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#1 of 37 Old 10-06-2011, 01:02 PM - Thread Starter
 
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DS is at an age where we are making decisions about „organized“ hobbies as it were, ie deciding whether to enrol him in a sport here, a music class there, and generally trying to find out what will make him happy in life.

Of course, the primary principle would be enrol him in whatever he enjoys and shows some natural talent for, and I wouldn’t want to enrol him in anything he didn’t like just because I think he should be doing it (with the exception of swim class) because what would be the point, he’d just refuse to take part. And of course, there are access, finances, friends and family to consider – meaning that if the whole family likes to hang out with friends on the golf course whenever (not us), golf it’s gonna be, and while we can reach the mountains fairly quickly, beach sports are out. And so on.

But there are other considerations I am mulling over so if, like me, you enjoy obsessing about this kind of thing, please tell me your thoughts!

I think that, among other things, a hobby should be, if possible, transportable, sustainable, conducive to community and to health, so that’s where I’d want to nudge him toward.

By transportable I mean a hobby like choir singing – I moved around so much, including across the Atlantic and back, but the one constant was I always find a choir to sing in, and my voice was always at hand. A violin is so much easier to transport than a tuba or a harp, and while there are some instruments there are always very few positions for, there is usually room somewhere in the back of the second violins even for a mediocre player like me. While a piano is hard to take on a plane, there is usually one around and it’s a great transferable skill. And all of this is stuff you can do until you’re old, so it’s sustainable, too.

It’s not so easy to find a sport you can do until you’re old, though I think swimming actually fits the bill – I told DS swim class is non-negotiable for safety reasons, and once he’s done I want to enrol him in a swim team. I think it’s healthy and helps with his sensory issues, and so far he is enjoying it - it’s not a team sport like soccer or basketball, which I know he’d hate. While the community aspect of soccer is big in Europe – every able-bodied European male is expected to be able to kick a ball around without embarassing himself, for instance at a corporate retreat – I expect school to shove it down his throat anyway. I’d also like him to get outdoors a lot, so I am hoping to enrol him in rowing or canoing later (we live on a river), another sport for a solitary little soul who likes the water. Skiing is a wonderful outdoors activity for winter when river sports take a break and is something we can do as a family, and so is hiking in summer. Another hobby that is really useful I think is a martial art for self-defense, so I am thinking of maybe enrolling him in karate or something similar at some point.

I also think that just like DH, he’ll enjoy doing things with his hands, learning proper drawing, woodshop. That kind of thing. But DH is a great teacher and I think at his age, there won’t be a class where they actually teach anything as opposed to just encourage creativity, which he can exercise at home with crayons and lego. If he wants proper teaching, we can find real art or woodwork classes for him when he’s older.

So right now it’s swim class, violin lessons, a foreign language class offered through pre-school, and lots and lots of drawing and playdo and building stuff in the sandbox.

And I hope he won’t develop an all-consuming passion for figure-skating.

 

What else would you recommend as a really useful (in the transportable, sustainable, conducive to community and to health –sense) hobby for a child to pick up?


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#2 of 37 Old 10-06-2011, 01:55 PM
 
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My son is 8 now, but started karate a couple of years ago and it has been so great for him.  If a kid gets into it I think it's such a great confidence builder and I love it that he enjoys his relationship with his sensei (sp?) and he is always working towards something that he's excited about.  I don't know how it would have been for him to start at five, but a lot of kids do start that young or younger.  I found out that one of the girls on the performance team from his dojo is only 8 1/2 and she's a black belt and so amazing to watch.  

 

I don't know if they do this at most or all karate dojos, but at Milo's they do "public speaking" at almost every class and talk a lot about how to treat each other and other people, and how to stand up for themselves verbally so they don't have to use their skills.  So, I think he's becoming more confident in a lot of respects through karate.  So, that would be my rec!


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#3 of 37 Old 10-06-2011, 03:42 PM
 
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organised art with an artist. 

 

i see how it has transformed kids at school. not just access to art supplies but being taught the fundamentals of drawing and sculpture and ceramics. 

