week to more, but unfortunately it was too small, we lost some members, and it had to close. Now the closest school of that kind is 45 minutes away, not in our community, and way too expensive for us anyway. So we homeschool and take part in a local educational place that offers various classes for homeschoolers, so we are able to pick and choose which classes we want to send him to (science, math, acting, history, animation etc) and/or what we can afford to. And of course he has Unitarian sunday school. What I wouldn't GIVE to send him back to school so he had somewhere that was meaningful to him where he could go and learn with other kids. (at the democratic free school it was the kids who decided what they would work on, guided by the adult staff members) But the thing with public school is it is so all-or-nothing, and not only that, the whole approach of a public school (and most regular schools) is that the curriculum is something OTHERS decide on, and the timeframe is something OTHERS decide on, it is unrelated to the student's interests (I could go on & on) and the amount of outdoor time is something OTHERS decide on, and then the kids have to go along. So we homeschool. Or whatever you want to call it when you have an eclectic mix of classes and unschooling.  :-)

 

But (and I am not responding to anyone in particular here, just an idea I saw tossed around somewhere in the thread) there's no reliable connection between homeschooling and a desire to keep kids protected from each other and from other ideologies, walks of life, etc.. It's the forced nature of the learning and exposure that we object to. We happen to think that it will kill our son's love of learning, which is the same strong love of learning that he and everyone else is born with. Also, it's important to remember that kids who are homeschooled don't always do their learning literally "at home." Many (like us) believe that kids should be fully in the world, immersed in real life and people of all ages. For us, home is where we have down-time, where we curl up with a book or with each other, where we recharge, or where we study nature for hours in the backyard if we feel like it. The idea of putting him into some system or schedule is just alien to us. He may decide at some point to join a school when he's older, but for now during his formative years I want to keep his love of learning and his place at the helm of that ship intact. (Funny note...as I was typing this he said out of the clear blue sky "Mama.....can you quiz me on Place Value?" And of course I dropped everything. When the kid wants to do math, I come running!)  :-)

 

 

NellieKatz is offline  
#41 of 47 Old 05-09-2011, 12:59 PM
 
beenmum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 273
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

WTB

 

Here is a quick link about it. But it is really what you make it.

 

If you want to schedule a science lesson at 11:00, go for a walk and look at birds. It just means that you arent cracking open a text book every single day and working through a structured curriculum.

 

We use a curriculum b/c unschooling doesnt suit us either.

 

 

http://www.naturalchild.org/guest/earl_stevens.html 

 

http://www.lifelearning.ca/ 

 

Hopefully someone will come in and give you some insight on it.

 

We use A beka. And they have on-line, parent directed on line and text book learning.

 

http://www.abeka.com/ 

 

 

 

 

beenmum is offline  
#42 of 47 Old 05-09-2011, 05:04 PM
 
BubbleMa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 1,572
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by NellieKatz View Post

Sometimes people (like me) homeschool because there are no schools that match our educational approach that are either nearby or affordable. For a while we sent our son to a small, startup democratic free school and we were really hoping to grow the school from two days a week to more, but unfortunately it was too small, we lost some members, and it had to close. Now the closest school of that kind is 45 minutes away, not in our community, and way too expensive for us anyway. So we homeschool and take part in a local educational place that offers various classes for homeschoolers, so we are able to pick and choose which classes we want to send him to (science, math, acting, history, animation etc) and/or what we can afford to. And of course he has Unitarian sunday school. What I wouldn't GIVE to send him back to school so he had somewhere that was meaningful to him where he could go and learn with other kids. (at the democratic free school it was the kids who decided what they would work on, guided by the adult staff members) But the thing with public school is it is so all-or-nothing, and not only that, the whole approach of a public school (and most regular schools) is that the curriculum is something OTHERS decide on, and the timeframe is something OTHERS decide on, it is unrelated to the student's interests (I could go on & on) and the amount of outdoor time is something OTHERS decide on, and then the kids have to go along. So we homeschool. Or whatever you want to call it when you have an eclectic mix of classes and unschooling.  :-)

 

