DD (5yo) is in the 97th percentile for BMI...doc says she's in the obese category - Mothering Forums
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#1 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 10:38 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I am so confused, mamas. We just returned from our pediatrician's office where DD had her 5yr check-up. The ped was shocked to see the jump in her percentile in the BMI category, from 70th% last year to 97th percentile this year. Ped is worried about obesity. DD is a solid kid but never in a million years would I consider her obese. She weighs 56.8lbs and is 47 inches tall. She turned 5 two weeks ago. She is incredibly active, eats healthy and organic and seems to self-regulate. How much stock do you all put into BMI percentiles? Ped wants blood tests run to check thyroid, etc. and then wants to refer us to a nutritionist. I cook from scratch, use mostly organic, my kids eat an unusually large amount of fruits and veggies, very little junk, very little fast food, etc. Portions might be larger than most kids, but she's hungry because she burns so much energy each day.

Just for perspective, I'm also posting a picture of her...maybe you all might see something that I don't.

AGH! I'm feeling like a bit of a failure right now. I have worked really hard to make sure my kids eat healthy, all of our friends, family and classmates are amazed at what our kids eat and how healthy they are.

Anyway, I'd love to hear perspectives and experiences.

Thanks so much!

Taken 3 months ago:
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This was taken 1 month ago...she's the one on the right. The other little girl is about 9 months older than her.
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#2 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 10:50 AM
 
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New pediatrician time?  That is ridiculous she is NOT overweight!!!


DS (6.06), DD (10.08), DD (05.11).

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#3 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 10:57 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Up until today I totally loved our ped. She owns the only holistic ped practice within 250 miles of us. For years, she has been supportive of our choices, non-judgemental, offering natural alternatives, etc. I think that's one of the reasons I'm so worried. It's like, if she thinks it's a big deal, it must be. She is not over-reactive by nature (quite the opposite actually).

Thanks for the reply and reassurance.
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#4 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 10:58 AM
 
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I dn't trust BMI at all, even for adults. I trust it even less for young children. I see a perfectly normal looking, healthy looking little girl. In the second picture, I see a little bit of a tummy, but it's the kind of tummy I see on lots of young chlidren, and it doesn't mean anything...except possibly that she's facing a growth spurt in the very near future.

 

IMO, your ped is out to lunch. Aside from the fact that the little girl in your photos is clearly not obese, there's no reason to jump to blood tests, nutritionist, etc. based on one visit! If she does happen to have a growth spurt coming up, that little bit of tummy is even more meaningless than it would be otherwise.

 

I'd find a new ped...or just skip the well child checks completely. My kids haven't had a well child checkup in ages. DD2's last one was either 9 months or a year, and she's 2+ now...and the others haven't been in for years...my GP (it would be very unusual to have a pediatrician doing well baby/child checks around here) saw dd1 to confirm that some growths on her face are warts last week, and he said, "Hi, dd1, how are you? We haven't seen you in here in a long time - you don't come in much - good for you!" with a strong implication that he really only expects to see kids when they're sick, and she basically never gets sick.

 

Honestly, I've seen soooooo many posts here over the years where a ped has caused some mama concern about her child, because of BMI, obesity concerns, etc., when the child appears to be completely healthy and happy - and usually active. It's weird. I know there are major concerns about the impact of obesity on public health (mind you, I also think that the focus on obesity, instead of on the causes of obesity, is off target), but the way it's translating into action where children are concerned is something I find worrisome.


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#5 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 11:00 AM
 
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With the attention childhood obesity is getting from Washington, in the media, and basically all over doctors are getting a lot of pressure to identify and reduce the number of kids who are obese. I think it makes them a bit quick at times to jump to the issue.

 

At this point I would simply tell him you would like to wait and see if this is the start of a growth spurt and don't choose to do anything about it at this time, but would be happy to revisit the issue in the future if concerns continue.

 

A quick conversion to cm (120cm) and look at the WHO charts shows that she would be above the 95th percentile for height as well as for weight. As long as she is at a similar range for weight and height I don't see that their is anything really to worry about. Realistically a child in the 95th percentile for height would be underweight were she at the 50th percentile for weight.