 

i remember starting in K and i still use it even today. art was the one place critical thinking was introduced by my teacher. why take things at face value. so what if the bluejay is blue adn grey. make it any colour you want. i am not sure i am a better artist, but i am a way out of the box thinker. and i definitely feel it was art class that helped me with it.

 

though however i would give credit to my awesome teacher who used the form of art to teach us critical thinking. 

 

you will be surprised at what a great art program has to offer. the one dd went to (it was at her dc, ps) dd's favourite activity was when it was time for slide painting. they covered the slide with paper and then took different balls, covered them with paint and watched the effect of them on paper. big ball, small ball, heavy ball, light ball, smooth ball, textured ball, how you threw it ... etc.

 

dd is a what if child (which actually many find v. frustrating). those activities at dc is what i feel encouraged that side of dd. 

 

however i would also say look at your neighbors and people around you. you dont HAVE TO enroll him in an outdoor activity for him to learn. find passionate people around you and see if are willing to have dd over. at 2 dd's knowledge about gardening was far superior to mine coz she helped our neighbor with her garden. because of a friend of ours dd is now into rock climbing and high altitude serious hiking (i dont go because they mostly scramble up scree sloped on their hands and knees). 

 

hanging out with cool people is even more important than classes. 


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#4 of 37 Old 10-06-2011, 05:36 PM
 
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This isn't the kind of thing kids usually take classes in, but my candidate for best ever hobby would be nature study.  In particular, I think it's useful to be introduced to the joy of hunting for things.  That could mean birding and keeping a life list, hunting for edible mushrooms, fossils, shed antlers, fox dens, butterflies, or rare plants, or hunting/fishing for food.  (For the littlest  kids, it can be hunting for frogs along a pond edge, or finding pretty rocks on the hiking trail.)  It seems to be something people just naturally find rewarding, so it can be an endless source of entertainment.  And whatever you're hunting, you can hardly help but learn something from it.  I think everyone should learn as much as possible about the natural world.

 

Of course there are lots of other ways to enjoy and learn about nature, and I enthusiastically recommend them all.  It's great to just wander around with no goal in mind, seeing what you can see; it's great to get field guides and learn to identify everything; it's great to closely observe animal behavior.  But having something to hunt for is especially fun and motivating.  (Shopping is fun in exactly the same way, but probably not as healthy.) 

 

My 8 year old loves hunting for caterpillars, and I love to see her out there turning over leaves and beating trees.  Maybe she won't always be this interested in caterpillars, but I bet she'll always be interested in hunting for something or other, and her life will be better for it.

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#5 of 37 Old 10-06-2011, 11:59 PM
 
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I'd like my kids to be able to do some crafts. I want them to be able to do basic sewing eg sew in a button, turn up trousers and so on. DD is also leaning to knit. We're not looking for classes in either at the moment but our local craft shop run workshops sometimes and we might look at those when she is a little more confident.

 

 

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#6 of 37 Old 10-07-2011, 03:31 AM
 
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How about photography? He'd need a decent camera, but that doesn't cost more than a violin or sports equipment or whatever. Photography gets kids outdoors (that's where the good light is!), gets them observing and looking at things in a new way, and can teach them about technology too if they go the Photoshop route. Plus it's a hugely marketable skill later in life. If he got good, he could always pick up some money on weekends shooting bar mitzvahs and engagement photos and family photos - if he got really good, weddings. Or of course there are the "proper" career opportunities, photojournalism or whatnot; or selling stock photos. I do freelance writing and a lot of magazines want stories with photos attached. And even if he never used the  hobby for money, he could take great shots of his kids one day, and/or get a lot of joy just through the creative process.

 

I say this as someone who truly sucks at photography. I have an actual anti-talent for it. Lots of people do. Hence, people who can do it are always in high demand, social currency-wise. :p Also, it's a portable and (after the initial outlay, as long as he doesn't go mad over fancy lenses and stuff) cheap hobby. It can be done in solitude, but there's a big social aspect to it as well, especially online. And there are plenty of volunteer/charity opportunities for him to use his talent for the good of the world.

