Do you let your child go UP the slide?? - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

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#31 of 92 Old 09-07-2013, 07:44 PM
 
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When its busy....if my daughter (who is 11) is climbing UP one of the slides, and someone climbs up to the top from the ladder....what does my daughter do when she gets to the top and now there is a kid and maybe a line of kids behind her waiting to go down? Push past them to go down the ladder? Turn around and slide down? Does the kid at the top wait til my daughter climbs up to the top or should my daughter jump down if she's halfway up?

 

I would think in that scenario your daughter should turn around at whatever point she is at and slide down so the next person can go. 

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#32 of 92 Old 09-08-2013, 01:20 AM
 
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Yes. When they were younger I had to tell them if some small kids were trying to come down they needed to stop climbing up until the others were finished. Now they are old enough to have the common sense to know when it is ok and when it isn't. Also, our slide ends in a dirty sandpit, along with everything else in the playground. Kids get dirty there, making mud pies or digging after treasure chests or whatever. My kids also put sand, even pour it, on the slide and then go down it. So do their friends. I let them do this too. On two occasions I got a dirty look from a parent who I guess were worried the slide would get dirty, and so would their kids. Hello, it is a play ground. If they don't get dirty on the slide, they are going to get dirty in the play house or on the spinning top or in the football field.... If you want spotless kids, don't take them to a playground. All summer kids are over in the play ground with bare feet and 3 foot long dirty fingernails. 

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#33 of 92 Old 09-08-2013, 04:59 AM
 
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Originally Posted by queenjane View Post
 

When its busy....if my daughter (who is 11) is climbing UP one of the slides, and someone climbs up to the top from the ladder....what does my daughter do when she gets to the top and now there is a kid and maybe a line of kids behind her waiting to go down? Push past them to go down the ladder? Turn around and slide down? Does the kid at the top wait til my daughter climbs up to the top or should my daughter jump down if she's halfway up?

 

I would think in that scenario your daughter should turn around at whatever point she is at and slide down so the next person can go. 

 

The bolded response is by erigeron. I agree and I think most 11 year olds have figured out how to handle stuff like that. When my girls were toddlers, I followed them around the playground and gave them guidance about being aware and considerate of other kids. By the time they were past the toddler stage, they were pretty adept about handling most of these situations pretty well on their own, with me sitting nearby and able to step in as needed.

 

queenjane, I imagine my now 13yo dd would be just as independent even supposing that I hadn't allowed her to climb the outsides of slides -- but the fact that I did allow her to certainly hasn't done her any harm.

 

Again, I think children are smarter than we give them credit for. Dd2, at age 8, isn't nearly the climber that dd1 was at her age -- and the other day I noticed dd2 watching one of her friends climbing up the outside of the slide and dd was talking to her while she was up there -- but she didn't feel compelled to attempt it herself. Her sister was going up there by age 4 or 5. And just because I don't think my 8yo has the coordination yet to do stuff like that -- that doesn't mean I don't think other kids should be allowed to do it. Maybe some kids do feel pressured to try stuff they're not ready for just because they see a more coordinated kid doing it - but that is where we need to encourage our kids to listen to their own bodies and use their own good sense.

 

Life would get really boring, and also really dysfunctional, really fast if everyone started limiting themselves to what the youngest and/or least physically-coordinated people were capable of doing. Not to mention if all the physicists were to quit doing their thing because most of us don't understand physics. :)


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#34 of 92 Old 09-08-2013, 08:27 AM
 
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My girls have always been very mindful of the playground rules we create.  We, too, have a "down-slide has the right-of-way" rule, and no going up if there are a lot of kids.  Unlike other folks, I also let them climb up covered slides, but we are homeschoolers and we often have the park to ourselves, so that's my reason.

 

However, if I had a child who had a hard time internalizing rules are are dependent upon a particular scenario, then I would stick with "down only".  As kids get older, I don't want to be assessing the situation for them endlessly, and with my girls I don't have to.  But I can imagine that some post-toddler kids might have a harder time remembering to take the time to decide and possibly rely on me more to know whether it's OK or not (I don't mean kids that are simply slower to pick these nuances up, in which case I'd like to help, I mean the kids who seem to have zero concept of nuances, and no sign that they care).  Then I think I'd have more black-and-white rules.


