Yearly Income Poll - Mothering Forums
View Poll Results: What is your annual household income?
Less than $20,000 6 7.23%
$20,000 to $29,000 6 7.23%
$30,000 to $39,000 7 8.43%
$40,000 to $49,000 12 14.46%
$50,000 to $59,000 8 9.64%
$60,000 to $69,000 6 7.23%
$70,000 to $79,000 4 4.82%
$80,000 to $89,000 7 8.43%
$90,000 to $99,000 4 4.82%
Over $100,000 23 27.71%
Voters: 83. You may not vote on this poll

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 28 Old 08-15-2013, 05:53 AM - Thread Starter
Administrator
 
cynthia mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: An Arabian kingdom far far away
Posts: 28,886
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 81 Post(s)

There seems to be an assumption about parents who live an attachment parenting and natural family living lifestyle that they are well-to-do, making it easy for them to afford the expense of their choices. I get the feeling that's not really the truth, that many are in the middle or lower income levels and having to really budget and make careful choices to afford some of their parenting goals. 

 

Back in 2007, an income poll in the Stay at Home Parents forum showed that 19% of members who voted  make over $100,000 per year. Another in 2010 found 23% make over $95,000. 

 

Is this true today and for everyone (not just stay at home mom families)? What is your family's yearly income?


cynthia mosher is offline  
#2 of 28 Old 08-15-2013, 11:13 PM
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 3,351
Mentioned: 58 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)

Wow!, interesting figures. We are on a teacher's salary and we budget, budget did I say budget? We also use credit cards that we always pay at the end of the month so that we can earn points. This might sound like an advertising ad but American Express has a blue card that gives 6% back on groceries and since we spend over $500 a month well, you can do the math.

abiyhayil likes this.
tracyamber is offline  
#3 of 28 Old 08-15-2013, 11:54 PM
 
katelove's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Australia
Posts: 3,753
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Are we talking before tax or take home?

Mother of two spectacular girls, born mid-2010 and late 2012  mdcblog5.gif

katelove is online now  
#4 of 28 Old 08-16-2013, 07:25 AM
 
Catwmandu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Central New Jersey
Posts: 407
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Interesting - we need to learn how to budget and stick to it. We are strapped at most times with my husband being a SAHD and number 3 being on the way.

Catwmandu is offline  
#5 of 28 Old 08-16-2013, 09:27 AM
 
ocelotmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: "I drove through there once!", NV
Posts: 1,693
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)

It's a little baffling because so much of what is AP, environmental friendly, etc. is also the most frugal option. I wonder how much of this perception has to do with MDC's advertising, which tends to represent products on the more expensive end of the spectrum? This isn't meant as criticism - I know that something is necessary to cover expenses.

 

It also seems like there's an assumption that requires a stay at home parent.

 

Our current income is on the higher end of the poll, but it certainly hasn't always been that way - we've been dirt poor through most of my time as a parent.


DS born 6/03, DD1 born 9/06, DD2 born 10/10, DD3 born 4/14.
ocelotmom is offline  
#6 of 28 Old 08-16-2013, 09:42 AM
 
sewchris2642's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: San Diego county, CA
Posts: 1,384
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I used last year's tax information.  My income fluctuates between a summer high and a winter low.  In part because we home school and I work at home.  But my busy time is during the summer so it all works out.  Dh took a big hit in hours this summer for 2 months but he is now back up to full time.  I'm not sure how AP can figure into income however.  It all depends on the definition of AP.  I've been told that I'm not AP because I didn't co-sleep with my 2nd dd and let her fuss herself to sleep alone in a darkened room.  She also didn't like being held.  She was in a stroller until she could be carried in a Gerry back pack around 6-8 months.  What can I say?  That's what she wanted and needed.  I listened to her needs which is AP.  On the other hand, our son was in our bed for over 2 years and in our room for 4.  He was also held/carried for much of his first 2 years.  We all celebrated his first word at age two--"down".