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#6 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 11:02 AM
 
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I wouldn't call her "fat", but she's not lean.  It's not necessarily a bad thing.  It does depend on how healthy she is otherwise.  I know 2 little girls about the same age and size as your DD.  One eats very healthy.  You can just tell her mom is on top of it.  She never refuses fruits and veggies and is eager to try unfamiliar foods.  The other one practically lives on carbs.  Her dad drops her off at daycare everyday with a huge bagel and cream cheese from tim hortons, or a breakfast sandwich and donuts.  Flavored milk, the whole nine yards.  She eats a LOT and it's usually bad stuff.  The girl who eats healthy, you can tell she's just built like that.  Her mom is a larger lady too.  Very tall and a larger frame (NOT fat).  The other little girl's mom is very lean and smaller framed.

 

I can't imagine it would hurt to see if there's something more going on, unless you really think it's just genetics.  How are you and dad built now?  As kids?  What about her siblings?

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#7 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 11:10 AM
 
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Your ped is a moron.  She isn't obese and as long as you are teaching her healthy eating habits, she'll be fine.  Kids are all built differently and alot of times a kid will get rounder and then shoot up during a growth spurt.  My 5 year old is roughly the same size.  He isn't fat at all though he's always been in the 85-95%.  Your daughter is beautiful and looks totally healthy to me!
 

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Originally Posted by bandgeek View Post

I wouldn't call her "fat", but she's not lean.  It's not necessarily a bad thing.  It does depend on how healthy she is otherwise.  I know 2 little girls about the same age and size as your DD.  One eats very healthy.  You can just tell her mom is on top of it.  She never refuses fruits and veggies and is eager to try unfamiliar foods.  The other one practically lives on carbs.  Her dad drops her off at daycare everyday with a huge bagel and cream cheese from tim hortons, or a breakfast sandwich and donuts.  Flavored milk, the whole nine yards.  She eats a LOT and it's usually bad stuff.  The girl who eats healthy, you can tell she's just built like that.  Her mom is a larger lady too.  Very tall and a larger frame (NOT fat).  The other little girl's mom is very lean and smaller framed.

 

I can't imagine it would hurt to see if there's something more going on, unless you really think it's just genetics.  How are you and dad built now?  As kids?  What about her siblings?



That's a whole lot of judgment there.  If you looked at my youngest son walking along beside me, we don't "fit".  He's built exactly like his dad.  My older son is exactly like me. And they both eat the exact same way.  I hate the thought that people see me with my kids and assume I'm feeding them wrong because of their body type.

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#8 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 11:16 AM
 
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That's a whole lot of judgment there.  If you looked at my youngest son walking along beside me, we don't "fit".  He's built exactly like his dad.  My older son is exactly like me. And they both eat the exact same way.  I hate the thought that people see me with my kids and assume I'm feeding them wrong because of their body type.

 

Did you even read my whole post?  I see what these kids eat every day.  And I'm sorry, but kids often DO take after their parents.  Not always, but if I see you overfeeding your child simple carbs every single day of the week and your 5 year old is already as big around as you, I will assume it's not "just genetics" making her heavy.  It's as easy as adding 2 and 2.  If that's judgmental, then I'm guilty.  It doesn't make a person a bad parent, but probably misguided or uninformed.  I was trying to point out to the OP that there's a difference and gave her examples so she can see where I'm coming from.  This isn't about your kid, or you as a parent.  There's no reason to be defensive, *especially* if you really do feed your child a healthy diet.
 

 

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#9 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 11:27 AM
 
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Your daughter is a lovely little girl and doesn't look in the least bit overweight.

 

My DS is solid. He takes after his mama! smile.gif This is *not* a euphemism for fat! He is active, eats lots and lots of fresh fruit and veg, and is active (bikes to and from school every day, etc.) His BMI is high for his height too. But he's not at all fat and we don't worry about it.

 

If your little girl is active, eating a healthy diet, and growing normally, I'd just let it go.

 

I think your ped was probably having an off day and was, as a PP said, under a lot of pressure from the recent media blitzes on the issue. If you like her, stick with her (or at least bring this up with her) and I bet it won't come up again.

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#10 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 11:32 AM
 
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I entered your dd's numbers into an online kid's BMI calculator and it said 94 percentile and "at risk for being overweight".

