DD (5yo) is in the 97th percentile for BMI...doc says she's in the obese category - Page 4 - Mothering Forums

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#91 of 99 Old 10-02-2011, 09:08 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post

No - the point is that it doesn't matter what you say to your kid, because that's what's happening. The doctor says her dd is too fat, and she needs to determine if there's a medical reason. There is no way to honestly answer a child's questions about why they're getting blood work that isn't going to come down to "you're so fat that the doctor thinks you're sick" whether you ever actually use those words or not.

 

Personally, I see the odds of this whole thing triggering issues in the OP's dd as a lot higher than the odds that there's actually a problem. The OP has to make her own decision, obviously. I wouldn't get the blood work or see the nutritionist...and I probably wouldn't go back until the next well child visit (if I did them) unless I noticed her weight going up).



I'm not going to read past here because I have to leave the computer.

 

I would run the tests.  It's not about "you are too fat" for me it is about "hunh, this is outside your normal growth curve, more data might be helpful".  And my three year old can handle a blood draw.  Does she cry for a couple of seconds?  Yes.  But when it's done we hug and she says that it sucks and we go cuddle on the couch for a while.  It's not a big drama.  More data is always better than less data for me.  

 

I'm not interested in "controlling" my childrens weight.  My older daughter has been everywhere from 97% to 24%.  It really depends on where you catch her in the growth spurt cycle.  For her, I wouldn't run tests because she has bounced up and down every time we have been in to the doctors office all her life from the bottom of the chart to the top of the chart and I can promise you I don't alternate starving her with feeding her like a goose meant for paté.  

 

If my younger daughter, who has sat between 51% and 56% so far suddenly dramatically changed percentages I'd be very open to tests.  Not because I care if she's fat.  If anything I think she is on the skinny looking side because I got used to having the Michelin baby and I loved it.  I like data.  Data is awesome.

 

Medical stuff doesn't have to be scary.  I know that is a hard area for some people.  I understand that.  I have had a lot of medical/dental fears/phobia issues.  I have to get over them in order to model for my kids how to receive adequate care.  My three year old tends to be more calm than I feel.  It is very hard.  But I do it.


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#92 of 99 Old 10-02-2011, 09:09 AM
 
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A jump in weight/height ratio (which is kind of what bmi is) often happens with kids before a rapid increase in height. First they gain weight, then they grow taller. I have watched my kids do this for their whole lives.

 

I would just keep feeding her good foods, though I would watch carbolicious snacky stuff that is grain based (like goldfish, that kind of stuff), even if it is organic. But I would say that about everyone in general.

 

She looks so beautiful and happy -- I'm glad you shared her with us :-)

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#93 of 99 Old 10-02-2011, 11:24 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rightkindofme View Post

I'm not going to read past here because I have to leave the computer.

 

I would run the tests.  It's not about "you are too fat" for me it is about "hunh, this is outside your normal growth curve, more data might be helpful".  And my three year old can handle a blood draw.  Does she cry for a couple of seconds?  Yes.  But when it's done we hug and she says that it sucks and we go cuddle on the couch for a while.  It's not a big drama.  More data is always better than less data for me.  

 

I'm not interested in "controlling" my childrens weight.  My older daughter has been everywhere from 97% to 24%.  It really depends on where you catch her in the growth spurt cycle.  For her, I wouldn't run tests because she has bounced up and down every time we have been in to the doctors office all her life from the bottom of the chart to the top of the chart and I can promise you I don't alternate starving her with feeding her like a goose meant for paté.  

 

If my younger daughter, who has sat between 51% and 56% so far suddenly dramatically changed percentages I'd be very open to tests.  Not because I care if she's fat.  If anything I think she is on the skinny looking side because I got used to having the Michelin baby and I loved it.  I like data.  Data is awesome.

 

Medical stuff doesn't have to be scary.  I know that is a hard area for some people.  I understand that.  I have had a lot of medical/dental fears/phobia issues.  I have to get over them in order to model for my kids how to receive adequate care.  My three year old tends to be more calm than I feel.  It is very hard.  But I do it.



My issue is that I don't see this BMI as "data" in any real sense. A BMI (fairly useless, imo, anyway) being taken at long intervals (I'm assuming these are annual checkups) on a growing child is completely useless. If the BMI were still in the 97% percentile (assuming it even was, which it doesn't seem to have been) in a few months, then I could see your point. But, this number isn't data, in any meaningful sense. I'd actually be willing to put down money to say that, if we checked BMI on growing children every couple of weeks, we'd see large fluctuations over time in a huge number of those kids. I've met a handful of children in my life who seem to grow fairly evenly, but the vast majority of them do the "get thicker, sprout up, get thicker, sprout up, get thicker, sprout up" cycle over and over again....and those cycles don't always come at nice, even intervals.

 

re: medical stuff being scary. I have medical fears, yes. I'm not going to model how to receive adquate care for my kids, in the sense you mean. I overcame those fears several times in my life, and every one of them has ended really, really badly for me. IMO, teaching my children to totally trust doctors would be insanely irresponsbible. I'll teach them that doctors are a tool and resource, to use if and when they choose to do so. I'll be calling my GP tomorrow, to get a referral to a dermatologist for dd1, because I'm not comfortable with the recommendation he already gave me for dealing with the issue at hand (dd1 has a wart growing straight down from the top of one of her nostrils, and the location makes treating it unusually complicated).