Chris--extended breastfeeding, cloth diapering, babywearing, co-sleeping, APing, CLW, homeschooling before any of this was a trend mom to Joy (1/78), Erica (8/80), Angela (9/84), Dylan (2/98)
sewchris2642 is offline  
#7 of 28 Old 08-16-2013, 08:26 PM
 
newmamalizzy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 1,555
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)

I'd be interested to see an "income minus childcare" poll, too. TBH, I feel like we're really well off, maybe because we can actually afford all our bills these days, and that certainly hasn't always been the case for me.  I can't even imagine what we'll be able to do when I start earning again!  Oh, uh, what student loans?

newmamalizzy is offline  
#8 of 28 Old 08-17-2013, 08:18 AM
 
Chloe'sMama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Fresno
Posts: 3,146
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)

While the numbers are interesting, it doesn't take into account the cost of living in your area.  $100,000 in CA doesn't go nearly as far as someplace with lower COL..... 


SAHM to Chloe«- 6/2008 (10 lbs, 5 oz), Hannah- 9/2010 (9 lbs, 12 oz), Liam- 2/2013 (9 lbs, 6 oz)

Chloe'sMama is offline  
#9 of 28 Old 08-17-2013, 09:03 AM
 
sewchris2642's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: San Diego county, CA
Posts: 1,384
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chloe'sMama View Post

While the numbers are interesting, it doesn't take into account the cost of living in your area.  $100,000 in CA doesn't go nearly as far as someplace with lower COL..... 


True.  We just hit the 40,000 mark last year.  If this poll had been taken a year ago, we would have been within the 30,000 to 39,000 level.  All of Dylan's elementary school years, he qualified for the free lunch program at school.  Just about half of dh's monthly income goes to rent. 


Chris--extended breastfeeding, cloth diapering, babywearing, co-sleeping, APing, CLW, homeschooling before any of this was a trend mom to Joy (1/78), Erica (8/80), Angela (9/84), Dylan (2/98)
sewchris2642 is offline  
#10 of 28 Old 08-17-2013, 02:36 PM
 
ocelotmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: "I drove through there once!", NV
Posts: 1,693
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chloe'sMama View Post

While the numbers are interesting, it doesn't take into account the cost of living in your area.  $100,000 in CA doesn't go nearly as far as someplace with lower COL..... 

It doesn't take into account number of people in the family, either.
Catwmandu likes this.

DS born 6/03, DD1 born 9/06, DD2 born 10/10, DD3 born 4/14.
ocelotmom is offline  
#11 of 28 Old 08-18-2013, 09:29 AM
 
grahamsmom98's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 2,300
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)

Us:  Over $100,000 annual income (pension + investments).  We have never had a set budget, but don't blow money needlessly.  Credit card is paid, in full, each month.  No debts whatsoever (house is mortgage-free).

 

Ages:  me: 54; dh: 58; ds: 14.  Married 17 years.

 

Dh is retired.  I have always been a sahm.  We homeschool.  2 cars, large house on over 100 acres in an area with a relatively low cost of living..

 

We have a college trust for ds which will afford him any choice for higher education.

grahamsmom98 is offline  
#12 of 28 Old 09-02-2013, 03:04 PM
 
thatgirliknew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 509
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

We've been right around $20,000 a year for the last 6 years or so. For a family of 3 or 4. Granted, I live in a relatively low cost of living area, but making "natural" and AP choices are what saved me as much money and allowed me to get by with what we had.


treehugger.gif Mom to jammin.gifDS7 and Peace.gifDD4.  Full time Social Work studentgeek.gif.
thatgirliknew is offline  
#13 of 28 Old 09-05-2013, 04:43 AM
 
Oread's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 171
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Something to keep in mind though as well is that yearly income isn't always a great representation of socioeconomic status. For example, this year our income is only going to be like $14,000 but that doesn't take into account my background - I'm college educated and so are my parents. We're on a pretty tight budget, but I'm not starting from zero like many other low income people - my parents gave me a car, and household items, and help us out with expensive projects. We've always had good healthcare, access to transportation, and so on. 