Scrolling down the page it said "Since body mass index doesn't directly measure body fat, it is possible to be overweight but not obese. Some kids who are very athletic and have a large muscle mass, may be overweight, but if they do not have excess body fat, then they do not need help with weight loss." from http://pediatrics.about.com/cs/usefultools/l/bl_bmi_results.htm?test=1&gender=2&age=5&months=0&cwt=56.8&chf=3&chi=11

 

I guess I wouldn't worry about your dd's lifestyle since you know she eats really healthy food and gets lots of exercise but I wouldn't blow the health concern off entirely if there has been a big jump in weight or bmi. If the doctor you liked who typically doesn't overreact suggested the blood test then it might be worth looking into or monitoring just to be sure there isn't anything else going on that would cause a big gain.  It doesn't mean you are a bad parent or that your child is doomed just to get things checked out. http://www.medicalonly.com/2008/07/09/weightgain_children_hypothyroid http://altmedicine.about.com/cs/treatments/a/WeightGain.htm


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#11 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 11:34 AM
 
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Originally Posted by bandgeek View Post

I wouldn't call her "fat", but she's not lean.  It's not necessarily a bad thing.

 

I don't really think you meant it this way, but this comes across really, really, really badly. You're right - not being lean isn't "necessarily" a bad thing. Many kids just don't have "lean" builds. FWIW, I know five children who are clearly not eating well, and are not in fabulous health. Three of them - siblings - are obese (not "overweight", but definitely obese...one of them has such a huge frame - literally a head taller than any other child in his class - that I can't be sure, but I suspect he's morbidly obese). The other two - not related to each other - are skinny as rails. The heavy kids eat a lot of junk, and not much else. The two skinny kids eat a smaller amount of junk, and not much else. The skinny kids also come from very petite parents, and are kicked outside to play, while the heavy siblings are allowed to spend a lot of time in front of screens, and have big parents (the dad has never been obese - the mom has been, but has also been a healthy weight, but not healthy, a lot - but both parents have huge frames, big bones, etc.). So, there are differences, and the exercise level is definitely important...but none of them are very healthy, and they're on opposite ends of the weight spectrum.

 

However, the whole way you phrased these two sentences is kind of...obnoxious? offensive? I can't find quite the right word. Turn it around, and see how it sounds if you say, "I wouldn't call her "skinny", but she's not sturdy. That's not necessarily a bad thing". It really comes across as though the default is that not being lean (or "sturdy", in my example) is probably a bad thing, but might not be, in unusual circumstances. There were a lot of kids around with builds like the OP's dd when I was a kid...and none of the ones I kept in touch with or see around town grew up to have weight problems. I think her dd has a very normal body size and shape for her age. (Oddly enough, I was slimmer than that as a young chlid...and I'm morbidly obese. There are a WHOLE lot of potential factors at play where obesity is concerned. In my case, the causes are about 95% psychological.)

 

And, I'm not taking any of this personally. DS1 was always skinny, and has been "buff" (he was his high school's gymnastics team captain last year). DD1 is also very slim. I have some concerns about ds2's weight and body shape, but the ped (went to see her for something specific this summer) has no concerns at all. I don't have a dog in this fight. I just really dislike the way the "obesity epidemic" is affecting the way we look at children's bodies.


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#12 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 11:39 AM
 
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Originally Posted by onlyzombiecat View Post

I entered your dd's numbers into an online kid's BMI calculator and it said 94 percentile and "at risk for being overweight".

Scrolling down the page it said "Since body mass index doesn't directly measure body fat, it is possible to be overweight but not obese. Some kids who are very athletic and have a large muscle mass, may be overweight, but if they do not have excess body fat, then they do not need help with weight loss." from http://pediatrics.about.com/cs/usefultools/l/bl_bmi_results.htm?test=1&gender=2&age=5&months=0&cwt=56.8&chf=3&chi=11

 

I guess I wouldn't worry about your dd's lifestyle since you know she eats really healthy food and gets lots of exercise but I wouldn't blow the health concern off entirely if there has been a big jump in weight or bmi. If the doctor you liked who typically doesn't overreact suggested the blood test then it might be worth looking into or monitoring just to be sure there isn't anything else going on that would cause a big gain.  It doesn't mean you are a bad parent or that your child is doomed just to get things checked out. http://www.medicalonly.com/2008/07/09/weightgain_children_hypothyroid http://altmedicine.about.com/cs/treatments/a/WeightGain.htm



The part I bolded doesn't even make sense. "Overweight" and "obese" are separate categories, which fall under different BMI ranges, anyway. You can be "overweight", but not "obese", just on BMI, without percentage body fat even coming into the equation. The terminology here is all screwed up.

