How do you think attachment parenting makes kids different (from other kids) as they get older? - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#31 of 47 Old 03-26-2012, 05:58 AM
 
Snydley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 54
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)

 

 

Quote:
I'm not the "perfect" AP parent, and I'm willing to bet that most people here aren't either. We're human, and we all make mistakes. I don't think its a good idea to go through your parenting journey thinking that you're going to do things just right so that your children don't end up like you and your brother - they might anyway! And then you'll have to come to terms with it, which will be easier if you don't put all your eggs in the AP basket thinking that they will turn out perfectly.

 

By "AP" I mean responding to your DC in the way that makes sense for you, thoughtful parenting in response to what is best for them.  My DD slept in a crib for years and I've never babyworn either!  I actually don't know the official rules of AP.   I don't expect DD to turn out perfect (as there is no such thing) I just want her to be as emotionally healthy as possible.  I don't think there's anything wrong with this being my #1 priority for her.  

 

Quote:
mostly we are all loving parents who are attentive to our child's needs

Maybe on these boards, but I'm much more cynical based on what I see IRL.  Maybe I'm just a Debbie Downer when it comes to this.  We had a hard time choosing who would be DD's legal guardians for our will and we were only looking for a semi-functional parenting style and marriage (I mean that's the best anyone can do, right?).   

 

 

Snydley is offline  
#32 of 47 Old 03-26-2012, 06:11 AM
 
Snydley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 54
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)

 

 

Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snydley View Post

 

I'll admit, I judge parents.  Most believe too strongly in genetics and don't think about what the heck they are doing.   Parenting is 1000x harder than I ever thought it would be and there is a HUGE lack of effort by many parents.  Include the breakdown of the community in this country (not living near relatives, don't know your neighbors) kids are going to have more problems than ever IMO.  I  do understand your perspective though.

 

-Jen

 



Thats fine, but when your kids have any issues whatsoever, I hope you blame it on yourself. Since, you know, you're blaming parents for all their kids issues.

 

Oh come on.  I'm not blaming parents for all their kids' issues by any stretch.  When I see a child who has been in front of a TV screen for 10+ hours a day since birth and winds up with attention issues and a speech delay, you don't think that maybe parenting had something to do with it?   Also, I'm surrounded by kids who are bought whatever they want whenever..to the point where on Xmas morning, they have no desire to go downstairs and open gifts.  The parents complain to me that they have no work ethic.  THIS is when I think to myself - hmmm  maybe the parents behavior had something to do with it.  

 

Do I judge the parents of a kid a see screaming in a store?  Of course not.  Mine's done that enough times, oh and she was a biter and actually spit in a kids' face last year..and we are going on TWO YEARS of potty training.    Are the PT issues my fault?  Who knows, maybe.  

 

If I see absurd/neglectful parenting, far beyond the norms, yea I think WTF.  I think if you say that you don't judge, when you see the parenting practices first hand, you're not being totally honest with yourself.   I don't judge a parent based on the actions of the child alone, of course. 

 

 

 

 

 

Snydley is offline  
#33 of 47 Old 03-26-2012, 06:37 AM
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Cover letter he!!
Posts: 6,548
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Snydley View Post

Oh come on.  I'm not blaming parents for all their kids' issues by any stretch.  When I see a child who has been in front of a TV screen for 10+ hours a day since birth and winds up with attention issues and a speech delay, you don't think that maybe parenting had something to do with it?   Also, I'm surrounded by kids who are bought whatever they want whenever..to the point where on Xmas morning, they have no desire to go downstairs and open gifts.  The parents complain to me that they have no work ethic.  THIS is when I think to myself - hmmm  maybe the parents behavior had something to do with it.  

 

Do I judge the parents of a kid a see screaming in a store?  Of course not.  Mine's done that enough times, oh and she was a biter and actually spit in a kids' face last year..and we are going on TWO YEARS of potty training.    Are the PT issues my fault?  Who knows, maybe.  