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#35 of 92 Old 09-08-2013, 09:10 AM
 
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I agree and I think most 11 year olds have figured out how to handle stuff like that. When my girls were toddlers, I followed them around the playground and gave them guidance about being aware and considerate of other kids. By the time they were past the toddler stage, they were pretty adept about handling most of these situations pretty well on their own, with me sitting nearby and able to step in as needed.

 

queenjane, I imagine my now 13yo dd would be just as independent even supposing that I hadn't allowed her to climb the outsides of slides -- but the fact that I did allow her to certainly hasn't done her any harm.

 

Again, I think children are smarter than we give them credit for. Dd2, at age 8, isn't nearly the climber that dd1 was at her age -- and the other day I noticed dd2 watching one of her friends climbing up the outside of the slide and dd was talking to her while she was up there -- but she didn't feel compelled to attempt it herself. Her sister was going up there by age 4 or 5. And just because I don't think my 8yo has the coordination yet to do stuff like that -- that doesn't mean I don't think other kids should be allowed to do it. Maybe some kids do feel pressured to try stuff they're not ready for just because they see a more coordinated kid doing it - but that is where we need to encourage our kids to listen to their own bodies and use their own good sense.

 

Life would get really boring, and also really dysfunctional, really fast if everyone started limiting themselves to what the youngest and/or least physically-coordinated people were capable of doing. Not to mention if all the physicists were to quit doing their thing because most of us don't understand physics. :)

 

:eyesroll

 

Obviously an 11 yr old can figure that out. MY 11 yr old usually has a trail of younger kids behind her so its not just her. 

 

Somehow i'm defending "not allowing climbing up slides" when in my initial post in this thread i said that if the park isnt busy, its no big deal. If it can be done safely and not interfere with kids coming down the slide, no big deal. (Around here when the park is very busy there may be a constant stream of kids coming DOWN the slides so going up wont really work because you couldnt get to the top before there is someone wanting to come down.) 

 

However what i take issue with is this idea that if a parent discourages it that somehow they are thwarting child's creativity, standing in the way of their developing independence and zest for freedom, they are even encouraging couch-potato mentality in their child if the kid can't do it...heck, its not even very supportive of poor people. And now those darn uncreative parents are even responsible for impeding progress in the world of physics! who knew?! :wink

 

The one thing i took issue with was the poster who said she was at the park and a bunch of parents were standing around half-heartedly telling their kids to stop climbing up the slide. Which i dont get. If you dont mind them climbing up dont tell them not to. And if you DO mind them climbing up, you tell them not to, and they dont listen....what the heck?! My kid would be sitting next to me on the bench for awhile or we'd leave if he couldnt follow my directions whether it was "dont climb up the slide" or "dont throw woodchips" or anything else. 

 

I dunno i guess i dont feel like being cognizant of little ones around you and not leading them astray is being "limiting" but rather kind and being a role model. Do i always ask the older children to not do something so the little ones won't want to? No of course not. But there certainly is a time and place for it. And i DO view the park as being primarily for the little ones (and i know you would disagree with that mammal_mama based on what you've written here)...sometimes we go to a park closeby but lately have been avoiding it because a large group of young teens (maybe 11-14) have been hanging out there and recently i got into a bit of an argument with the two oldest rude kids who thought it was cool to be mean to a little kid. I know its hard for kids in that age group to find stuff to do or places to be but its not always great when a group of five or six teens are just camped out on the play equipment talking (sometimes swearing or being otherwise inappropriate) either. 


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#36 of 92 Old 09-08-2013, 09:28 AM
 
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And i DO view the park as being primarily for the little ones ...sometimes we go to a park closeby but lately have been avoiding it because a large group of young teens (maybe 11-14) have been hanging out there and recently i got into a bit of an argument with the two oldest rude kids who thought it was cool to be mean to a little kid. I know its hard for kids in that age group to find stuff to do or places to be but its not always great when a group of five or six teens are just camped out on the play equipment talking (sometimes swearing or being otherwise inappropriate) either. 

I agree that the big toys at parks are not designed for older kids, and they need to be more cognizant of both little kids and the play equipment.  Big kids can do a number on the equipment, and most of the replacement at our local playground is from older kids using the equipment in ways it was not designed.  One slide, for example, was cracked because the big kids were (drumroll.....) climbing up the slide.  All it takes is one fall on one knee on a plastic slide by a 13 yo and that slide can be toast.

 

However, that said, hopefully most kids that age have a bit more consideration.... something I think they show better individually than they do in packs.