 

Hmm, what else? Cooking! INCREDIBLY useful. If he learns to bake, he'll never lack friends. :p Tinkering with computers, if he has that sort of mind, is also great social currency and could lead to a job - it tends to be introverted and indoorsy though, so it might not be what you're after?  What about learning to make machines go? Like a junior mechanics' club, if such a thing exists?

 

The question you really need to ask yourself is "Would this skill help my son survive a zombie apocalypse?". If it would, it's a worthy hobby.


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#7 of 37 Old 10-07-2011, 06:52 AM
 
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Re: Figure skating - we have friends with a child who developed a passion for figure skating when he was 12 or so. On one level, they regret that they didn't start him earlier, since he's quite talented, but will never reach the competitive skill of the kids who started when they were pre-schoolers. On another level, they are happy that they've missed the pressure cooker. It still consumes him (and their bank account - I goggle at the cost of skates and costumes, even for a modest rec-level competitive stream) but without the pressures of developing an Olympic level athlete. Skating is a great life-long sport, and since you are considering skiing, arenas are often easier to access than ski hills and the skating season tends to last a little longer - there are even summer skate programs, if you live in an area where skating is popular. 

 

Dance is also wonderful. Studios often offer incentives for boys like half-price classes and they are usually assured of good roles in productions, because limited numbers of boys enrol. It can be a terrific life-long activity and there are so many different dance styles that there is something for everyone.  

 

Drama, puppetry, are a lot of fun and since they involve production, there's an opportunity to get involved in carpentry, construction, painting, sewing, etc. for the staging, scenery, and costumes. 

 

I would try a few different activities and find those that excite and inspire him.  

 

  

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#8 of 37 Old 10-07-2011, 07:04 AM
 
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I may be a little biased here but I say MUSIC!!!  Learning music is good for the brain!  ;)  It's an amazing social activity, whether it be organized (playing in an orchestra or singing in a choir), or casual (jamming at a party).  It crosses all the language barriers.  Learning to play an instrument requires dedication and hard work (thus teaching how to work hard), but it's FUN too (esp if you have the right teacher) which is motivating for kids.


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#9 of 37 Old 10-07-2011, 08:05 AM
 
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Horseback riding or anything nature related. treehugger.gif DD loves the horses, donkey, dogs, cats, and all the other creatures at the barn. This week they had a lamb. It's our weekly relaxation. Keeps everything in perspective.

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#10 of 37 Old 10-07-2011, 08:12 AM
 
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Outdoor leadership programs, community gardening, "transportable" sports (besides swimming, how about running biking and hiking.  And I know people in their 90's in these activities, you can keep them up), anything involving volunteering with others, music, art, kid's book clubs... there's lots out there.  And I don't think it always has to be an official "kids'' program.  I really love including our children in the activities we do with community.  Also, consider starting up a club if you are passionate about something!


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#11 of 37 Old 10-09-2011, 01:57 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Wow, so much interest! Thank you so much for your suggestions.

 

Quote:
My son is 8 now, but started karate a couple of years ago and it has been so great for him.  

 

 

I am glad to hear that karate is so recommended. I won't start him now - he's still got problems with emotional regulation and has occasional violent explosions and i need to be able to restrain him to protect himself and others, I shudder at what a child with marital arts training could do to me...but he is making great strides and I am sure in a few years it might be just the right thing for him (no, I don't expect him to learn better self-regulation with karate *now*, it's a developmental thing...), I have already bookmarked a place that offers parent-and-child tae kwon do classes in the area we shall be moving into in a few years, and wil research more about karate options. I hear it's good for kids with sensory issues and hypotonia, too.

 

Quote:

i see how it has transformed kids at school. not just access to art supplies but being taught the fundamentals of drawing and sculpture and ceramics. 

 

 

Yes, that's what I meant  - the classes for preschoolers/kindergartners I have found so far are all about access and "just be creative" - there seems to be a somewhat "therapeutic" approach to it, iykwim, and the desprptions sound all over the place - they listen to stories and music and dance and play and sort of create art in between as well, all tied in to a "theme". That would drive my kindergartner nuts, he wants to *learn*. I'd want the fundamentals taught. I''ll keep my eyes open for classes taught by a real artist - I had atrocious art teachers in school and often hated the subject, whereas my DH's teacher was an artist in his own right, plus fine arts degree and teacher training and he thrived.