 

"Natural" living stuff doesn't necessarily need to be expensive, but it does often require an upfront investment that many people in poverty really can't, not to mention the time and access to information. We are low income but my choices haven't been limited as much as other people in my income bracket. It would be my guess that even if lots of AP/natural parents are low income, they aren't in poverty and they are from financially stable families with access to decent education.

dbsam likes this.
Oread is offline  
#14 of 28 Old 09-08-2013, 09:18 AM
 
SweetSilver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Westfarthing
Posts: 4,959
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cynthia Mosher View Post
 

There seems to be an assumption about parents who live an attachment parenting and natural family living lifestyle that they are well-to-do, making it easy for them to afford the expense of their choices. I get the feeling that's not really the truth, that many are in the middle or lower income levels and having to really budget and make careful choices to afford some of their parenting goals. 

Well, on the surface in this small survey, it looks like the top incomes have the most respondents.  But I'm not really sure where people get the idea that to be natural, you have to have money.  Sure, if you want to buy those expensive all-organic mattresses, organic bedding, etc.  The only thing that costs us more is our food, and that is mainly because my allergies prevent me from making more vegetarian options, and preferences keep me from buying a side of local beef to freeze.  But what makes the biggest difference is our low housing cost.

 

I answered in the 20,000+ range, but our net income is closer to 19,000 or less, and our taxable income ranges from 11,000 to 14,000 (we are self-employed).

 

Quote:
 It would be my guess that even if lots of AP/natural parents are low income, they aren't in poverty and they are from financially stable families with access to decent education.

For us, what helps is that we've had some good financial luck that, yes, began with some family help.  ILs help dh buy a house in Seattle in 1988.  He bought out their portion, and we sold the house for an obscene profit in 2006, allowing us to put a huge down payment on a house near our property.  That lowered our mortgage.  Having enough of a reliable income (though very low) allowed us to keep up with credit card payments and we were able to refinance recently, lowering payments even more.  Our cars are used and paid in full (thanks to a refinance years before).  Those together make our yearly income livable.

 

But they aren't the only choices that make a difference.  We have internet and a basic phone and bare-bones cell service (one phone), but no smart phone, no cable or satellite TV.  I don't subscribe to magazines or buy books.  I use the library extensively.  Our entertainment expenses are very low.  We don't travel far, and in that regard we are fortunate to have family close by.  We buy used as much as possible.  We keep spending on lessons as low as we can.  We are unschoolers, so no big investment in curriculum.  We also don't spend a lot in veterinary care.  And we could do better still, with some tweaking.  DSHS pays for the girls insurance.  The only unfortunate part of the income picture is that dh and I were dropped off subsidized insurance due to an inheritance, and I haven't visited the dentist in a while.  We are still working out some income issues, but I'm not really sure how NFP needs to be dependent upon income, with the exception of groceries which, despite what some people say, can easily be far more expensive than conventional, especially if one parent can't stay home for whatever reason.  (Yes, conventional can be expensive, but if I had a non-organic whole foods diet, that would be extra cheap!)

 

I'm curious how other people manage to make "natural" choices on a tight (or non-existant) budget, or if they've really had to make "sacrifices".  And for those on the higher income scale, do you think that it allows you to make some of the choices you wouldn't have otherwise?


Give me a few minutes while I caffeinate.
SweetSilver is offline  
#15 of 28 Old 09-08-2013, 10:05 AM
 
newmamalizzy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 1,555
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
I feel like earning a bit more helped me make more NFP type choices because it freed up mental space for me to MAKE choices. I was so stressed all the time with a new baby and low income that I often felt like I couldn't think straight. We earn about $50,000 now and I feel like we have so much, so many options, and even enough to deal with unexpected expenses, like the schnazzy new transmission we just got greensad.gif.
abiyhayil likes this.
newmamalizzy is offline  
#16 of 28 Old 09-08-2013, 10:35 AM
 
abiyhayil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 775
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We are living on a teacher's salary, we are a little desperate atm and are reapplying for WIC. After mortgage (on a townhonme) utilities, Internet, gas and insurance we have about 350 left for groceries each month.
tracyamber likes this.

><> Mom to superhero.gif (6) hearts.gif (4) energy.gif (2) and baby.gif (born March!)
abiyhayil is offline  
#17 of 28 Old 09-09-2013, 08:01 PM
 
colsxjack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Toronto
Posts: 633
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by SweetSilver View Post
I'm curious how other people manage to make "natural" choices on a tight (or non-existant) budget, or if they've really had to make "sacrifices".  And for those on the higher income scale, do you think that it allows you to make some of the choices you wouldn't have otherwise?