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#37 of 92 Old 09-08-2013, 09:52 AM
 
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The one thing i took issue with was the poster who said she was at the park and a bunch of parents were standing around half-heartedly telling their kids to stop climbing up the slide. Which i dont get. If you dont mind them climbing up dont tell them not to. And if you DO mind them climbing up, you tell them not to, and they dont listen....what the heck?! My kid would be sitting next to me on the bench for awhile or we'd leave if he couldnt follow my directions whether it was "dont climb up the slide" or "dont throw woodchips" or anything else. 

 

That was me. I explained the situation further in my other post. If I was really concerned my daughter was going to get hurt, of course I'd remove her from the area, but I didn't think that was the situation. At another play area we go to, I have repeatedly had to remove her from playing at the bottom of the slide because kids come down that one fast. I don't really see the value of putting a 2-year-old in time out. And not everyone who was there could watch their kid every second, particularly as most of the other moms had more than one kid. So they were trying to keep their kids from climbing the slide, but then their kids would climb the slide when they were on the other side of the play area tending to the other kid. I wasn't trying to keep my daughter from climbing the slide when everyone else was; I told her instead that she needed to watch for people coming down. I'm satisfied with my approach to the situation. So far it has worked for us. Some people probably think I'm too hands-off and they can think that if they want. 

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#38 of 92 Old 09-08-2013, 01:12 PM
 
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queenjane, I've no idea whether kids who aren't allowed to climb up the slide or up the outside of the slide end up being less creative or more couch-potatoey than they otherwise would have been. I was just saying that my own children have had the option and it hasn't harmed them any, and they also haven't harmed other people by exercising their freedom.

 

And I do realize that much of the equipment on many playgrounds has been designed with much smaller kids in mind -- but I think the parks themselves are for the whole community, as we all pay the taxes to support them.

 

Yet, I also feel for your experience with the rude teenagers. We had a park we enjoyed that we eventually decided it wasn't worth going to because it seemed to attract more gangish sorts of groups, who took exception to the fact that my oldest, then 11, still liked to play and sometimes got dirty; the girls in the cliques who were close to dd's age saw that sort of thing as "childish."

 

It's weird, because the other neighborhood park we now frequent is about the same distance from us as the other one, so in the same part of town and all, but for some reason, the kids at this park seem to always be accompanied by parents whereas the ones at gang-central tend to go on their own. While there are some teens who come to the good park on their own (including my own dd who likes to walk our dog there and sometimes hang out with friends), there are generally always lots of adults around, which seems to discourage the gang stuff.

 

We really enjoy the good park now, but sometimes feel sad about the other one. We did try going back a few times and at first it seemed like it would be better because the former gang was no longer there, what with so many families moving and so on, but within a short time we saw that there were others that had taken their place.

 

And I really do feel like parks are for teens, too, including the difficult ones. But I think you need a lot of adults hanging around to make it work.


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#39 of 92 Old 09-08-2013, 02:22 PM - Thread Starter
 
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They play equipment at the closest park to me has a sign up that says it's designed for ages 5 to 12, but most of the kids on it are under 5. That seems common here and in the place I lived a little while ago. I don't know how common that is everywhere, but I don't agree that play equipment on parks is generally for younger kids. I've seen both the equipment for ages 5 to 12, AND another pice of equipment for kids under 5. But it seems like all the kids of all ages seem to like the equipment designed for older kids. And, to be fair, my 11-year-old isn't that interested in it anymore and I do think they might be overshooting in the ages they put down on the signs, maybe to limit liability. Like so if a 3-year-old gets hurt they can say, "Hey in the SIGN it clearly says it's for kids between 5 and 12" when almost everyone on it is a toddler.
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#40 of 92 Old 09-08-2013, 05:59 PM
 
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I really don't think we're in any danger of stifling our kids' creativity. There are sometimes rules. Maybe my "no climbing up the slide" rule seems too much to some, but most of the time we're sliding down this slide:

We also don't whittle with knives at the park or set fires with our magnifying glasses, but those things are okay at home. I feel it's best to have no climbing up the slide be a full time rule, because there are so many other things to climb up. None of my children has ever complained except when other kids have been in the way when they are trying to slide down.

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#41 of 92 Old 09-08-2013, 09:01 PM
 
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I think that part of whether or not its safe relates to who many other kids are trying to use the slide at the same time. I work at school, and you can only play on the slide by going up the ladder and  down the slide (on your bottom, feet first.) It might seems like overkill, but we have kids get hurt pretty much every day in one way or another on the playground, so we've ruled out the actions that caused the most injuries as well as the ways of playing that resulted in others not being able to play.

