What life skills should every child learn? - Mothering Forums
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#1 of 18 Old 07-09-2013, 10:09 AM - Thread Starter
 
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What is it important to for all children to learn to do for themselves before they become adults?

I'd say:

Cook complete, healthy meals
Laundry
Manage money
Make phone calls or contact people they are in disagreement with to deal with problems


That list is pretty incomplete, but those are things that I hope my children will not be calling me for help with when they're adults. I hope they learn those things as kids and teens.
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#2 of 18 Old 07-09-2013, 10:16 AM
 
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1) Swimming

 

2) biking

 

3)Cooking

 

4)Laundry

 

5) Banking

 

6) First Aid and CPR

 

7) One owns medication medicine , knowing what one is allergic to etc

 

8) How to deal with stupid people.

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#3 of 18 Old 07-09-2013, 05:07 PM
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Save money - at least some percentage of your income

 

Buy groceries  - read labels and compare, know bad stuff from good

 

Manners

 

Basic repairs

 

Dressing appropriately for the occasion

 

Time management


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#4 of 18 Old 07-09-2013, 06:22 PM
 
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Good work ethics
Social skills for a variety of settings
How to do laundry
How to follow a recipe
Problem Solving skills
Money management skills
How to clean
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#5 of 18 Old 07-09-2013, 07:43 PM
 
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Hmm I agree with a lot of these. Let me try to make my list:

Communication
Hygiene
Money management & basic math
Emotional control
Water safety, fire safety, first aid (swimming)
Cooking/ food prep & grocery shopping
Cleaning & laundry, including ironing and minor mending
Simple home and car maintenance (or when to call an expert)
Map reading/ compass use/ gps use
How to use public transportation
How to safely ask for and get help in a variety of situations
how to type & use computers
How to evaluate risk
Determining credible sources
Basic nutrition and human anatomy
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#6 of 18 Old 07-09-2013, 08:33 PM
 
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Be discerning; do the research and not just take someone's word for it (whatever "it" is--politics, religion, science, health, internet scams, etc.).  Learn to balance their checkbook, budget their money, use credit wisely.  Be polite and respectful of others beliefs and convictions and know how to debate them without name calling.  Have an answer to why they do things--everything from diapering to voting to composting (or not).  And not "because that's how my parents, friends, etc do t".  I'd rather they do the opposite of what they were taught with good research behind their reasons than blindly follow in my footsteps.
 

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#7 of 18 Old 07-09-2013, 08:37 PM
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I'll add: how to grow food (gardening).  Also how to do a specific skill/hobby (playing a musical instrument, etc.)


"Our task is not to see the future, but to enable it."
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#8 of 18 Old 07-09-2013, 11:09 PM
 
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play a musical instrument. might get you side jobs you might enjoy. 

 

one sports skill you can enjoy into as long as you want. 

 

develop an interest in a hobby that you'd carry with you into retirement. 

 

an art class. serious art class. not a foo foo class where you can learn to 'see' not so much draw. coz if you can see you can draw. 

 

an appreciation of things around you - art, good literature, movies and be able to take a stand for your own opinions no matter what others say. 

 

one other language

 

typing

 

self discipline even if you hate doing it.

 

learn to prioritize.

 

learn to sew (both genders)

 

basic car care

 

basic home repairs

 

childcare - esp. babies.

 

elder care if you have them in your family (meaning doing things before you are asked coz you are aware if they use walkers how hard it is for them to walk).


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#9 of 18 Old 07-10-2013, 11:28 AM
 
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What I want my children to learn are three basic things that have many subcategories....

 

  1. Basic Life Survival Skills - which includes things like cooking and balancing basic meals, reading, writing, basic first aid and CPR, knowing how to swim, interact with people (including reading basic body language and a variety of social skills), money management, building a fire, changing a tire, finding shelter and really this list could be endless. But for me the main point is, can they keep themselves alive in the very basic of manner
  2. Common Sense - can they take a step back, take a deep breath and think through their problems. Can they figure out how to search out the answers of how to do things themselves. Of course it would be great if they knew how to do laundry before they left (my two do for the most part know the basics) but if they didn't have this skill then do they have a way of figuring out what they need to learn and how to find the answers or directions on how to learn the skills they need
  3. A good strong Work Ethic - While this is number 1 on my list, it's in the 3rd spot because having some of the each of the above makes this one easier. I really think this is one of the major things that is missing in a lot of people right now, I saw it at my old job and I'm seeing it in DH's line of work. I look at some family members that may not have graduated highschool or gone to University/Collage, but they were willing to start at the bottom, keep their heads down and work hard. They also had some basic survival skills although maybe not all of the ones I'd like my kids to have and they have a lot of common sense.