 

We make over $100,000 dollars. But we also live in a very high COL area. We have three young children and a home that needs extensive renovations that we are doing bit by bit as we save money to cover the costs.

BUT...we also live in Canada, and so have health care covered, as well as I have an excellent health benefits package through my work. So we are able to utilize both western medicine and alternative medical care almost as much as we would like.

 

Having a higher income does allow us to make choices that we wouldn't otherwise make.

We can afford higher priced foods and more organic foods.

We can afford to buy more natural mattresses that limit off gassing of chemicals.

We can afford to utilize the full 12 month maternity leave offered. (In Canada you have a right to 12 months maternity leave, but many cannot afford to do so because it is at about half of regular income).

We can afford to have choices in our childcare and have a nanny for our children between the ages of 1-3 yrs old.

We can afford to spend a little more on more natural toys.

 

We also make our budget stretch by buying almost everything used. 95% of our childrens clothes and about 50% of household items.

We save money by being natural. We cloth diaper and that saves LOTS of money. We breast feed. We use only vinegar and baking soda to clean most of the home. We do not use many scented products. We line dry clothing a lot.

 

So, having money has helped us to live more naturally. And living more naturally allows us to save money on some things.


Me 40 eat.gif. Partner to mamacolleen 33 superhero.gif. DD born July 2009 blahblah.gif. Twin boys born Nov 2012.

We are a family that loves cold.giftreehugger.giffamilybed1.giffemalesling.GIFcd.gif

colsxjack is offline  
#18 of 28 Old 09-11-2013, 01:44 PM
 
USAmma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Arizona
Posts: 18,846
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

When I was a SAHM I gave up a good job and cut our income in half. It was so worth it, but very hard at times to cope with unexpected expenses. After the kids started school, I started to work again. I'm now part time and we are more comfortable financially. There is a certain stress that a person carries when they don't have a good financial base that can affect parenting.


7yo: "Mom,I know which man is on a quarter and which on is on a nickel. They both have ponytails, but one man has a collar and the other man is naked. The naked man was our first president."
 
USAmma is offline  
#19 of 28 Old 09-15-2013, 11:41 AM
 
MichelleZB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 966
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)

We make around $40,000 combined with both of us working. So we also pay for childcare, a good $8000 a year or so. Annual family income doesn't mean everything--some people make the $40k with just one parent, leaving the other to be able to do childcare without further spending.

 

I have always been perplexed about why AP-style parenting is considered privileged. Many of the parenting things are cheaper: breastfeeding is free, basically, cloth diapering saves lots of money, and so does relying less on pop culture and "stuff".

MichelleZB is offline  
#20 of 28 Old 09-17-2013, 01:55 PM
 
Storm Bride's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 27,300
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I've been in all these brackets while living an AP (didn't call it that for most of it, as I'd never heard the term), NFL lifestyle. Honestly, I lived more naturally when I had less money. DH and I prefer not to discuss our income publicly these days, but we're doing pretty well, financially. I don't understand why this is considered a privileged, high income lifestyle, though....the only really expensive aspect I can think of is food, if people are buying a lot of specialty items and organics and whatever. Even then, cooking style, portions, etc. can make those choices much less costly.


Lisa, lucky mama of Kelly (3/93) ribboncesarean.gif, Emma (5/03) ribboncesarean.gif, Evan (7/05) ribboncesarean.gif, & Jenna (6/09) ribboncesarean.gif
Loving my amazing dh, James & forever missing ribbonpb.gif Aaron Ambrose ribboncesarean.gif (11/07) ribbonpb.gif

Storm Bride is offline  
#21 of 28 Old 09-18-2013, 12:23 AM
 
Dela's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 89
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Over 100k. We've lived a privileged life. I've been a SAHM since my first was born but have always had passive forms of income, ie rental properties, horse boarding, investments.

 

Most AP parents I've known are well-to-do. I think the stereotype has a good bit of truth to it. Personally I think it's more because AP parents (in my experience and because it makes logical sense) are more likely to be higher income because they are more likely to be educated, and I think educated people are more likely to AP.