 

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 In particular, I think it's useful to be introduced to the joy of hunting for things.  That could mean birding and keeping a life list, hunting for edible mushrooms, fossils, shed antlers, fox dens, butterflies, or rare plants, or hunting/fishing for food.  (For the littlest  kids, it can be hunting for frogs along a pond edge, or finding pretty rocks on the hiking trail.)  It seems to be something people just naturally find rewarding, so it can be an endless source of entertainment.  And whatever you're hunting, you can hardly help but learn something from it.  I think everyone should learn as much as possible about the natural world.

That's a GREAT suggestion. While I like to be outdoors, I usually get bored if I don't have a proper goal (like bike to the lake and go for a swim or hike up a mountain, have lunch at the lodge and take the cable car down) and don't really know what to do. So would DS who would whine constantly "but what do we have to go into the woods FOR?" if we could all just stay in and play lego. He loves hunting for rocks when we're hiking. So I'll think of more stuff like that. Awesome. thumb.gif

 

Quote:
I'd like my kids to be able to do some crafts. I want them to be able to do basic sewing eg sew in a button, turn up trousers and so on. DD is also leaning to knit.

 

Luckily, that's something the schools will take care of. This culture is big on knitting and sewing, even for boys.

 

Quote:
How about photography? He'd need a decent camera, but that doesn't cost more than a violin or sports equipment or whatever. Photography gets kids outdoors (that's where the good light is!), gets them observing and looking at things in a new way, and can teach them about technology too if they go the Photoshop route. Plus it's a hugely marketable skill later in life.

My DH is a published photographer. i'll leave facilitating that one up to him. love.gif

 

Quote:
Hmm, what else? Cooking! INCREDIBLY useful. If he learns to bake, he'll never lack friends

I love involving him in baking. He also bakes a lot with MIL. Funny I never thought of it as a hobby, just a life skill. Come to think of it, it is a real hobby for my brother, he always buys himself more cookbooks, loves to go to farmers markets, try out unusual dishes, buy really expensive knives. Cooking as opposed to baking still sounds a little dangerous to me (more access to hot and sharp stuff) but I actually want him to be able to cook proper meals for himself by the time he's a teenager, be more confident than me in that respect (though my mother let me bake, she never properly involved me in cooking, i think that being a homemaker she thought of it as her work to do, not involve her kids inshrug.gif, my brother learned from my grandfather and I decided to take a proper class when I moved out after high school).

 

 

Quote:

Skating is a great life-long sport, and since you are considering skiing, arenas are often easier to access than ski hills and the skating season tends to last a little longer - there are even summer skate programs, if you live in an area where skating is popular. 

Didn't mean to bash figure skating - just occurred to me as a sport that is all about competing when you're young but you can't do triple toe-loops when you're sixty. I think. I'm sure recreational skating can go on forever. I was in gymnastics which was great as a teenager but suddenly with growing up I got scared of turning backflips and couldn't learn new things any more and that was it for that sport. Not something you can keep up or restart as a middle-aged somewhat overweight mother of two. However, i am still skiing and want my kids to ski with me!

orngbiggrin.gif

 

Quote:

Drama, puppetry, are a lot of fun and since they involve production, there's an opportunity to get involved in carpentry, construction, painting, sewing, etc. for the staging, scenery, and costumes. 

 

 

Interesting suggestion, particularly the puppetry. DH keeps talking about getting out his old puppet theatre he used to do shows for his younger siblings with. Maybe another one I'd leave up to him to facilitate. I've never seen a class or club for this.

 

 

Quote:

I may be a little biased here but I say MUSIC!!!  Learning music is good for the brain!  ;)  It's an amazing social activity, whether it be organized (playing in an orchestra or singing in a choir), or casual (jamming at a party).  It crosses all the language barriers.  Learning to play an instrument requires dedication and hard work (thus teaching how to work hard), but it's FUN too (esp if you have the right teacher) which is motivating for kids.

