Entice your kids to eat veggies. - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 13 Old 10-03-2012, 07:22 AM - Thread Starter
 
journeymom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Having a Gilly Water with McGonagall
Posts: 9,766
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)

It's an on-going struggle to get kids to eat vegetables.  This article was in the paper today, and I immediately thought of MDC.

 

http://www.sacbee.com/2012/10/03/4875202/entice-kids-with-flavors-of-roasted.html

 


I've had good luck with roasted root veggies. Cubed carrots, turnips, potatoes, leeks, tossed with olive oil, salt and rosemary. It smells fantastic while it's roasting.  My kids eat some, not a lot of it, but that's OK.


Someone moved my effing cheese.
journeymom is offline  
#2 of 13 Old 10-03-2012, 08:16 AM
 
mamazee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: US midwest
Posts: 7,500
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
One of mine eats roasted carrots like they're going out of style. She'd happily eat a whole plate just of that. Yum! She calls them "carrot fries" because she thinks it's like having french fries.
mamazee is offline  
#3 of 13 Old 10-03-2012, 05:01 PM
 
swd12422's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 2,133
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)

Roasting is how I got *myself* to eat veggies, and it's working for the kids, too. I roast cauliflower or brussels sprouts tossed in olive oil and sprinkled with salt and pepper, and they get all crispy outside and soft inside.... mmmmmm...... Never in a million years would I ever have expected to hear my son ask for more brussels sprouts instead of more meat or potatoes at a meal.
 

swd12422 is online now  
#4 of 13 Old 10-04-2012, 07:33 AM - Thread Starter
 
journeymom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Having a Gilly Water with McGonagall
Posts: 9,766
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)

I'll have to try roasting cauliflower. I rarely cook it, but I grew up eating it.   My SIL made roasted brussels sprouts for Thanksgiving, and they were crazy good.  She tossed them with balsamic vinegar before cooking them.


Someone moved my effing cheese.
journeymom is offline  
#5 of 13 Old 10-04-2012, 12:13 PM
 
meemee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Norther California
Posts: 12,767
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)

roasting is our favourite way to go too.

 

dd's favourites since babyhood have been roasted beets (skin and all), butternut squash, cauliflower and brocolli (key is roasting them and then the last couple of minutes broiling them so you burn the brocolli and cauliflower a tiny bit). 

 

i also toast frozen lima beans till they are pretty done and a little dried up so they are crunchy. DD lOVES that too. 

 

an interesting book that i read was Kelly Dorfman's http://whatseatingyourchild.com/

 

i wonder if her take on lack of zinc affects children's lack of taste for veggies.

 

however no matter what dd's bf still wont touch veggies. 

 

another recipe for brussle sprout haters.

 

fry b.s. on stove top till they get blistery (little black drops), then mix in some maple syrup AFTER you take the pan off the flame. i get non veggie eaters to have brocolli and brussel sprouts this way. to really cook the bs i first fry them and then steam them by adding two tbs of water and covering the pan.


 treehugger.gif Co-parent, joy.gifcold.gifbrand new homeschooling middle schoolerjoy.gif, and an attackcat.gif 
meemee is offline  
#6 of 13 Old 10-05-2012, 09:47 AM
 
Evan&Anna's_Mom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: So. CA
Posts: 4,477
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Our favorite brussel sprouts are sauteed.  Slice sprouts crosswise in very thin slices (so you get circles).  Saute in butter with lots of salt and pepper until tender and a bit carmelized around the edges (so some brown).  If you really need to amp up the flavor, do this with bacon and bacon fat rather than butter.

 

If you aren't worried about fat grams, gratin is another option -- sliced and baked with cream and cheese.

 

Other than that, roasting is definitely a way to make veggies sweeter and thus more likely to be eaten.  And baby veggies (we get ours from the farmers market) always seem to be more appealing that full sized ones.