 

If I see absurd/neglectful parenting, far beyond the norms, yea I think WTF.  I think if you say that you don't judge, when you see the parenting practices first hand, you're not being totally honest with yourself.   I don't judge a parent based on the actions of the child alone, of course. 

 


Maybe i'm really out of touch - but I haven't seen ANY of these first hand. First off, I don't spend 10 hours with a child thats not MINE (I don't have that kind of time - I'm a single mom and I work). You really see kids whose parents buy them everything constantly? I don't. Again, maybe I'm out of touch, or your job has you working with these families. I believe you that these types of things happen, but I do not believe that it is all the time, or that you are surrounded by it.

 

As for potty training taking 2 years, you should just give it up. They'll get it when they get it.

 

Super~Single~Mama is offline  
#34 of 47 Old 03-26-2012, 06:41 AM
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Cover letter he!!
Posts: 6,548
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Snydley View Post

 

 

 

By "AP" I mean responding to your DC in the way that makes sense for you, thoughtful parenting in response to what is best for them.  My DD slept in a crib for years and I've never babyworn either!  I actually don't know the official rules of AP.   I don't expect DD to turn out perfect (as there is no such thing) I just want her to be as emotionally healthy as possible.  I don't think there's anything wrong with this being my #1 priority for her.  

 

Your point? Most people do that. At least most people that I know IRL (I don't base my parenting stuff 100% on MDC, especially since I don't know any of these folks IRL). Even when they don't, they are usually good, loving parents, who want what is best for their children.

 

Maybe on these boards, but I'm much more cynical based on what I see IRL.  Maybe I'm just a Debbie Downer when it comes to this.  We had a hard time choosing who would be DD's legal guardians for our will and we were only looking for a semi-functional parenting style and marriage (I mean that's the best anyone can do, right?).   

 

 


I haven't even chosen a legal guardian - if I die, my ds goes to his dad. If his dad predeceases me, well, I'll figure it out then.

 

Super~Single~Mama is offline  
#35 of 47 Old 03-26-2012, 07:18 AM - Thread Starter
 
parsley's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: in between
Posts: 773
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

So... I started this thread really as an open question of how is it different.  I wasn't AT ALL arguing that my kid is better or looking to compare my kids with others or compare my parenting with others (though I agree that it's impossible to not be somewhat judgemental at times, I keep it to myself).  When I said that I think how I parent matters, I didn't say I think how I parent is better but that my parenting practices have specific effects on my kids!

 

I was really just ruminating on how specific parenting practices that are outside the norm result in changes to the established developmental timeline.  I mentioned crawling in my first post.  Kids used to be expected to crawl earlier than they are expected to crawl today because kids used to sleep on their tummies and therefore learned to crawl sooner.  Now, kids (as a whole) are put to sleep on their backs, they have occasional tummy time and they learn to crawl later.  And, my own kid and many others never crawl.  My older daughter developed great trunk strength through babywearing and breastfeeding and went straight to cruising and then walking.  That is NOT better... it's different.  Not crawling = a missed developmental marker.  Early cruising and walking = an early developmental marker. 

 

That's the type of thing I was ruminating about.  There are a couple of other examples in the early part of the thread... how breastfeeding instead of bottle feeding may make a kid different.  Sleeping habits and spaces, babywearing v. car seats and strollers, etc...  The milestones and benchmarks established by American Pediatric association and others are based on how we as a culture parent our children.  When groups of people parent differently we can expect those milestones and benchmarks to look different.  (for another example, see the differences between CDC and WHO growth charts). 