 

He's doing really well with violin so far! We're holding out on choir for now, the local option isn't great and he's too young to go for the city options (there is an excellent childrens choir that's won all sorts of awards and a catholic boys choir with a good reputation.)

 

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Horseback riding or anything nature related. treehugger.gif DD loves the horses, donkey, dogs, cats, and all the other creatures at the barn. This week they had a lamb. It's our weekly relaxation. Keeps everything in perspective.
 

Horseback riding is at athe back of my mind, too. Great for sensory issues i hear. I haven't heard of good options locally though, I'll save that for later when he could negotiate his own transport.

 

Quote:
Outdoor leadership programs, community gardening, "transportable" sports (besides swimming, how about running biking and hiking. 

 

We've enjoyed hiking and camping so much this summer. we want to do more of it as a family. We all hate running so that's for him to pick up on his own but we bike as a family - just bought myself a new bike after 15 years of riding whatever wasn't broken because we want to do more of that as well. thinking about #3 though which might mkae things hard for a while, but we really wnat to keep  on the ball now.

 

Great foos for thought, everyone. Thanks again!

 


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#12 of 37 Old 10-09-2011, 02:37 PM
 
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Funny I never thought of it as a hobby, just a life skill. Come to think of it, it is a real hobby for my brother, he always buys himself more cookbooks, loves to go to farmers markets, try out unusual dishes, buy really expensive knives.

Oh, totally! It's been a hobby of mine since I was a kid. I'd get out baking books from the library and try new stuff. Now I read cooking blogs. We're going on a mini-holiday this week, and I've planned it all around visiting artisan salami-makers and cheese-makers and farmers' markets! And going to restaurants, of course. :p Cooking got me into gardening, too, so I could have fresh herbs and basil; and in the past I've had various mini-businesses doing wedding cakes, selling Christmas truffles, making meals for busy mothers and so on.

 

Also, when he gets old enough for the good choirs, that's an awesome hobby. I couldn't leave DD to go to choir practice when she was a baby, so I made my own singing group with friends. There are only six of us and we're kinda rubbish, but we have fun... and once we made someone's mother cry singing Christmas carols, so that was awesome. :p Good for discipline, breath control, reading music, socialising, all sorts of stuff.


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#13 of 37 Old 10-09-2011, 04:57 PM
 
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How about geocaching?


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#14 of 37 Old 10-23-2011, 11:10 PM
 
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I'd like to add a vote for traditional Taekwondo (or another traditional martial art). Note the emphasis on *traditional*. The behavioral and psycho-social improvements seen with traditional martial arts training are not seen in schools that treat a martial art as a mere sport. See my article, "Why Taekwondo?," for more details and for the research: http://lifespantkd.blogspot.com/

 

Also, I'd be very surprised to see a young child use a Taekwondo skill during a tantrum. During extreme emotional distress, we generally fall back on things that we know really well. It takes years of practice for a Taekwondo (or other martial art) skill to become automatic. And, in a traditional school, there is much emphasis on what these skills are for and what they are not for.

 

Cynthia

 

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#15 of 37 Old 10-24-2011, 12:07 AM
 
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Quote:

Originally Posted by Tigerle View Post

Wow, so much interest! Thank you so much for your suggestions.

 

 

 

I am glad to hear that karate is so recommended. I won't start him now - he's still got problems with emotional regulation and has occasional violent explosions and i need to be able to restrain him to protect himself and others, I shudder at what a child with marital arts training could do to me...but he is making great strides and I am sure in a few years it might be just the right thing for him (no, I don't expect him to learn better self-regulation with karate *now*, it's a developmental thing...), I have already bookmarked a place that offers parent-and-child tae kwon do classes in the area we shall be moving into in a few years, and wil research more about karate options. I hear it's good for kids with sensory issues and hypotonia, too.