 

ETA: Never mind. I just read a bunch of stuff about BMI categories for kids. Ugh. I don't think most of this is going to accomplish squat in battling childhood obesity...but I between the massive onslaught of junk food, and the attempts to combat obesity in children, I wouldn't be at all surprised to see an massive increase in the diagnosis of eating disorders in another 10-15 years.


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#13 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 11:48 AM
 
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Did you even read my whole post?  I see what these kids eat every day.  And I'm sorry, but kids often DO take after their parents.  Not always, but if I see you overfeeding your child simple carbs every single day of the week and your 5 year old is already as big around as you, I will assume it's not "just genetics" making her heavy.  It's as easy as adding 2 and 2.  If that's judgmental, then I'm guilty.  It doesn't make a person a bad parent, but probably misguided or uninformed.  I was trying to point out to the OP that there's a difference and gave her examples so she can see where I'm coming from.  This isn't about your kid, or you as a parent.  There's no reason to be defensive, *especially* if you really do feed your child a healthy diet.
 

 


I did read your whole post.  And it's full of judgment.  Your very first sentence was "she's not fat, but she's not lean".  The op's daughter is a perfectly healthy size, she's active, she has a good diet.  And you brush all that aside with that one phrase like there's a problem with the fact that she isn't "lean".   It just comes across like there is a problem not just an over zealous ped when in reality the op's daughter is probably completely fine and at her next check up the ped might not even mention her size/bmi because she's hit a growth spurt.

 

I'm not taking this personally btw, this is just another example of how society feels the need to pressure 5 year olds into being a certain size or shape.  Completely ignoring the fact that bodies come in many different sizes and shapes and lean doesn't equal healthy, just as not lean doesn't equal unhealthy.

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Quote:
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I'm not taking this personally btw, this is just another example of how society feels the need to pressure 5 year olds into being a certain size or shape.  Completely ignoring the fact that bodies come in many different sizes and shapes and lean doesn't equal healthy, just as not lean doesn't equal unhealthy.


...and ignoring the fact that a five year old's body is far from a constant, in any case. Their weight and shape is shifting on a regular basis when they're young.

 


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#15 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 11:56 AM
 
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This is something that really bothers me AND seems to happen often:
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by onlyzombiecat View Post

 

I entered your dd's numbers into an online kid's BMI calculator and it said 94 percentile and "at risk for being overweight".

Scrolling down the page it said "Since body mass index doesn't directly measure body fat, it is possible to be overweight but not obese. Some kids who are very athletic and have a large muscle mass, may be overweight, but if they do not have excess body fat, then they do not need help with weight loss." from http://pediatrics.about.com/cs/usefultools/l/bl_bmi_results.htm?test=1&gender=2&age=5&months=0&cwt=56.8&chf=3&chi=11

/a/WeightGain.htm


 

I did the same (well, looked at the CDC growth charts) and also placed your DD's BMI of 18.1 at under the 95th%.

 

I don't take BMI too seriously with kids for a few reasons:

 

1) many kids tend to grow in real "spurts."  So they might put on 3-5 lbs very quickly and then grow an inch just as quickly.  If you happen to measure the child between putting on the weight and putting on the height the picture is totally different than it could be in just a couple weeks.

 

2) kids are notoriously hard to measure.  If the OP's DD measured just 1/2-3/4" taller, she would drop under the 90th%.  Same thing if she was like 1-2 lbs lighter.  What if she ate right before going in?  Was wearing heavier clothes?  Maybe she wasn't standing up right.  Heck, maybe the scale was off! 

 

3) Kids are not adult propoprtions.  This is especially "hard" on bigger kids.  Because their height/weight is higher people often expect them to have more adult measurements.  But a 5 year old who is the height of a 7 year old will generally be heavier because they will have larger torso for height (and torsos are just heavier than that amount of leg).

 

And so on.

 

OP: What is your "mom" sense telling you?  If you had no concerns until seeing the doctor and DD seems healthy and happy, I would letit go for another while at least.