 

Lynn and others, I see your point that this type of reasoning can lead to arguing that parents are responsible for kids problems (mental health, autism, etc...).  And, I agree it's so sad when people blame themselves for their kids problems despite doing everything they can to help their kid.  I certainly don't want to add to that burden!  And, I can see how my reference to hitting milestones early or late may have eclipsed my own bigger point and been insensitive to parents dealing with delays and special needs.  I was really thinking more abstractly.  From my perspective, all kids are born with a unique set of potential strengths and their parents help them bring out those strengths, responsive parenting of any type can do that but I think HOW a parent responds can lead to bringing out different strengths. 

 

 


Partner to DH and mom to DD1 (3/2008) and DD2 (born 1/2012).
parsley is offline  
#36 of 47 Old 03-26-2012, 07:20 AM
 
contactmaya's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 2,073
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)

Did not read last posts though it looks like an interesting discussion. Personally, its hard for me to draw a distinction between what is good parenting a la AP,  and plain old flashioned ethics. For me, doing AP is about doing what is right towards another person, all the more so because of their dependence on you.   I see alot of practical advantages to AP, that make life easier for me,  and some that make life more difficult. But ultimately, i find AP practices make life easier in the longterm.

 

 Bottom line though, its how i treat my child now and the relationship i have with them as a consequence,  rather than how i expect them to turn out, which is foremost in my mind in my parenting.

 

This certainly  connects to mental well being, but i would not say that parenting is the only determinent of mental health in the long term.  

contactmaya is online now  
#37 of 47 Old 03-26-2012, 07:49 AM
 
Snydley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 54
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by contactmaya View Post

Did not read last posts though it looks like an interesting discussion. Personally, its hard for me to draw a distinction between what is good parenting a la AP,  and plain old flashioned ethics. For me, doing AP is about doing what is right towards another person, all the more so because of their dependence on you.   I see alot of practical advantages to AP, that make life easier for me,  and some that make life more difficult. But ultimately, i find AP practices make life easier in the longterm.

 

 Bottom line though, its how i treat my child now and the relationship i have with them as a consequence,  rather than how i expect them to turn out, which is foremost in my mind in my parenting.

 

This certainly  connects to mental well being, but i would not say that parenting is the only determinent of mental health in the long term.  

Well said.  


 

Quote:

Maybe i'm really out of touch - but I haven't seen ANY of these first hand. First off, I don't spend 10 hours with a child thats not MINE (I don't have that kind of time - I'm a single mom and I work). You really see kids whose parents buy them everything constantly? I don't. Again, maybe I'm out of touch, or your job has you working with these families. I believe you that these types of things happen, but I do not believe that it is all the time, or that you are surrounded by it.

Yes my job has me around these families - ironically, these are our good friends from grad school and now we have relocated in the same city.   By 'surrounded' I mean not unusual.   As far as the baby in front of the screen all the time, the girl is now 6 and has zero screen time limits, including her own IPAD for the car/restaurants, etc, and she is never put to bed and is typically up until 12-1am watching tv.  We had a hurricane come through last fall and her parents bought a generator because they didn't want to deal with her without tv for 48 hours.  Really....and they are the nicest people!  Just not making the best parenting choices IMO. 

 

When I lived in San Fran, I'd go to the park and almost every parent was always emailing on a blackberry.  Since I'm kinda immersed in this type of lifestyle, once I found the book simplicity parenting I was so happy! I refer to it often.  I am lucky to have moved to a great neighborhood with awesome families however.  

 

Quote:
As for potty training taking 2 years, you should just give it up. They'll get it when they get it.

 

I've tried that!  Haha.  Kindergarten is in the fall and she'll be sent to the nurse for pooping in her pants.  I'm only hopeful because they seem to sell pull-ups in 6T so maybe that means in a year she'll decide to stop what she's doing and go on the toilet.  wink1.gif

 

 

 

 

Snydley is offline  
#38 of 47 Old 03-26-2012, 08:19 AM - Thread Starter
 
parsley's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: in between
Posts: 773
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:

Originally Posted by contactmaya View Post

 

I see alot of practical advantages to AP, that make life easier for me,  and some that make life more difficult. But ultimately, i find AP practices make life easier in the longterm.