 

Truly I think these three things are the most important thing I could send my children off into the world with. I tell my kids all the time when I'm teaching them something that I'm not raising them to be kids, I'm raising them to be hardworking productive adults. I could care less about their choices and how they get there. They can love who they want, be who they want and do things they way they want (which will not always be my way). All I ask is that they Work hard, use their own heads and find the answers to their problems or questions and keep themselves fed and warm and healthy.

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#10 of 18 Old 07-10-2013, 11:34 AM
 
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Keep an open mind but not an empty one. 

 

 

As well as all the other good stuff listed upthread. 

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#11 of 18 Old 07-10-2013, 04:23 PM
 
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Everything above plus the ability to adapt quickly. It may have been said already but I just sort of skimmed through. It's one thing I'm struggling to learn. I'm slow to accept change and handle challenges that are initially defeating or leave me feeling rejected. Gotta learn to pick yourself back up and keep moving.
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#12 of 18 Old 07-11-2013, 12:15 AM
 
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Critical thinking.

Creativity.

Basic survival (not crazy prepper/bunker survival, lost-in-the-woods survival, like how to get clean water).

Swimming.

How to cook basic things.

How to maintain a basically clean (if not organized or pretty) environment.


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#13 of 18 Old 07-11-2013, 08:31 AM
 
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How to live and work with people with differing beliefs and judgments with grace and civility.

 

How to disagree with loved ones.

 

How to pick up new skills, out of necessity or curiosity.

 

How to bounce back from failure.

 

Know when to ask for directions and help, and when they can work things out for themselves.

 

How to change a tire, or patch a bike tire.


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#14 of 18 Old 07-13-2013, 08:14 PM
 
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How to travel -- how to read a bus or train schedule, call a taxi, book a plane ticket (and find a cheap fare), get around an airport/bus station, read a map and drive a car (even if they chose not to own one), and navigate around an unfamiliar place on foot.

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#15 of 18 Old 07-14-2013, 07:52 AM
 
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My top 5...

  1. Manners
  2. how to save/manage her money
  3. the difference between confident and cocky
  4. empathy and respect for others (including animals)
  5. doing 'work' that your passionate about not just paid for (that said, she'll still be expected to work as a teen and will likely have some service related jobs which i'm fine with as I think this also teaches respect for people and the various jobs they do).
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#16 of 18 Old 07-17-2013, 09:05 AM
 
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I agree with all of these. I just wanted to add that, though I just turned 30, I still call my parents and my husband's parents to ask them for advice on alot of the mentioned subjects: finances, cooking, raising my son, dealing with difficult people... Even though I technically "know" how to deal with these things and how to "problem solve", I also think it is important to seek advice and consult with your loved ones (and/or people more wise or experienced than yourself) if and when you need.

 

I obviously don't want to be telling my sons what to do when they are adults, but I would hope that I raised them with the feeling that they can always come to us as parents to help "kick ideas around" or to share different perspectives. I would also hope that they had enough common sense to consult with others when they are problem solving and to consult with us prior to making big life decisions (e.g. marriage.)

 

I suppose learning to consult, seek and analyze different perspectives could be considered a life skill, as well.
 

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#17 of 18 Old 07-17-2013, 11:35 AM
 
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Things no one taught me but should have:  how to rent an apartment, buy a car, buy insurance, get utilities hooked up, manage money, have a job.  Also how to go to college.  I didn't know how to manage going to college, how to pay for it, manage my time and resources.  So I ended up not going to college right away and getting into a bad relationship because I didn't know how to take care of myself on my own.  I realize now that my dad deliberately wouldn't teach me or let my mom teach me anything as a form of abuse, because he wanted me to end up helpless.  He wouldn't even let my mom teach me how to cook.  My ex's grandma taught me how to peel a potato.  She was horrified that I didn't already know. 

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#18 of 18 Old 07-17-2013, 01:26 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EarthRootsStarSoul View Post
 

Things no one taught me but should have:  how to rent an apartment, buy a car, buy insurance, get utilities hooked up, manage money, have a job.  Also how to go to college.  I didn't know how to manage going to college, how to pay for it, manage my time and resources.  So I ended up not going to college right away and getting into a bad relationship because I didn't know how to take care of myself on my own.  I realize now that my dad deliberately wouldn't teach me or let my mom teach me anything as a form of abuse, because he wanted me to end up helpless.  He wouldn't even let my mom teach me how to cook.  My ex's grandma taught me how to peel a potato.  She was horrified that I didn't already know. 

That's a huge amount of deficit you had to get over! Well done!

 

I was kinda the opposite and learned way too young. My parents were quite old for the time for having young kids so they were just tired by the time us younger kids came along. They couldn't be arsed, so we learned everything really young from our older sisters and were managing the household and our younger brother by ourselves before we were double-digit age.

 

My relatives were horrified that I could cook a 3 course meal by the age of 8 ;) Too early or too late (or worse, not at all) is never a good thing.

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