 


 

 

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#16 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 12:07 PM
 
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I don't really know what to say.  Maybe I didn't phrase it the best but the OP did ask for opinions.  She doesn't look obese to me but with all the weight problems in this country nowadays I think people don't see it when a child is borderline overweight.  They are used to seeing so many heavy kids that one borderline looks perfect.  And average kids get told they don't eat enough because they look too thin compared to their peers.  If this post was supposed to only be for reassurance then I do apologize.  If the OP posted about an underweight child and posted a pic of child who looked a little too thin, I would have been honest then too (and I'm fairly sure that would have been perfectly acceptable given that the weight issue often only goes one way).  I think the OP needs to look at different angles, which is what I tried to convey in my first post.  Somehow it got misconstrued in that I'm just judgmental of fat people, end of story.  I'm not.  I used to be heavy myself and goodness know I have problems with overeating.  I tend to speak very frankly about weight and sometimes forget that it's a super touchy subject for most people.  I don't expect all kids to be exactly the same size but all too often I hear parents brushing off concerns.  I applaud the OP for considering that something might be off.  If she looks at everything, decides her DD is fine, then that's great.

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#17 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 12:08 PM
 
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Your daughter is beautiful.  

 

Perhaps the doctor miscalculated the BMI?

 

And...it's important to remember that the BMI doesn't work well for folks who are athletic--muscle weighs more than fat does.  Thus, a person with a muscular build will have a higher BMI than someone without those muscles.


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#18 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 12:36 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TiredX2 View Post


This is something that really bothers me AND seems to happen often:
 


 

I did the same (well, looked at the CDC growth charts) and also placed your DD's BMI of 18.1 at under the 95th%.

 

I don't take BMI too seriously with kids for a few reasons:

 

1) many kids tend to grow in real "spurts."  So they might put on 3-5 lbs very quickly and then grow an inch just as quickly.  If you happen to measure the child between putting on the weight and putting on the height the picture is totally different than it could be in just a couple weeks.

 

2) kids are notoriously hard to measure.  If the OP's DD measured just 1/2-3/4" taller, she would drop under the 90th%.  Same thing if she was like 1-2 lbs lighter.  What if she ate right before going in?  Was wearing heavier clothes?  Maybe she wasn't standing up right.  Heck, maybe the scale was off! 

 

3) Kids are not adult propoprtions.  This is especially "hard" on bigger kids.  Because their height/weight is higher people often expect them to have more adult measurements.  But a 5 year old who is the height of a 7 year old will generally be heavier because they will have larger torso for height (and torsos are just heavier than that amount of leg).

 

And so on.

 

OP: What is your "mom" sense telling you? If you had no concerns until seeing the doctor and DD seems healthy and happy, I would letit go for another while at least.

[/quote]

My "mom" sense, before today, was that she was an active, muscular kid. Nothing else. I knew she weighed as much as her 7yo sister, but she's almost just as tall. I know that we joke about her being a gymnast because she has the perfect build for it (shorter but incredibly solid). She's like a rock when you hug her. I don't think I could actually pinch any skin/fat on her body. Every inch of her is just...solid. I keep coming back to that word, but it fits perfectly. Aside from that, I know she eats great and even though she may eat more than most kids her age, she is eating the right things.
Quote:
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Your daughter is beautiful.  

 

Perhaps the doctor miscalculated the BMI?

 

And...it's important to remember that the BMI doesn't work well for folks who are athletic--muscle weighs more than fat does.  Thus, a person with a muscular build will have a higher BMI than someone without those muscles.


Thank you. This is something I asked the ped about. I said, "feel her - she's all muscle". Her response is that her build hides it well. The more I think about that comment, the more it upsets me. You're right. Muscle does weigh more than fat; I don't understand why that isn't being taken into consideration?



Thanks for everyone's responses so far. I feel somewhat validated now...I think this whole thing is an overreaction.
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#19 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 12:37 PM
 
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Originally Posted by bandgeek View Post

I don't really know what to say.  Maybe I didn't phrase it the best but the OP did ask for opinions.  She doesn't look obese to me but with all the weight problems in this country nowadays I think people don't see it when a child is borderline overweight.  They are used to seeing so many heavy kids that one borderline looks perfect. 

 

I'm not in the US, and we have the weight problems, but not to the same extent. I know what heavy kids look like (ds2 looks heavy). OP's dd does NOT look heavy.

 

And average kids get told they don't eat enough because they look too thin compared to their peers. 