 

Educated parents are more likely to breastfeed; more likely to choose organic/healthier food; less likely to use corporal punishment, and I'm sure a variety of other practices that jive with AP/natural living.


Peaceful, homeschooling, UC/HBing, select vaxing, breastfeeding, intactivist mama to a bunch of small people.

Dela is offline  
#22 of 28 Old 09-18-2013, 05:40 AM
 
motherhendoula's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: LawnGuyLand
Posts: 749
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

We are over 90K a year - and that is a NYC teachers salary!  (plus a second job)  - with DH working two jobs  during the school year - i am still a SAHM and LO is 3 yrs old.  I assume i will start working again part time next year - we do have a universal Pre K and a very reasonable 'drop in babysitting service'  in our town (the kids can be bussed from Pre K for an extra hour or two to allow for a typical 4 hour shift somewhere.

I have met a wide variety of AP parents - many (in my area specifically) are well educated, high earning, AP parents - but i also know many in more  who dont earn much and thats why AP appeals to them (well maybe)  - you dont need to buy formula, cribs, diapers, baby swings and playthings ....a good carrier and used cloth diapers and your all set!  - the big issue of organic food - i have seen  - solved by planting a decent garden - i have seen this in the city as well as rural areas - i think thats a huge expense for many AP families - unless you can find a good co-op nearby - high quality food can be pricey!   


Happy at Home Mama to DD 4/95 DS 4/98 and DS#2 8/10  femalesling.GIF        h20homebirth.gif       sewmachine.gif

http://www.etsy.com/shop/motherhendoula
 

motherhendoula is offline  
#23 of 28 Old 09-18-2013, 09:03 AM
 
mumm's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 1,605
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Your annual income alone doesn't say much about your socioeconomic status.  100k where I live qualifies a family of 5 for low income housing. 

Mama Metis likes this.

Me.  With 1 spouse, 4 kids, 16 chickens, 74 matchbox cars, 968,562+ legos, a dishwasher waiting to be emptied, a washing machine waiting to be filled and a lost cup of tea in the house.

mumm is offline  
#24 of 28 Old 09-18-2013, 10:53 AM
 
Storm Bride's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 27,300
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mumm View Post
 

Your annual income alone doesn't say much about your socioeconomic status.  100k where I live qualifies a family of 5 for low income housing. 

 

This is a really good point. Cost of living varies so wildly from one place to another. DH has a friend who owns two properties (both single-family detached houses, on fairly large lots), and rents one of them out. His combined mortgage payments on both of them come to less than dh and I pay in rent on an old townhouse (I think it's called a row house in some areas) in a less than wonderful neighbourhood. (It's not awful, or crime ridden, although we've had some trouble recently - just not anything special.)

 

DH and his friend earn similar yearly incomes (his friend's wife and I are both SAHMs at the moment), but they have way more disposable income than we do. They pay far less for housing, and less for food, gas, etc. They have higher costs in a few areas, but the housing differential is so significant that it weights the balance a lot.


Lisa, lucky mama of Kelly (3/93) ribboncesarean.gif, Emma (5/03) ribboncesarean.gif, Evan (7/05) ribboncesarean.gif, & Jenna (6/09) ribboncesarean.gif
Loving my amazing dh, James & forever missing ribbonpb.gif Aaron Ambrose ribboncesarean.gif (11/07) ribbonpb.gif

Storm Bride is offline  
#25 of 28 Old 09-18-2013, 10:55 AM
 
Storm Bride's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 27,300
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dela View Post
 

Over 100k. We've lived a privileged life. I've been a SAHM since my first was born but have always had passive forms of income, ie rental properties, horse boarding, investments.

 

Most AP parents I've known are well-to-do. I think the stereotype has a good bit of truth to it. Personally I think it's more because AP parents (in my experience and because it makes logical sense) are more likely to be higher income because they are more likely to be educated, and I think educated people are more likely to AP.

 

Educated parents are more likely to breastfeed; more likely to choose organic/healthier food; less likely to use corporal punishment, and I'm sure a variety of other practices that jive with AP/natural living.

