Sensory Processing Disorder - Me?! - Mothering Forums

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Old 06-18-2011, 11:13 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Hi there, 

I just checked the symptom list for the sensory processing disorder because both of my kids are quite explosive and stuff, and I think I might have it! I can check nearly everything on the hypersensitivity list! Some things are slightly different, for example I don´t like dirty hands (therefor I have a huge kitchen helper thingie) but I hate the feeling of freshly washed hands even more, I avoid washing hand if I don´t have a hand lotion in reach - I cannot stand this funny feeling on the skin (same after showering). 

I do remember the most horrible events in my childhood when my dad pulled me out of the bathroom (after having broken in) to get me to cut my nails - I was screaming the whole time since it felt so horrible, and it did for a couple of days afterwards, I was not able to touch anything for days, I still don´t have really short nails. I don´t touch certain type of things which are supposed to be soft - I don´t know, it gives me shivers only to think about them. 

 

so, what does it mean, does it mean anything? Does it do something to my parenting? ( I am very careful with nail cutting :) ) 

 

I think my kiddos are more hypo - than hypersensitive.

Suggestions?


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Old 06-18-2011, 11:35 AM
 
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I was just coming on here to ask about spd. But, for my kids. I would try posing in the special needs forum too. They have more experience and a ton of good advice.


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Old 06-18-2011, 04:14 PM
 
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After researching SPD for my DS -- he is in EI for his sensory issues now -- I discovered I have it too... DS's OT said that adults do receive sensory therapy (even SHE somehow picked up on my sensory issues just while she playing with DS!), I kind of wanted to ask her more about it but felt weird so I didn't ask. It does affect my life and my parenting quite a bit, but I've also really learned to cope over the years. So I don't know, but it's interesting to hear another adult with these kind of issues.

What's pretty cool to me is that DS and I have many similarities in our issues, so I think it really helps me to help DS and naturally provide what he needs. We are both very noise sensitive, for ex., and both are hypo-sensitive orally, and both need certain types of touch for the touch to feel good rather than horrible. It works out well except that he is often miserable with other people and just wants to be with me. And some of our issues are opposite, so things like, I don't know, taking a shower/bath at the same time can be really difficult for us because I need burning-hot water an he needs it to be cool.

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Old 06-21-2011, 09:05 PM
 
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i think many adults have it without knowing they do. while SPD is a relatively new discovery or label its been around for ages. i know my now 90 year xMIL is STILL hypersensitive to many things.

 

for me it really helped having MIL 'get' what dd was going through. i thought dd was throwing a tantrum, but xMIL pointed out how extremely 'painful' those experiences are even if they dont look normal to most people. the public high pressure flush, bunched socks, socks seams and some clothes labels are painful to some people.

 

ex is also v. sensitive to sound. and watching him suffer really taught me to have a deeper understanding of what dd is going thru.  

 

like everyone would blow off dd's stomach aches as pretend. till i realised they were due to anxiety and VERY MUCH real. 

 

i dont say i have typical SPD but i have two things. its painful for me to sleep on a soft bed. i wake up with aches and pains all over my body. i have no problems with hard beds - even a blanket on concrete (blanket to stop chafe my joints, not for softness). no matter how hot i am i HAVE TO have a sheet or blanket on me. i need that weight on me or i cant fall asleep. i call them my quirkyness, not SPD. 


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Old 06-21-2011, 10:36 PM
 
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I suspect I have SPD too. I have most of the hypersensitivity symptoms. My doctor suggested seeing a neurologist but I haven't had the chance.

 

Does anybody know what treatment entails for an adult? I asked on the Health and Healing board the other day, but no one's answered yet.