 



I agree!  And in the short term for me as well... I can anticipate my babes needs and accomodate them so that I'm able to also do other things.  I can put the baby in the wrap and then have a meeting.  I know she's comforted and comfortable and I've managed to do that before she starts to scream which means I can then have my meeting! 

 

Another dimension of all this that too is how children learn about parenting.  My older daughter and I are having lots of conversations about cribs, formula, disposable diapers, etc... as she sees me choose and defend these choices for her new sister. 


Partner to DH and mom to DD1 (3/2008) and DD2 (born 1/2012).
parsley is offline  
#39 of 47 Old 03-26-2012, 08:36 AM
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Cover letter he!!
Posts: 6,548
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Snydley View Post


 

When I lived in San Fran, I'd go to the park and almost every parent was always emailing on a blackberry.  Since I'm kinda immersed in this type of lifestyle, once I found the book simplicity parenting I was so happy! I refer to it often.  I am lucky to have moved to a great neighborhood with awesome families however.  

 



Well I use my iPhone when I'm at the park with my ds. It's down time for me - especially now that he's old enough not to need my constant attention. We don't have a tv at home though, so he's not drowned in screen time. I hope people don't see me looking at my iPhone and think, "Oh boy, her ds must be a vegetable at home"

Super~Single~Mama is offline  
#40 of 47 Old 03-26-2012, 10:24 AM
 
mamazee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: US midwest
Posts: 7,500
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I look at my phone at the park too. I think that's a good example of why judging can be a problem. It involves making assumptions. Why is it bad to look at my phone when at the park?
mamazee is offline  
#41 of 47 Old 03-26-2012, 10:50 AM
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Cover letter he!!
Posts: 6,548
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by mamazee View Post

I look at my phone at the park too. I think that's a good example of why judging can be a problem. It involves making assumptions. Why is it bad to look at my phone when at the park?


Because our lives don't revolve 100% around our children every moment that we're with them? AP doesn't require that though....at least I didn't think so.

Super~Single~Mama is offline  
#42 of 47 Old 03-26-2012, 10:51 AM
 
Snydley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 54
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)

Man when will I learn!  Not what I meant...more that the 'tech' careers are unrelenting in it's demands (the more work you do, the more they give you), and as a result parents with these kinds of jobs have a hard time shutting off and not working.   I have this problem with my job and have on many occasions put DD in front of a movie for a conference call on days that I'm supposed to be off work.  Again, if I see a parent on the internet at a park I of course wouldn't think twice, but when 10-12 are lined up along a sandbox on active conference calls and emailing, etc it just striking to see.   I only saw this in San Fran as that is the home of google, linkedin, and biotech.  

Snydley is offline  
#43 of 47 Old 03-26-2012, 11:06 AM
 
CatsCradle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: New York City
Posts: 2,006
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Snydley View Post

  Again, if I see a parent on the internet at a park I of course wouldn't think twice, but when 10-12 are lined up along a sandbox on active conference calls and emailing, etc it just striking to see.   I only saw this in San Fran as that is the home of google, linkedin, and biotech.  

Speaking for myself and others like me, I think that part of it is due to the proliferation of flex-time and the virtual office.  I'm old enough to remember the days where the only place that you could work was in a physical office. Face time was as important as doing your job well.  I actually feel pretty lucky to be viturally connected because it means that I am not required to be married to a desk in the middle of the city.  I love the flexibility and freedom it gives me.  It means that I can spend more time with DD or be there for her without the stress of missing work.  This is not to say that there aren't people who are addicted to technology - there are plenty of people out there like that.  But as a working tool, I'll take it any day over the old days! 
 

 


"Lawyers, I suppose, were children once." Charles Lamb.
CatsCradle is offline  
#44 of 47 Old 03-26-2012, 11:40 AM
 
berry987's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 710
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Interesting thread. I think one problem with the AP or not-AP comparisons are that most people aren't 100% AP or 100% not-AP. We ALL parent on a continuum and of course all children are different so making comparisons is nearly impossible. 