I'll have to take your word for this. I've only ever seen someone try to push a child to eat due to being "too skinny" a handful of times. I think it was completely out of line in all cases, but they were also all really, really thin kids (the "all bone" physique).

 

If this post was supposed to only be for reassurance then I do apologize. 

 

I think there's a lot of room between "only for reassurance" and the phrasing you used. Without the "necessarily", it wouldn't have bothered me as much, but even your first sentence was kind of...off.

 

If the OP posted about an underweight child and posted a pic of child who looked a little too thin, I would have been honest then too (and I'm fairly sure that would have been perfectly acceptable given that the weight issue often only goes one way). 

 

If you had replied using the same phrasing, but with the opposite words (as in my above example), it would have bugged me, too. To me, this isn't about a "weight issue", though. It's about the level of paranoia we're developing over the weight of very young children. Children are growing so fast, and often so unevenly, that talking about blood tests and a nutritionist after one visit is overkill, unless we're talking about a child who is suffering obvious ill effects (eg. a couple I know who literally can't run a half block). If teh ped is concerned, I could maybe see scheduling a follow-up in 3-6 months, to see if she's at the same BMI, or has had a growth spurt, or whatever. But, beginning to intervene, without establishing that there really is an issue is overkill and counter-productive, imo. We don't have the same kind of pressure to "fatten em up" with thin kids, so I don't think you'd see the same reaction from a ped, unless the child was showing other signs of issues. And, I think the medical profession puts waaayyy too much emphasis on height, weight and BMI in children.

 

I think the OP needs to look at different angles, which is what I tried to convey in my first post.  Somehow it got misconstrued in that I'm just judgmental of fat people, end of story.  I'm not.  I used to be heavy myself and goodness know I have problems with overeating.  I tend to speak very frankly about weight and sometimes forget that it's a super touchy subject for most people.  I don't expect all kids to be exactly the same size but all too often I hear parents brushing off concerns.  I applaud the OP for considering that something might be off.  If she looks at everything, decides her DD is fine, then that's great.

 

Fair enough. Personally, having looked at the pictures, I have no idea what "everything" she should look at, but that's life. I can say that I absolutely wouldn't subject my child to blood tests over a BMI that the doctor seems to have calculated incorrectly in the first place (the ped said 97th percentile. Two posters here got 94% and 95% and I checked a calculator, as well, and got 94%). Before a doctor convinces me to subject my child to blood tests, they're going to have to give me a better reason than the asinine BMI.



 


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#20 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 12:38 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by TiredX2 View Post


This is something that really bothers me AND seems to happen often:
 


 

I did the same (well, looked at the CDC growth charts) and also placed your DD's BMI of 18.1 at under the 95th%.

 

I don't take BMI too seriously with kids for a few reasons:

 

1) many kids tend to grow in real "spurts."  So they might put on 3-5 lbs very quickly and then grow an inch just as quickly.  If you happen to measure the child between putting on the weight and putting on the height the picture is totally different than it could be in just a couple weeks.

 

2) kids are notoriously hard to measure.  If the OP's DD measured just 1/2-3/4" taller, she would drop under the 90th%.  Same thing if she was like 1-2 lbs lighter.  What if she ate right before going in?  Was wearing heavier clothes?  Maybe she wasn't standing up right.  Heck, maybe the scale was off! 

 

3) Kids are not adult propoprtions.  This is especially "hard" on bigger kids.  Because their height/weight is higher people often expect them to have more adult measurements.  But a 5 year old who is the height of a 7 year old will generally be heavier because they will have larger torso for height (and torsos are just heavier than that amount of leg).

 

And so on.

 

OP: What is your "mom" sense telling you? If you had no concerns until seeing the doctor and DD seems healthy and happy, I would letit go for another while at least.

[/quote]

My "mom" sense, before today, was that she was an active, muscular kid. Nothing else. I knew she weighed as much as her 7yo sister, but she's almost just as tall. I know that we joke about her being a gymnast because she has the perfect build for it (shorter but incredibly solid). She's like a rock when you hug her. I don't think I could actually pinch any skin/fat on her body. Every inch of her is just...solid. I keep coming back to that word, but it fits perfectly. Aside from that, I know she eats great and even though she may eat more than most kids her age, she is eating the right things.
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Originally Posted by wishin'&hopin' View Post

Your daughter is beautiful.  

 

Perhaps the doctor miscalculated the BMI?