 

Actually Taekwondoe might be good for his emotional regulation. one of the things that the good teachers stress is self-regulation. I know a lot of parents of 'quirky' kids who enrolled them in martial arts (traditionally taught) and have seen good success. The classes usually stress over and over that these skills can't be used outside of class.

 

I'd be careful not to overload too many things. My quirky introvert can handle one outside activity (usually a sport). Even my less quirky more extroverted child balks at more than 2 (and she's currently enrolled in 3: swim, piano and children's choir).

 

I'd focus on things you can do as a family right now and see where his interests take him. You'd be amazed at how you can find an community that likes different things in many places. Dh joined a juggling club in Germany. If he's interested in legos, there might be some really cool lego robotics classes for him to take. And yes, that can be a lifetime hobby

 

 


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#16 of 37 Old 10-24-2011, 10:38 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pianojazzgirl View Post

I may be a little biased here but I say MUSIC!!!  Learning music is good for the brain!  ;)  It's an amazing social activity, whether it be organized (playing in an orchestra or singing in a choir), or casual (jamming at a party).  It crosses all the language barriers.  Learning to play an instrument requires dedication and hard work (thus teaching how to work hard), but it's FUN too (esp if you have the right teacher) which is motivating for kids.


I second that!  It is something, too, that you can carry over until your adult life.  I also understand that music education provides a good avenue to develop in other areas such as spatial intelligence, reasoning and language processing.  Plus it's fun, especially the better you get at it and the longer you are at it.
 

 


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#17 of 37 Old 10-24-2011, 01:13 PM
 
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My son does ballet. He is in a pre professional ballet school and in the schools Dance company (they are hired to perform shows and community events).

 

I love it, he loves it. Its been such a blessing for us bc we have a very close dance community and it also fits the bill on beintg portable bc he can dance at any school (tho Cecchetti schools are perferred). He can go to a residential program, or go away for summer intensives. He could compete (we dont compete, not our style. But he could),

 

Right now his plan is to audition for a summer intensive at a residential ballet school. Then audition for the residential programs and continue doing the ballet exams until he is ceritified to teach.

 

My DD also dances.

 

 

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#18 of 37 Old 10-24-2011, 03:06 PM
 
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Birdwatching

Magic tricks

Guitar- I think learning guitar can be useful for a casual fun setting

Harmonica- very portable

Chess or other games

Growing things- this can be done in containers if you do not have land

 

 


Kim ~mom to one awesome dd (12)

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#19 of 37 Old 10-30-2011, 01:27 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Actually Taekwondoe might be good for his emotional regulation. one of the things that the good teachers stress is self-regulation. I know a lot of parents of 'quirky' kids who enrolled them in martial arts (traditionally taught) and have seen good success. The classes usually stress over and over that these skills can't be used outside of class.

 


 

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I'd like to add a vote for traditional Taekwondo (or another traditional martial art). Note the emphasis on *traditional*. The behavioral and psycho-social improvements seen with traditional martial arts training are not seen in schools that treat a martial art as a mere sport. See my article, "Why Taekwondo?," for more details and for the research: http://lifespantkd.blogspot.com/

 

Also, I'd be very surprised to see a young child use a Taekwondo skill during a tantrum. During extreme emotional distress, we generally fall back on things that we know really well. It takes years of practice for a Taekwondo (or other martial art) skill to become automatic. And, in a traditional school, there is much emphasis on what these skills are for and what they are not for.

 

Thank you, Cynthia, that was interesting reading. I wonder how you find out whether a school is really "traditional" or just pretends to be...I'll keep that in mind.


Hmm...with an explosive kid... it's not like we don't stress what not to do during an explosion over and over and have for the last four years or so...but when they explode, all bets are off. Interesting thought that this means that he wouldn't be able to draw on his skills due to the extreme emotional distress he is in at that point - but it is a risk I am really not ready to take! After all, once he has learned his moves, there isn't really a way to go back...we are getting so much better (all of us!) at dealing with the explosions now, but there is still some physical containment necessary, at least for the first minute or so. I am sure there will be a point when I feel perfectly confident at enrolling him, but for now, it's swim class!