But (and I am not responding to anyone in particular here, just an idea I saw tossed around somewhere in the thread) there's no reliable connection between homeschooling and a desire to keep kids protected from each other and from other ideologies, walks of life, etc.. It's the forced nature of the learning and exposure that we object to. We happen to think that it will kill our son's love of learning, which is the same strong love of learning that he and everyone else is born with. Also, it's important to remember that kids who are homeschooled don't always do their learning literally "at home." Many (like us) believe that kids should be fully in the world, immersed in real life and people of all ages. For us, home is where we have down-time, where we curl up with a book or with each other, where we recharge, or where we study nature for hours in the backyard if we feel like it. The idea of putting him into some system or schedule is just alien to us. He may decide at some point to join a school when he's older, but for now during his formative years I want to keep his love of learning and his place at the helm of that ship intact. (Funny note...as I was typing this he said out of the clear blue sky "Mama.....can you quiz me on Place Value?" And of course I dropped everything. When the kid wants to do math, I come running!)  :-)

 

 


The opposite was true for us.  I homeschooled DD for about a year, when we were living in an area with terrible public schools and no affordable, quality private schools nearby.  Every day was a struggle for us.  There were lots of tears.  We both hated it.  Now that she's in "real" school again, she loves it.  She's excited to go to school every day, and she loves her teacher dearly...sometimes I think more than she loves me.  ;)  Anyway, my point is that every child is different.  Some do very well in the organized, structured, scheduled environment of public school (like my DD) and some don't.

 


Sarah, partner to J and mom to DD1 April 30th, 2002 and DD2 May 5th, 2012. love.gif

BubbleMa is offline  
#43 of 47 Old 05-09-2011, 07:39 PM
 
Linda on the move's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: basking in the sunshine
Posts: 10,546
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BubbleMa View Post
 She's excited to go to school every day, and she loves her teacher dearly...sometimes I think more than she loves me.  ;)  Anyway, my point is that every child is different.  Some do very well in the organized, structured, scheduled environment of public school (like my DD) and some don't.

 


Another former homeschooler here, but for more years. My kids were 10 and 12 when they started school. They love learning in a group, and they both like more structure than  we could manage at home. They love having teachers. And we all enjoy each more with breaks!


I kinda think that what one does when kids are little (like 5) is more about the parents opinions of what education *should* be like, but that as kids get older, if a family is in touch with their kids, it morphs more and more into what actually works best for that particular child with the options where they live. 

 

My oldest starts highschool in the fall, and at this point, no AP mom is still talking about what they, the parent, think. Parents still stuck in their views are really ignoring their kids. Ultimately, being dogmatic about any educational philosophy goes against APing.

 

But this ease of realizing what actually works for your specific child and then making it happen isn't truly available when your child is first starting their school years.  At first, you just make guesses based on what sounds good to you. redface.gif


but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

Linda on the move is online now  
#44 of 47 Old 05-10-2011, 05:58 PM
 
sewchris2642's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: San Diego county, CA
Posts: 1,385
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post

 


Another former homeschooler here, but for more years. My kids were 10 and 12 when they started school. They love learning in a group, and they both like more structure than  we could manage at home. They love having teachers. And we all enjoy each more with breaks!


I kinda think that what one does when kids are little (like 5) is more about the parents opinions of what education *should* be like, but that as kids get older, if a family is in touch with their kids, it morphs more and more into what actually works best for that particular child with the options where they live. 

 

My oldest starts highschool in the fall, and at this point, no AP mom is still talking about what they, the parent, think. Parents still stuck in their views are really ignoring their kids. Ultimately, being dogmatic about any educational philosophy goes against APing.

 

But this ease of realizing what actually works for your specific child and then making it happen isn't truly available when your child is first starting their school years.  At first, you just make guesses based on what sounds good to you. redface.gif




Popping back in with a big thumb.gif  We started out with home school because we were dissatisfied with our elementary school experiences.  Took it one year at a time.  When Joy was 13, she wanted to go to high school so we started her out with 8th grade to give her a feel for school and to cover any gaps in her education.  Erica then decided she wanted to go to school.  She and Angela were enrolled in a public Montessori elementary school--6th and 2nd grade.  Joy then went through all 4 grades in high school.  Erica switched to a home school/classroom schedule through the public school district for 7th through 9th grade; did 10th and 11th grades in high school; and did independent study for 12 th grade and finished the entire year in one semester.  Angela did the Montessori school through 6th grade; did 7th grade in middle school; 8th and 9th in the home school/classroom schedule; repeated 9th grade in high school and finished out her primary education in high school.  Dylan started out in public elementary school; 6th grade at charter school (home school/classroom schedule); this year, he started out 7th grade with the home school/classroom schedule but the 3 days in the classroom was too much (up to 6th grade is only 2 days in a classroom) and is finishing out the year on the 5-day home school schedule and will probably continue the 5-day home school next year for 8th grade.  We will make the decision of where he will go for high school next year together.