 

And...it's important to remember that the BMI doesn't work well for folks who are athletic--muscle weighs more than fat does.  Thus, a person with a muscular build will have a higher BMI than someone without those muscles.


Thank you. This is something I asked the ped about. I said, "feel her - she's all muscle". Her response is that her build hides it well. The more I think about that comment, the more it upsets me. You're right. Muscle does weigh more than fat; I don't understand why that isn't being taken into consideration?



Thanks for everyone's responses so far. I feel somewhat validated now...I think this whole thing is an overreaction.
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#21 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 12:41 PM
 
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OP, you said:

 

 

Quote:
You're right. Muscle does weigh more than fat; I don't understand why that isn't being taken into consideration?

 

It's not being taken into consideration, because BMI is a number. While most places that explain it (articles, calculators, brochures, etc.) do include a comment about it not working as well for muscular individuals or those with a big frame or whatever (the mom of the overweight kids that I was talking about above has a shoulder span that's about equal that of several men I know, and those men are also over six feet tall - the woman is about 5'6"), that's overlooked when people are just using the number itself. Your dd's BMI is in a high percentile, and that's that...even though it's not.

 

I hate, hate, hate the BMI. There are no words for how harmful I believe it to be.


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#22 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 12:43 PM
 
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My dd is in the 94th percentile on BMI like your dd (my online calculator said 94th, not 97th) -- "at risk of being overweight". She's in the 94th percentile for weight and the 84th for height.

 

The thing is, that dd has had these SAME percentages since she was an infant. Her doctor (who isn't holistic at all, but very practical, and I love her), said "well, this has been her growth curve all her life. If we see the weight and the height percentiles starting to diverge, then we need to be a little concerned." Honestly, dd came out built like a linebacker. She was OVER the 97th percentile at birth, and about the 95th for height at birth. She's got beautiful broad shoulders and a lovely little hour glass figure (from her dad's side of the family). The women in my family are chesty with broad shoulders. As one of my friends put it, "She really does look like German peasant farmer, doesn't she?" She's strong as an ox and has a fair amount of muscle and a little fat. She's never going to be a size 0 or a size 2. It's not in her genes. When she's grown and at a healthy weight, she'll be a size 10 or 12. (That's what my mom and my sisters who are at a healthy weight are.)

 

Dd is 4' 3 1/2" tall, and weighs 73 pounds. Her brother is 4' 10 1/2" tall and weighs 72 lbs. He's always at risk of being underweight. The thing is, if you look at their diets, dd's is probably more healthy than ds'. For her snacks, she chooses yogurt (low fat), turkey, ham, and fruit). She gravitates toward protein. Ds's pants stay up, as far as I can tell, because of the copious amounts of Nutella that he eats. He is much more likely to tend toward carbs. He stays lean because he moves constantly.

 

Dd is, probably, at risk for being overweight, but that's largely because she's more sedentary, and has decided that she doesn't want to do any sports where she has to "run and get hot". So, we've enrolled her in swimming. We're reducing the amount of TV she watches (it got a bit excessive at the end of the summer because I was ill). But her favorite things are to read and play imaginary play with stuffed animals (where she does things like do homework with her stuffed animals!). Her brother's favorite things are basketball and soccer. Even in the living room, he does soccer kicks with a balloon. Dd reads.

 

I think your doctor is concerned because her weight jumped up fairly high in the last year, but her height hasn't. But all that says to me is: Watch out for the growth spurt! If she's fairly active, can do what she wants without getting winded, and you think her diet is well balanced, I'd relax.


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#23 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 12:51 PM
 
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Originally Posted by mamatoablessing View Post



Thank you. This is something I asked the ped about. I said, "feel her - she's all muscle". Her response is that her build hides it well. The more I think about that comment, the more it upsets me. You're right. Muscle does weigh more than fat; I don't understand why that isn't being taken into consideration?
 


 

If you want to look intothis in the future, they can take it into account by taking a body fat measurement.  My BIL was "overweight" for the Army, but they just sent him to a doctor.  The doctor said he had a 3% body fat and was just super muscular.  He'll never be a "healthy weight" but that doesn't mean he's unhealthy.

 

 


 

 


 

 

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#24 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 01:14 PM
 
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She looks healthy to me.  She is almost as tall as my 8 1/2 year old and weighs a few pounds more, but he is built like a bird.  I plugged both my kids into a BMI calculator and he is in the 24th percentile where my DD6 is in the 95th (42" and 48 pounds).  She also looks healthy.