 

I have four kids and while I consider myself a thoughtful, loving, intuitive parent, I am not AP. I have a pituitary disorder that makes me unable to breastfeed so my kids drank formula and a bit of donor milk from bottles. That said, I always held them when they drank, often took off my shirt to get skin-to-skin time, etc. We co-slept for about 4 months with each child, but found ourselves so sleep deprived (mainly because I was so worried about rolling on the baby that I'd wake often) that we moved them out of our bed around that time. At the same time, now that they aren't babies they climb into bed with us a few times a week and we don't move them back to their beds. They've never CIO but they were also not fussy babies so a few minutes of rocking usually did the trick. I do time outs, but its used as a way for them to "think about their behavior" and get some quiet time away to calm themselves down. I try not to yell, but do occasionally, of course. I vaccinate - selectively, but I studied epidemiology in grad school and well, I was convinced. We limit TV to a couple times a week and they eat and drink a very different diet than most kids their age (Weston Price-style), but we fit right in with everyone at school. They play with toy guns, eat junk food at birthday parties, get mouthy sometimes and get in trouble for it, treat animals with great respect and love, generally play nicely and share, and have their good days and bad days. They are bright and inquisitive, thoughtful and caring, generally just sweet boys. They can also be loud and impulsive and whine like crazy when they don't get what they want.

 

I think the idea that non-AP parents are feeding tons of junk food, plopping their kids in front of the TV all day, smacking them and ignoring their screaming babies is misguided. Those things just make you a pretty crappy parent, AP or not. And for the parents who do the full-AP way of life, I think, as other posters have said, the differences would be so minimal it would be hard to notice. Most likely, even if you'd never heard about AP and were just parenting as best you could you'd probably still be a pretty good parent because good parents, IMO, love their kids and show them that, set boundaries and stick to them, nourish their minds and bodies as best they can, and hope for the best.

Super~Single~Mama and CI Mama like this.

berry987 is offline  
#45 of 47 Old 03-26-2012, 01:01 PM
 
Storm Bride's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 27,300
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by berry987 View Post

Interesting thread. I think one problem with the AP or not-AP comparisons are that most people aren't 100% AP or 100% not-AP. We ALL parent on a continuum and of course all children are different so making comparisons is nearly impossible. 

 

I have four kids and while I consider myself a thoughtful, loving, intuitive parent, I am not AP. I have a pituitary disorder that makes me unable to breastfeed so my kids drank formula and a bit of donor milk from bottles. That said, I always held them when they drank, often took off my shirt to get skin-to-skin time, etc. We co-slept for about 4 months with each child, but found ourselves so sleep deprived (mainly because I was so worried about rolling on the baby that I'd wake often) that we moved them out of our bed around that time. At the same time, now that they aren't babies they climb into bed with us a few times a week and we don't move them back to their beds. They've never CIO but they were also not fussy babies so a few minutes of rocking usually did the trick. I do time outs, but its used as a way for them to "think about their behavior" and get some quiet time away to calm themselves down. I try not to yell, but do occasionally, of course. I vaccinate - selectively, but I studied epidemiology in grad school and well, I was convinced. We limit TV to a couple times a week and they eat and drink a very different diet than most kids their age (Weston Price-style), but we fit right in with everyone at school. They play with toy guns, eat junk food at birthday parties, get mouthy sometimes and get in trouble for it, treat animals with great respect and love, generally play nicely and share, and have their good days and bad days. They are bright and inquisitive, thoughtful and caring, generally just sweet boys. They can also be loud and impulsive and whine like crazy when they don't get what they want.