 

I was thinking of myself as someone with "anger issues" but I wonder if that's directly related to my sensory issues. Most of my rage is in situations with really annoying sounds or when I'm otherwise overstimulated. (I can totally sympathize with any tantruming toddler in a crowded grocery store. I hate crowded grocery stores! Shopping with someone else is so annoying.) I do think I need treatment or more coping techniques or something before I have kids. I think the only reason I haven't murdered my younger brother is because I didn't have to be around him too often, but I won't have that option with my own child (and wouldn't want to be away from my child anyway). 

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Old 06-22-2011, 12:29 AM
 
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Me. I'm pretty hypersensitive. the two thing that still really affect my daily life and parenting are: I can't stand any touch that's even slightly ticklish, and I get overstimulated by sound. I also have a lot of taste/texture issues with food, but I can just avoid those foods. everything else I've been dealing with for so long that I don't notice anymore. so far DD seems to have a lot of noise sensitivities (like freaks out when we vacuum, won't go in the bathroom if the fan is on, etc.)


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Old 06-22-2011, 12:48 AM
 
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I am absolutely convinced I have SPD.  It's complicated by a lot of my trauma issues, so I really don't know what to do about it.  I've learned work arounds for a lot of it.  I can't eat crunchy food, for example.  If it makes that sound in my mouth I have an intense whole body feeling of AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH.  It's just not ok.  It can make me want to shove my head through a window just to distract me from the sensation.  It's awful.  I have to have clothes on all the time because the feeling of air on my skin makes me severely uncomfortable.  I hate showers.  They feel painful.  I like hot tubs/baths though.  I can't stand it when people put the jets on.  I feel like I am drowning because of the force of the water moving on my skin.

 

It's no fun.  I just try to get through.  I have no idea if anything could really be done about it and I can't deal with doctors enough to find out. :-\


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Old 06-22-2011, 08:11 AM
 
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My mother is an OT.  She started her career working in a psych ward in a hospital with adults, but gradually transitioned to working with kids, and now specializes in little kids 0-3years old.  I still remember being a guinea pig for her when she was getting her certification for the sensory processing evaluation.

 

My DS (6 yo) has several quirks/sensory processing issues, but I don't view any of them as major (aside from his extreme carsickness).  When my mom was evaluating my son, I was making lots of comments about my own issues (which I never had as a child), and we did a lot of joking about what a terrible mother/OT she was to have missed seeing all my issues (which all seem to have developed since adulthood).  I hate walking barefoot on the grass, for example, but I remember enjoying the sensation as a kid. 

 

Anyway, the first step is awareness.  If you can identify the issue and come up with a workaround, great!  If your issue is affecting your quality of life, though, then please, do contact an Occupational Therapist.  Some specialize in children, others only treat adults.  Do mention you suspect you have sensory integration issues, and ask if they have experience or certification dealing with that (I'm not sure if the certification is only required when working with children, and my mom's not available to ask right now).  There are a variety of activities/treatments an OT can try on you, and teach you how to do (or have a partner do to you, depending on what it is).  As always, though, everybody's wired differently, so what works great for one person might not be very effective for somebody else.  Experimentation is required.

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Old 06-23-2011, 12:01 PM
 
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I have SPD.  I have not been diagnosed but I know that I have it.  I have a hard time wearing my hair down because it tickles.  I can't wear anything with strings or pants without socks because my pants tickle my feet.  The worst is when I nurse.  While I nurse I literally rub my feet together until they bleed because I can't stand the sensation.  I thought there was something wrong with me because when I read to my children I start to panic because they are all around me touching me lightly.  They now know they have to stay back.  They can touch me but not lightly.  I read that this can happen if you were not held as a baby.  I was in an incubator for some time when I was an infant.  I also read this can develop when you are an adult.  Mine started in college. 

I can live with it but it isn't fun. :(  When I am touched lightly or nurse I am overly sensitized. 

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Old 06-27-2011, 02:58 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you all for your input, I had no idea that there are so many people with this problems, I always felt a bit weird. Being the one girl in class with rather long fingernails, since it was literally painfull to get the clipped. They are still rather long, especially considering my profession.