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#20 of 37 Old 10-30-2011, 01:30 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Oh, totally! It's been a hobby of mine since I was a kid. I'd get out baking books from the library and try new stuff. Now I read cooking blogs. We're going on a mini-holiday this week, and I've planned it all around visiting artisan salami-makers and cheese-makers and farmers' markets! And going to restaurants, of course. :p Cooking got me into gardening, too, so I could have fresh herbs and basil; and in the past I've had various mini-businesses doing wedding cakes, selling Christmas truffles, making meals for busy mothers and so on.

Come to think of it, learning how to really enjoy food is also a life skill, and one that has good health aspects, too. There is so much you're missing out on if you don't try whatever you can to enjoy the food in your life, after all you do have to spend a lot of time eating, every day...

Hope you enjoyed your vacation alot!


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#21 of 37 Old 10-30-2011, 01:44 PM - Thread Starter
 
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How about geocaching?



Another way to have a "point" to the outdoors. We're muggles, but my DH is somewhat involved with the local "scene" because his and their hobbies interesect in various ways. All very cool people, and lots of families, but somehow it really isn't our thing. We just can't work up a proper interest in it. It sounds like something that DS at least might discover one day for his own, though.


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#22 of 37 Old 10-30-2011, 01:53 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Birdwatching

Magic tricks

Guitar- I think learning guitar can be useful for a casual fun setting

Harmonica- very portable

Chess or other games

Growing things- this can be done in containers if you do not have land

 

 


ha! Guitar is a good suggestion! I have always regretted that I didn't bother to learn enough guitar for a campfire singalong, and being a violinist, it should have been easy. I feel too old now for campfires, but maybe I should start it up again to go camping with the kids, and then inspire them to get good at it.

 

I kill everything I grow. Well the cherry tree and the grass in the backyard are doing fine, and so is the redcurrant bush, but the strawberries..oh my, really not looking good. Stuff that you don't just put and let it fend for itself - it's dead. I kill all indoor plants. even those of neighbours i am asked to look after. I refuse these days. Categorically.
 

 


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#23 of 37 Old 10-30-2011, 02:17 PM - Thread Starter
 
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The question you really need to ask yourself is "Would this skill help my son survive a zombie apocalypse?". If it would, it's a worthy hobby.



Um. to be honest. It is not a question i have ever asked myself. lol.gif And i am not sure what skills exactly would be required. So what is YOUR list for this? Besides cooking, of course? orngtongue.gif

 


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#24 of 37 Old 10-30-2011, 02:37 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I'd be careful not to overload too many things. My quirky introvert can handle one outside activity (usually a sport). Even my less quirky more extroverted child balks at more than 2 (and she's currently enrolled in 3: swim, piano and children's choir).

 

I'd focus on things you can do as a family right now and see where his interests take him. You'd be amazed at how you can find an community that likes different things in many places. Dh joined a juggling club in Germany. If he's interested in legos, there might be some really cool lego robotics classes for him to take. And yes, that can be a lifetime hobby

 

 


Yeah, we have to watch out for overload already - entering into what I am beginning to think of as our "fall overload phase" that starts with his birthday and will last (did so last  year, at least) until quite a while after Christmas.

Problem is, the K pullout offerings at preschool are both in the afternoon - I am so mad about that but I alone won't change things there. So with swim class and violin lesson it's like 4 outside activities weekly! Swim class will soon be finished though (as soon as he consents to put his head under water to dive for the ring he can take his test - he is actually swimming very well already!) and we will take a break on that one until after Christmas. However, of you do want them to learn music and they should have at least one athletic activity, for health reasons if none other -  how do you ever do *less* than two activities a week? It's not like you can easily take long breaks in one or the other, it'd take all the point out of the activity if you don't ever make adequate progress but keep sliding back...
 

 


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#25 of 37 Old 10-31-2011, 12:15 AM
 
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Um. to be honest. It is not a question i have ever asked myself. lol.gif And i am not sure what skills exactly would be required. So what is YOUR list for this? Besides cooking, of course? orngtongue.gif

Well, parkour, obviously; motorbiking, artillery training, possibly some swordplay for close work. Orienteering. Basic boy scout skills like pitching a tent and tying knots; first aid; salvage (maybe a dumpster diving group would be good for that?); and ultimately, of course, how to operate a zeppelin.