Chris--extended breastfeeding, cloth diapering, babywearing, co-sleeping, APing, CLW, homeschooling before any of this was a trend mom to Joy (1/78), Erica (8/80), Angela (9/84), Dylan (2/98)
sewchris2642 is offline  
#45 of 47 Old 05-14-2011, 11:05 PM
 
FarmerBeth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Northeastern Nova Scotia, Canada
Posts: 808
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I think it's so important to go with what works and not get stuck in "camps".  We started at an independent school that was formerly Enki, then Waldorf homeschooled.  The other people we met were almost all AP parents.  I had worked as a doula, breast fed my children to toddlerhood (and then some with one of them), had personally grown up on an organic farm.  We initially switched to public school to be more a part of the community, and because the oldest had special needs that I felt like I needed special input with.  I was so pleasantly surprised at the range of people we met, both those like us and unlike.  Sometimes my kids encounter opinions that are totally different than our family's (a somewhat humorous one in our locale is that squirrels are pests to be killed on the spot, with many boys showing off tail trophies) and it's great because they are learning that basically good people might do or believe things you very much disagree with.  And we've learned that making connections and reaching out to community is an extension of the connection and caring we give to our families, and both connections require tolerance and flexibility.  On the flipside, another person may find more community homeschooling, or the child's needs might be better met that way (our small, rural public school fits for us, but I don't think a larger urban one would).    The important thing is to make decisions on their individual merit, not on which perceived category they belong to.


Busy keeping up with three children and an awful lot of chickens!

FarmerBeth is offline  
#46 of 47 Old 05-15-2011, 07:22 AM
 
ollyoxenfree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,933
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by FarmerBeth View Post

 I was so pleasantly surprised at the range of people we met, both those like us and unlike. Sometimes my kids encounter opinions that are totally different than our family's (a somewhat humorous one in our locale is that squirrels are pests to be killed on the spot, with many boys showing off tail trophies) and it's great because they are learning that basically good people might do or believe things you very much disagree with. And we've learned that making connections and reaching out to community is an extension of the connection and caring we give to our families, and both connections require tolerance and flexibility.  


I think this is an important aspect of schooling outside the home, not just for different ideas, but also for different teaching methods and approaches to learning.

 

OP, you asked about encouraging "outside the box' thinking, and there is a general impression that homeschoolers have the advantage over those lock-step public schoolers for teaching methods, creative thinking and approaches to learning. Yet, I've known university professors who have identified the opposite trend in the homeschoolers that they teach at the college level. They find that homeschoolers become rigid in their approach to studying. Because they haven't confronted different teaching and classroom styles, homeschoolers are comfortable with one way of studying and have some difficulty adjusting when they start college and find themselves faced with a half-dozen different teachers who may approach things very differently.

 

Often, formally schooled students have already gone through this experience and worked through how to adjust to different teachers. They are more tolerant of the problem, less likely to panic when it happens and more flexible in solving the problem. The formally schooled students are less likely to ask the college professor to change how the professor teaches, the type of assignments given or even the course curriculum and more likely to try different studying and work strategies to cope.      

 

Obviously, there are ways for homeschoolers to avoid this problem, but it bears consideration if you do decide to homeschool.

 

 

 

ollyoxenfree is offline  
#47 of 47 Old 05-15-2011, 12:19 PM
 
transylvania_mom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: abroad
Posts: 1,080
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I consider myself pretty AP (we CLW, co-sleep, GD, SAHP), but chose public schooling. Having had overall positive experiences in school, both as a teacher and as a student, the best choice for us is public schooling. I think homeschooling is a great option, and I would consider it if circumstances were different. But ds loves going to his school, he has many friends there, he loves his teacher, he's currently learning his third language there, so I don't see why I would deprive him of that, just to adhere to a supposed AP standard.


caffix.gif

transylvania_mom is offline  
Reply

Tags
Homeschooling , The Imperfect Homeschoolers Guide To Homeschooling A 20 Year Homeschool Veteran Reveals How To Teach , American School Counselor Association , School

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off