I hate it when my kids stroke me or touch me lightly as well! I cannot stand it. It is so uncomfortable! I hope it does not hurt them if I tell them to stop it immediatly (I try to stay calm and everything) but they cannot stroke their mommy. Rather sad, isn´t it? My DD loves to play with my hair. AAaaaarrrgh!

I need a blanket at all times as well, and my body needs to be covered up to the neck. Otherwise no chance of sleeping. I hate to walk barefoot. Even in our kitchen, because the floor feels funny.

I hate going shopping in crowded places, and I  hate shopping for clothes, because I hate to change.

 

I am so happy that there are people out there who can relate! joy.gif


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Old 06-27-2011, 07:29 AM
 
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Yes it is nice to relate to someone!  I can't drive with the window down because my hair tickles my face.  I have a hard time when my hair is down most of the time.  I do find it sad that the kids can't touch me lightly. :(  One of the things I do is hold their hand instead so they stop touching me.  They know when I say...Stop touching me, I am in a tickly mood they know to not touch.  It is bad when I nurse.  No one can touch me because the sensation is too much. 

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Old 07-12-2011, 08:12 PM
 
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I read someone posted to see an OT, but are there any DIY treatment/coping ideas?

 

I've just started to wonder about myself because Dh is getting exasperated with my inability to tolerate seemingly innocuous things and that leading to my parenting skills becoming less than compassionate & loving in those moments. 

 

I cannot handle my daughter touching me lightly, like a pp said.  I try to stay as calm as possible, but my DD NEVER EVER sits still & if we are touching then she is moving against my skin & it drives me batty.  I agree it is sad, I want my DD to be able to snuggle & be close to me, but sometimes I just can't take it anymore & I flip out.  The majority of the day I'm able to consciously control the experience & deal with it, but especially as it gets closer to bedtime I lose my ability to cope.  My favorite time is after she's fallen asleep & we are cuddling but she's finally not. moving. a. muscle.

 

I hate the feel of cotton balls.  It's so disgusting I have a physical aversion & my hand will drop the cotton ball automatically.

 

I can't stand the sound of someone chewing/eating food. 

 

I can't wear turtlenecks or have anyone/thing touch my throat.

 

Nursing got to be maddening, luckily my DD self weaned a few months ago but the sensation was always, from the very beginning, unpleasant. 

 

Clothing must be *just so* or I can't handle it, no folds or wrinkles is the biggest one.

 

I can get overstimulated by noise until I literally can't think straight.

 

If I overheat I can't cope with any sound, touch, smell, etc. in my environment that is intense.

 

Phew, it's weird to list all those out and that's only the stuff I can think of off the top of my head.  It's only becoming a Mother that has brought to light how much of an impact on my life these things are.  Any suggestions about how to cope and specifically how to relate to my DD in a way that isn't negative when I cannot cope?  I don't like how sad she can get sometimes when I have to get away from her - I can only imagine it feels like a rejection. 


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Old 07-19-2011, 07:03 PM
 
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Ugh, I talked to my doctor about having SPD symptoms during my last visist, and she said I'd need to see a neurologist for that. She said I shouldn't even need a referal with my insurance. But when I called the neurologist, the receptionist wouldn't even let me make an appointment. They wanted some packet of info from the doctor. So I called the doctor about that, but the doctor's receptionist didn't know what to send. (I don't even remember if the neurology receptionist had told me what they were supposed to send.) The doctor's receptionist decided to ask the doctor about it. A few days later they called me back to ask why I was wanting to see a neurologist, even though I'm pretty sure I said that in the prior phone conversation. When I explained that's what the doctor had suggested, the receptionist responded, "So you HAVE seen [doctor's name] about this?" which suggests the doctor had given her the opposite impression. The receptionist is going to talk to the doctor again. Ugh! I just want to find out what's wrong with me and get some treatment, jeez. greensad.gif

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