 

I am going to choose not to worry on this one.  I think you know your child better than her doctor does, but it would be irresponsible for the doc not to bring it up. 

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#25 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 01:23 PM
 
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Kids often have growth spurts around their birthdays, and then again about six months later. It is normal to put on a little weight first, and then hit a growth spurt and gain an inch or two. That growth spurt completely changes the growth chart percentiles. As mentioned above, I do see a little tummy in one picture, but she does NOT look like she's overweight. She looks like a normal, healthy five year old. Teaching her about healthy foods, and seeing her regulate her intake based on hunger is a great thing. I don't think you have anything to worry about.

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#26 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 01:33 PM
 
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I did read your whole post.  And it's full of judgment.  Your very first sentence was "she's not fat, but she's not lean".  The op's daughter is a perfectly healthy size, she's active, she has a good diet.  And you brush all that aside with that one phrase like there's a problem with the fact that she isn't "lean".  


Well I could say the same thing-- she's not fat but she's not lean.  She looks like she's right on the edge in terms of healthy weight, and given that there has been a big jump over one year, I would be concerned too as a mom and a pediatrician.  If my 5 y.o. DD were that size I be a bit concerned and keep an eye on things shrug.gif .  The OP says she eats big portion sizes and a small amount of "bad" stuff.  No harm in cutting out all bad stuff, even if it's minimal to begin with, and maybe keeping track of portion sizes (without making it obvious to DD) for a while just to get a clearer idea exactly how much she is eating.  If she's eating within a reasonable intake level, it's probably just how she's built.  But it can be easy to underestimate how much food one eats.

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#27 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 01:44 PM
 
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I think the child looks lovely and vibrant and healthy.

 

There are names for different body types:  mesomorph, endomorph, ectomorph.  We are all built differently and one person's "ideal" weight for their height may be quite different from another's.

 

 

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#28 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 01:45 PM
 
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Well I could say the same thing-- she's not fat but she's not lean.  She looks like she's right on the edge in terms of healthy weight, and given that there has been a big jump over one year, I would be concerned too as a mom and a pediatrician.  If my 5 y.o. DD were that size I be a bit concerned and keep an eye on things shrug.gif .  The OP says she eats big portion sizes and a small amount of "bad" stuff.  No harm in cutting out all bad stuff, even if it's minimal to begin with, and maybe keeping track of portion sizes (without making it obvious to DD) for a while just to get a clearer idea exactly how much she is eating.  If she's eating within a reasonable intake level, it's probably just how she's built.  But it can be easy to underestimate how much food one eats.


My 5 year old is that size and there is no way in the world I will track portion sizes or cut out everything unhealthy.   I do think there's harm in cutting out everything that might be considered a treat.  And as a mom, I'm not concerned.  My son's doctor is not concerned.  I'm really surprised that there are people who think the op's daughter is on any edge of healthy weight. 

 

 There are enough girls in this country with eating issues, why add another one because of 1 comment made by a doctor?  Sure, if she keeps jumping off the charts, look into it, but because one time her curve went up?  No way.
 

Edited to change "anything" to "everything."

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My 5 year old is that size and there is no way in the world I will track portion sizes or cut out anything unhealthy.   I do think there's harm in cutting out everything that might be considered a treat.  And as a mom, I'm not concerned.  My son's doctor is not concerned.  I'm really surprised that there are people who think the op's daughter is on any edge of healthy weight. 

 

 There are enough girls in this country with eating issues, why add another one because of 1 comment made by a doctor?  Sure, if she keeps jumping off the charts, look into it, but because one time her curve went up?  No way.
 

 


I would agree that have to be careful about limiting food or even mentioning weight to a child. I feel that encouraging a healthy diet as a family, and healthy physical activity is much better than even mentioning weight or cutting out the occasional treat.

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#30 of 99 Old 09-27-2011, 02:05 PM
 
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Peds are crazy about this issue lately. My 2-year-old dd looks average to thin, but because she's 85th percentile for weight, her ped told me she's overweight. Nevermind she's 95th-100th for height! They don't even use logic when looking at these numbers anymore. I see the photo, she doesn't look thin but she certainly doesn't look at all obese either. I wouldn't worry about it.
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