 

However, my concerns here aren't really about whether medical issues are scary. (Personally, I'm not bothered by needles, except for spinal anesthesia - getting a needle in my spine wigs me out, as does the anesthesia itself - and never have been, as far as I can recall...vaccines, blood tests, blood donation, IVs...they don't bother me. DS1 has always coped with them okay. DD1 gets kind of hysterical at the thought, which is in keeping with her personality. DS2 is in line for blood work right now, and he's not thrilled about it, but will probably bounce back pretty quickly afterwards.) It's about treating a child's weight and growth as a medical issue, on such a flimsy basis. There are more than enough messed up, unhealthy ideas about weight and physiques, especially for girls, in this culture, without pushing the freaking "OMG - you're obese - something's wrong with you", button over a child having a bit of a tummy. I've seen too many girls who weren't fat become convinced that they were, because they didn't have a naturally small build (large frames, unusually bulky musculature, etc.).


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#94 of 99 Old 10-02-2011, 12:19 PM
 
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I thought bmi was completely defunct as being a gimic and inadaquate way of telling jack. The only way you can tell bmi is from a special full body contraption such as water or a body containment unit.. weight ratio doesn't measure bmi at all.

The daughter looks fit and beautiful. This pediatrician is a hater or being paid by the nutritionist to get referals. he's out of his mind.
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#95 of 99 Old 10-02-2011, 12:30 PM
 
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Honestly, with the beautiful pictures you posted, the menus she eats, all her exercise ... that child looks super freakin' healthy!  Way to go!  


I would probably check in at your next doctor's visit and ask for a fuller explanation from the doctor.  I wouldn't do the testing because there are no signs of distress.  Your daughter's weight clearly fits her body.  There are no signs of fatigue or illness.  It goes beyond will she be traumatized by the blood draw for me.  How about just a waste of time, insurance money and overuse of medical resources ... in the face of zero sign of illness.

 

My five year old is a little more slender than yours overall, forget the numbers ... but she has the same tummy.  Love it.  

 

My seven year old has always been very thin, even as a baby.  Her percentages were off the bell curve at one point.  But she was healthy and eating.  The only corrective offered by the ped (now former ped) was to give her formula.  He** yah.

 

I know how upsetting it can be for a doctor to suddenly flag a child for something so fundamental as their weight -- in my case, some small part of me had a new fear that my child was somehow underweight and would starve.  I have let that go.  I hope you don't get set with the same fear -- that your beautiful child is somehow overweight.

 

Absent very obvious problem, for myself, I oppose dieting.  I eat when hungry and eat in the middle of the spectrum in terms of healthy.  Where I will put effort and discipline is exercise.  

 

I guess, short of true, obvious obesity, I can't imagine, therefore, ever restricting my kids' food.  I do restrict junk food and balance carbs with protein.  But ... healthy stuff ... only their bodies know how much to eat.  

 

 


Kids. I got two of 'em.
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#96 of 99 Old 10-02-2011, 04:02 PM
 
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BMI should be thrown out. The only people with a perfect BMI are either genetically blessed or scrawny and lazy... sorry to those offended. After years of being a trainer... I shake my head at those who are consumed with a BMI just as much as those who are concerned with the numbers on the scale. She is little and not fat at all. Kids eat quite a bit before a growth spurt, they put on a little weight then they sprout up. As you'll notice it's beneficial. Think about those who were skinny their whole lives with loads of stretch marks. Their bodies didn't add on the pounds before they grew... they just grew. It's normal it's natural.
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#97 of 99 Old 10-02-2011, 07:15 PM
 
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She is a pretty tall girl so i think that accounts for a lot of it, as well, like u said, muscle weighs more than fat. That said, in total honesty, she does look to have a bit of a belly, but again, that is just the body type of some ppl.
I do know that my daughter is not a super thin body type (has a booty and beginning of hips lol) also is athletic and has a little six pack, but is 71 lbs and 55 inches. I have no idea what her BMI is or her percentile nor do i feel the need to find out. I have no doubts that she is healthy..eats lots of veggies and fruit, is very athletic and has good cardio endurance..thats enough for me! So i would say keep an eye on all of those factors, but otherwise take it as a grain of salt and trust your mommy instincts.
As for the tests, i would probably go along with anything minimally invasive to err on the side of caution
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#98 of 99 Old 10-03-2011, 11:11 AM
 
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My seven year old son is 48 inches tall and 58.5 lbs - nearly the same as your daughter. He is lean and fit. I can see his ribs, and he has ABS! hehe.  I think your daughter looks perfectly healthy. I do not see an overweight child in the pics, let alone an obese one!


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#99 of 99 Old 10-04-2011, 03:28 PM
 
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For what it is worth, my BMI always said I was overweight, even when I'd play sports at least two hours a day. That was on top of P.E. at school. When they used calipers, my estimated body fat was well-within a healthy range. I am definitely overweight now, but I still disregard BMI. I have a condition that causes muscle rigidity and spasms, and I still have a decent amount of muscle weight under the chubs.

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