Evan&Anna's_Mom is offline  
#7 of 13 Old 10-09-2012, 09:56 AM
 
AllisonR's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 3,137
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

My kids eat a ton of vegetables - as long as they are fresh and raw. Carrots, cucumber, snap peas, broccoli, spinach, cabbage... As soon it is cooked they won't touch it. I like both raw and cooked. The only thing I don't like is going to my in-laws, where they pull carrots and pick peas straight from the garden - they are so naturally sweet and wonderful - and then throw them in a pot of boiling water for 10 minutes. Talking about ruining something beautiful. 

AllisonR is offline  
#8 of 13 Old 10-09-2012, 10:24 AM
 
transylvania_mom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: abroad
Posts: 1,080
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Ds loves green salads; if we have a main dish with salad, he eats several servings of salad and nothing else.

 

Dd wouldn't touch a raw vegetable but loves soups. So I put 1 lb of vegetables in any soup I make and she gets her vegetables from there.

We'll have to try roasted veggies, they sound delicious.


caffix.gif

transylvania_mom is offline  
#9 of 13 Old 10-12-2012, 05:16 PM
 
Storm Bride's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 27,300
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

My kids tend to go for the raw veggies, and not like the cooked ones. They don't care for salads (we use a prepackaged Spring Mix a lot), but will happily eat raw kale, or kale chips (one of the few exceptions to cooked veggies). DD1 will also eat cooked green beans, but only a few at a sitting. She'll usually eat one boiled/steamed Brussels sprout. I mostly don't even bother to cook veggies, anymore. They get a bit in soup, spaghetti, etc. (all of them but ds1 are good with cooked tomatoes, which is a relief, as you couldn't pay me to eat them when I was growing up).

 

DD2 has become hooked on Wonderpets on Netflix, and has become kind of addicted to celery. Her siblings have jumped on board, and we're going through a bunch or two of celery a week right now! They also happily chow down on raw carrots and sugar snap peas, plus the aforementioned kale. DS2 and dd2 also help themselves to raw kale, but dd1 isn't so into it.

 

I may start trying some roasted veggies. I don't know if the kids will like them, but a lot of them sound delicious to me!


Lisa, lucky mama of Kelly (3/93) ribboncesarean.gif, Emma (5/03) ribboncesarean.gif, Evan (7/05) ribboncesarean.gif, & Jenna (6/09) ribboncesarean.gif
Loving my amazing dh, James & forever missing ribbonpb.gif Aaron Ambrose ribboncesarean.gif (11/07) ribbonpb.gif

Storm Bride is offline  
#10 of 13 Old 10-14-2012, 03:58 PM
 
Iridescent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Ontario
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Mine are the exact opposite. Well, my younger is. My older is a human garbage disposal and will eat anything.

 

My younger will eat veggies by the armful, but only likes them raw. If they're cooked, in a sauce/dip, "hidden" in something which I've never believed in, or in another dish, forgettaboutit. I've had to tell her off for eating peas and string beans right off the plants so there's some left, but as soon as I saute them in butter and garlic, they may as well be old shoes and newspaper. She'll eat it if push comes to shove, but it's no work at all to simply leave things raw.

 

 

My method for getting my kids to try any new food is this: I wait until snack time. Get the new food, cut it up into small pieces with a bunch of other things - divided up of course, not all mixed- in bite-sized pieces. Some things they really, really like, a few things they like/are okay with and used to eating, and one or two things they're not comfortable with or haven't seen before. I set them on a big plate. And I leave.

 

There's no pressure to try, no comments if they don't, and no prep work involved for them. IME, if people of any age are comfortable with roughly 75% of the things on a plate, they're much more willing to try the thing they're uncomfortable with.

 

So for instance my youngest and pickiest might get a plate with grapes and mandarin slices (loves), granola bar bites and carrot rounds (likes), bits of salami (neutral on) and something she's never seen before, like our recent adventure with pineapple.