If decomposition persists please see your necromancer.

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#26 of 37 Old 11-01-2011, 07:31 PM
 
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Well, parkour, obviously; motorbiking, artillery training, possibly some swordplay for close work. Orienteering. Basic boy scout skills like pitching a tent and tying knots; first aid; salvage (maybe a dumpster diving group would be good for that?); and ultimately, of course, how to operate a zeppelin.


ROTFLMAO.gif- love it.  Hey, how about archery?

 


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#27 of 37 Old 11-02-2011, 12:29 PM
 
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Archery's dubious. The accepted lore is that you have to pretty much destroy or decapitate a zombie's whole head, or a very significant percentage of his body, to stop/kill it. So simply piercing its brain with an arrow wouldn't do it. A blast from a sawn-off shotgun that would pretty much blow the head off would probably work, which is why I included artillery training; but a single bullet from a pistol, again, wouldn't be very effective.

 

In theory you could use a bow and arrow to pin a zombie against a wall, which - depending on the rate of its decomposition - might hold it for a while, if you skewered a bone or something. But it'd be a temporary fix at best, given that they don't feel pain. Maybe flaming or exploding arrows would work? I hesitate to nix it, because archery's awesome; but realistically you'd probably be better off learning to wield a chainsaw. Still, if you took to the woods you could kill deer to survive, I guess. So yeah, sure, put archery on the list.


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#28 of 37 Old 11-02-2011, 08:56 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Smokering View Post

Archery's dubious. The accepted lore is that you have to pretty much destroy or decapitate a zombie's whole head, or a very significant percentage of his body, to stop/kill it. So simply piercing its brain with an arrow wouldn't do it. A blast from a sawn-off shotgun that would pretty much blow the head off would probably work, which is why I included artillery training; but a single bullet from a pistol, again, wouldn't be very effective.

 

In theory you could use a bow and arrow to pin a zombie against a wall, which - depending on the rate of its decomposition - might hold it for a while, if you skewered a bone or something. But it'd be a temporary fix at best, given that they don't feel pain. Maybe flaming or exploding arrows would work? I hesitate to nix it, because archery's awesome; but realistically you'd probably be better off learning to wield a chainsaw. Still, if you took to the woods you could kill deer to survive, I guess. So yeah, sure, put archery on the list.


 

lol.gif ... please stop ... I'm going to choke from laughing so hard ... ROTFLMAO.gif

 


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#29 of 37 Old 11-03-2011, 01:27 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Smokering View Post

Archery's dubious. The accepted lore is that you have to pretty much destroy or decapitate a zombie's whole head, or a very significant percentage of his body, to stop/kill it. So simply piercing its brain with an arrow wouldn't do it. A blast from a sawn-off shotgun that would pretty much blow the head off would probably work, which is why I included artillery training; but a single bullet from a pistol, again, wouldn't be very effective.

 

In theory you could use a bow and arrow to pin a zombie against a wall, which - depending on the rate of its decomposition - might hold it for a while, if you skewered a bone or something. But it'd be a temporary fix at best, given that they don't feel pain. Maybe flaming or exploding arrows would work? I hesitate to nix it, because archery's awesome; but realistically you'd probably be better off learning to wield a chainsaw. Still, if you took to the woods you could kill deer to survive, I guess. So yeah, sure, put archery on the list.



My DH, who has given serious thought to preparation for a zombie apocalypse, says you should be careful using fire with zombies.  If it is just burning, but not incapacitated, it could get up close to you and the fire would mostly endanger you.  I guess I'll take his advice.  I haven't sufficiently studied zombies.


Busy keeping up with three children and an awful lot of chickens!

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#30 of 37 Old 11-05-2011, 12:23 PM
 
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I didn't get to read through all this, so I'm not sure if anyone mentioned it but why not the Scouts?  They'll get a taste for all kinds of hobbies, all of them useful... especially for the impending Zombie apocalypse.

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