 

I think the idea that non-AP parents are feeding tons of junk food, plopping their kids in front of the TV all day, smacking them and ignoring their screaming babies is misguided. Those things just make you a pretty crappy parent, AP or not. And for the parents who do the full-AP way of life, I think, as other posters have said, the differences would be so minimal it would be hard to notice. Most likely, even if you'd never heard about AP and were just parenting as best you could you'd probably still be a pretty good parent because good parents, IMO, love their kids and show them that, set boundaries and stick to them, nourish their minds and bodies as best they can, and hope for the best.


My only issue with this post is the way a strict, formal definition of AP has taken over. If one can't breastfeed, that doesn't make one non-AP, imo. I honestly don't see anything you've posted that makes you non-AP. I did many things that were totally "not" AP with dd1, because they would have been damaging to her (eg. limited babywearing, because she frequently hated it). I can't twist the definition fo "attachment parenting" to mean "check off list items that damage my child and damage said child's attachment to me".

 

However, while I think the definition of AP is frequently too narrow, I also think there are good parents who aren't AP, by any definition. I know one couple who practiced CIO to an extent that made me sick to my stomach. I think it was to the point of being abusive. I also know they truly believed it was in the best interests of their children (bought a lot of that "must self-soothe" stuff). The children in question are now five and seven years old, and their parents spend a lot time with them, do crafts with them, lavish attention on them, etc. I couldn't consider their parenting to be AP, even by a loose definition (even since the CIO years) - but they're loving, attentive parents, and they certainly don't just park their kids in front of a tv all day and scream at them. They're good parents, for the most part - they're just not AP. (And, that "for the most part" wasn't a slam - I'm not always a good parent, either.)


Lisa, lucky mama of Kelly (3/93) ribboncesarean.gif, Emma (5/03) ribboncesarean.gif, Evan (7/05) ribboncesarean.gif, & Jenna (6/09) ribboncesarean.gif
Loving my amazing dh, James & forever missing ribbonpb.gif Aaron Ambrose ribboncesarean.gif (11/07) ribbonpb.gif

Storm Bride is offline  
#46 of 47 Old 03-26-2012, 01:13 PM
 
berry987's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 710
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post


My only issue with this post is the way a strict, formal definition of AP has taken over. If one can't breastfeed, that doesn't make one non-AP, imo. I honestly don't see anything you've posted that makes you non-AP.

 

 

I agree that the definition of AP is too narrow because really the underlying values are similar between loving, nurturing parents...regardless of techniques. But I think by the MDC definition I would not be considered AP - because I don't breastfeed, don't co-sleep, we vax our kids and we do time-outs. All of those things together make me sound pretty mainstream. And that was my point, really - that comparing AP to non-AP kids is pretty futile because you're either comparing kids based on strict guidelines (how long did they breastfeed, cosleep, etc) or else you're basically comparing loving parents to abusive or neglectful parents....in which case the outcome doesn't have much to do with breastfeeding on demand and more to do with not being a horrible parent. 

Storm Bride likes this.

berry987 is offline  
#47 of 47 Old 03-26-2012, 01:28 PM
 
meemee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Norther California
Posts: 12,783
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Snydley View Post

I've tried that!  Haha.  Kindergarten is in the fall and she'll be sent to the nurse for pooping in her pants.  I'm only hopeful because they seem to sell pull-ups in 6T so maybe that means in a year she'll decide to stop what she's doing and go on the toilet.  wink1.gif

i dont have time to post but i just returned from a 4th grade overnight field trip where i was a chaperone. i was surprised by how many kids still wet their bed. i did till my teens but i was surprised to see how 'common' it was rather than not. of course i am talking about night time bed wetters. 

 

and OP if your child is anything like mine - mine hates her school bathroom and v. v. rarely uses it. in her 5 years of school i can say she has used the bathroom maybe a hand ful of times. 


 treehugger.gif Co-parent, joy.gifcold.gifbrand new homeschooling middle schoolerjoy.gif, and an attackcat.gif 
meemee is offline  
Reply

Tags
Parenting

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off