9 times out of 10, she'll try the unknown food, because the other food has served as a kind of primer that everything on that plate is "safe" and that I'm not giving her something horrible. That, combined with the no-pressure atmosphere and no consequence if she doesn't eat it, makes it very easy for her to try. She knows no one is going to stand over her and make her take x bites of it, or scold her, or hold it until the next meal until she gets too hungry and tries it out of desperation, or any of the other time-honored parenting tactics that have created a generation of wonderfully healthy eaters and healthy minds about food. (eyeroll) If she doesn't try it that time, oh well, it's just a small amoutn and I'll keep it off the snack plate for a few days/weeks then try it again. Eventually almost everything gets tried.

Iridescent is offline  
#11 of 13 Old 10-14-2012, 04:15 PM
 
Katielady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Living in a van down by the river
Posts: 2,048
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iridescent View Post

Mine are the exact opposite. Well, my younger is. My older is a human garbage disposal and will eat anything.

 

My younger will eat veggies by the armful, but only likes them raw. If they're cooked, in a sauce/dip, "hidden" in something which I've never believed in, or in another dish, forgettaboutit. I've had to tell her off for eating peas and string beans right off the plants so there's some left, but as soon as I saute them in butter and garlic, they may as well be old shoes and newspaper. She'll eat it if push comes to shove, but it's no work at all to simply leave things raw.

 

 

My method for getting my kids to try any new food is this: I wait until snack time. Get the new food, cut it up into small pieces with a bunch of other things - divided up of course, not all mixed- in bite-sized pieces. Some things they really, really like, a few things they like/are okay with and used to eating, and one or two things they're not comfortable with or haven't seen before. I set them on a big plate. And I leave.

 

There's no pressure to try, no comments if they don't, and no prep work involved for them. IME, if people of any age are comfortable with roughly 75% of the things on a plate, they're much more willing to try the thing they're uncomfortable with.

 

So for instance my youngest and pickiest might get a plate with grapes and mandarin slices (loves), granola bar bites and carrot rounds (likes), bits of salami (neutral on) and something she's never seen before, like our recent adventure with pineapple.

9 times out of 10, she'll try the unknown food, because the other food has served as a kind of primer that everything on that plate is "safe" and that I'm not giving her something horrible. That, combined with the no-pressure atmosphere and no consequence if she doesn't eat it, makes it very easy for her to try. She knows no one is going to stand over her and make her take x bites of it, or scold her, or hold it until the next meal until she gets too hungry and tries it out of desperation, or any of the other time-honored parenting tactics that have created a generation of wonderfully healthy eaters and healthy minds about food. (eyeroll) If she doesn't try it that time, oh well, it's just a small amoutn and I'll keep it off the snack plate for a few days/weeks then try it again. Eventually almost everything gets tried.

 

That's an awesome idea- I'm gonna try it with my picky dude!


SAHM to 6.5yo DS and 4yo DD. PCOS with two early m/cs. Married 8 yrs. Certified birth doula, writer, editor.

Some stuff I like: hbac.gifteapot2.GIFeat.gifnocirc.gifbftoddler.giffemalesling.GIFcrochetsmilie.gif read.gifcat.gif

Katielady is offline  
#12 of 13 Old 10-14-2012, 06:33 PM
 
swd12422's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 2,133
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)

Something I just discovered that works for my 3- and 4-year olds: Peanut sauce. Seriously. If it's peanut butter, the 3-year-old will eat it, no matter what. The 4 yo will usually try anything once. I had stir-fried some bok choy for my lunch and decided to throw in some peanut butter at the last minute b/c it was still out from making the boys' sandwiches. When I sat down, they both looked and wanted to try some. Both liked it and asked for more. Never in a million years would I have guessed that... Although lately the 4 yo has been eating all the raw veggies and leaving his sandwich over. Go figure.
 

swd12422 is online now  
#13 of 13 Old 10-15-2012, 01:37 PM
 
JudiAU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Where creepy facebook-featured threads can't find me
Posts: 3,610
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)

A few things that work for us:

 

serving vegetables first so they go in while the kids are hungry

soy sauce and all of it cousins

well done rather than al dente

vegetables as a a well prepared dish (honey roasted carrots, green beans in soy sauce butter) rather than blanched or steamed

a bit of salt and fat

JudiAU is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off