 

I always forget about this aspect. I didn't parent in an AP fashion due to education. I did it due to sheer bloody-mindedness. A lot of our default cultural attitudes about parenting just never made sense to me, so I didn't practice them. When ds1 (20) was a baby, I also defaulted to a lot of green practices, but that was mostly because I was raised with a low tolerance for waste. I was doing a lot of things (cloth diapering, reusing things, avoiding paper towel, etc.) because I felt they were less wasteful, not so much because I was being environmentally aware.


Lisa, lucky mama of Kelly (3/93) ribboncesarean.gif, Emma (5/03) ribboncesarean.gif, Evan (7/05) ribboncesarean.gif, & Jenna (6/09) ribboncesarean.gif
Loving my amazing dh, James & forever missing ribbonpb.gif Aaron Ambrose ribboncesarean.gif (11/07) ribbonpb.gif

Storm Bride is offline  
#26 of 28 Old 09-18-2013, 12:23 PM
 
Dela's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 89
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
 

 

I always forget about this aspect. I didn't parent in an AP fashion due to education. I did it due to sheer bloody-mindedness. A lot of our default cultural attitudes about parenting just never made sense to me, so I didn't practice them. When ds1 (20) was a baby, I also defaulted to a lot of green practices, but that was mostly because I was raised with a low tolerance for waste. I was doing a lot of things (cloth diapering, reusing things, avoiding paper towel, etc.) because I felt they were less wasteful, not so much because I was being environmentally aware.

 

 

I didn't say it was a rule or that there weren't exceptions, just that people who are educated or who are in a community with higher than average rates of education seem more often to lean towards AP and less wasteful/more environmentally conscious practices than do people who are less educated or who live in a lower educated demographic area.

 

I do believe and I know that many studies over the years have shown that education and more evolved practices are very much linked, but I never meant to imply that the two were absolutes or exclusive to each other, sorry if I gave that impression.


Peaceful, homeschooling, UC/HBing, select vaxing, breastfeeding, intactivist mama to a bunch of small people.

Dela is offline  
#27 of 28 Old 09-18-2013, 12:26 PM
 
Storm Bride's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 27,300
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dela View Post
 

 

 

I didn't say it was a rule or that there weren't exceptions, just that people who are educated or who are in a community with higher than average rates of education seem more often to lean towards AP and less wasteful/more environmentally conscious practices than do people who are less educated or who live in a lower educated demographic area.

 

I do believe and I know that many studies over the years have shown that education and more evolved practices are very much linked, but I never meant to imply that the two were absolutes or exclusive to each other, sorry if I gave that impression.

 

Oh, no - not at all. I was just observing that I tend to overlook that side of it. I'm sure there's a strong correlation between education and AP. I'm just always a little surprised by it, on some level.


Lisa, lucky mama of Kelly (3/93) ribboncesarean.gif, Emma (5/03) ribboncesarean.gif, Evan (7/05) ribboncesarean.gif, & Jenna (6/09) ribboncesarean.gif
Loving my amazing dh, James & forever missing ribbonpb.gif Aaron Ambrose ribboncesarean.gif (11/07) ribbonpb.gif

Storm Bride is offline  
#28 of 28 Old 09-24-2013, 12:16 PM
 
USAmma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Arizona
Posts: 18,846
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Reading the responses of this thread made me remember being part of AP groups where most of the people were well to do and I felt conscious about it in many ways. Part of the reason I went for the cloth diapers was because they were cheaper. I was part of a group where people bought organic everything, had beautiful hand-made slings and carriers, organic cloth diapers, were able to take cooking classes or send their kids to the best private preschools. There were a few who were like our family, where it was a big sacrifice to be a stay at home mom financially. I was sometimes embarrassed to invite people over to our smaller home. I shopped at Goodwill, bought things on sale that were not organic most of the time, and drove a very old car. The good moms never judged and those are my friends to this day. :-) 

 

I think being a SAHM is a dying "breed" amongst the middle class population. When I decided to go back to college and become a nurse to supplement my income, as well as for personal fulfillment, it really, really helped our family to afford things like piano lessons and hiring a gardener to maintain the yard. And to not stress as much when the old car needed repairs.


7yo: "Mom,I know which man is on a quarter and which on is on a nickel. They both have ponytails, but one man has a collar and the other man is naked. The naked man was our first president."
 
USAmma is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off