 

Swings can only go back and forth in a straight line -- no going from side to side.

 

Since all the children follow these rules, more children can PLAY and fewer end up in the nurses office.

 

When my kids were little and I took them to the park, and there were just a handful of kids there, I let them do whatever they wanted. It felt really odd when I first started enforcing the rules at school, but now I've spent enough time on the playground -- when 100 kids are being monitored by 5 adults -- to see the reason for the rules.


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#42 of 92 Old 09-08-2013, 11:46 PM
 
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No. I am British. For us, its a slippery slope then to queue (line?) jumping and jaywalking. :rotflmao. Honestly you might as well train a kid to rob a bank.


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#43 of 92 Old 09-08-2013, 11:54 PM
 
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ok seriously? Yeah, if they are the only kids in the playground (weather-proof homeschoolers so that's not unusual). No, if other kids are vaguely nearby.

 

It IS a thing in British culture not to do stuff like this and I think it might make other kids feel they couldn't use the equipment. Obviously if you have younger kids that might be different-mine are 5, 8 and 10 and play together quite exuberantly, and so we do have to be a bit aware of not colonising spaces. But its easy for us to use a park when no one else is there, at least in term time.


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#44 of 92 Old 09-09-2013, 02:26 AM
 
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I think the real place this becomes an issue is where you have a kid of whatever age who won't get out of the way. We get that from time to time. Usually a toddler, with a fierce parent, protecting their right to walk super slowly up the slide and hold up a whole queue of kids at the top. Or the parent who gets annoyed because their kid started climbing up the slide and got knocked off by someone coming down. Not such an issue now my kids are older but I wan't really ever prepared to monitor my kids to check that they checked for kids coming up the slide. I do tell them to do it-its hardly right that a little kid gets hurt because their parents aren't being responsible- but they are kids and I have younger ones to supervise.

 

I think as another poster said, right of way to the kids at the top. 

 

If the question is more, is there a universal law that says don't go up the slide, then no. Its a bit like an escalator. In the UK we have an unwritten law that on escalators you stand on the right. Actually I think its even written now on the Tube but it used to be something that everyone just knew. If you stand in the wrong place, people will tut you and give you a hard British stare of polite death, but also, sometimes it is actually dangerous as people just aren't expecting you to be on the left. You could get knocked flying and some of our escalators are many tens of metres down.  

 

But if you are the only one on an escalator, as often happens in the daytime, that's your call. My kids are Londoners enough that they can manage to stand on the left on the escalator when there's no one else around and know by instinct to stand on the right if anyone is nearby. BUT they also know to be much more alert if they are going to break this rule.


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#45 of 92 Old 09-09-2013, 05:55 AM
 
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Fillyjonk, I absolutely loved riding the Tube in London, there's no thrill like it, and it honestly doesn't seem even remotely fun to me to walk against the flow of traffic in a crowded public place such as a London train station. During my month in London, I just loved the upbeat, fast-paced feeling of flowing rapidly along with the crowd down the stairs and then shooting along though those tunnels under the streets of London. Doing anything to hinder that rapid flow would be a real downer. For me, the high...the surge of adrenaline, came from following the rules and staying in sync with the program.

 

I guess going against that flow could be fun, though, to people carrying out social experiments like the ones my 13yo currently likes to watch on YouTube. There was one experiment where they had a group of people working for them who all turned to face the back of the elevator, just to see if the lone individuals who weren't in on the experiment would eventually do the counterintuitive thing and turn to face the back, too. I think they all did.

 

But I don't think climbing up the slide is really counterintuitive, at least in the U.S., considering that so many toddlers just automatically start trying it out on their own. And it lets you use entire muscle groups that you don't get to use sliding down. Of course, I can definitely see that in situations like the one Linda described, in which 100 children are sharing the same play space, climbing up the slide would be somewhat tantamount to walking up the escalator on the same side where everyone is coming down. I can see how dangerous that could be.

 

But at the playgrounds where my children and I go, a "crowded playground" might have 20 children -- nowhere near 100. So there really aren't the same issues at play.


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#46 of 92 Old 09-09-2013, 07:59 AM
 
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ok this is the part i dont get...

 

why cant we have a slide - make it safer with hand rails - to go UP in. 

 

the moment a kid knows how to go down teh slide, be confident in it, they start climbing up. i've seen that with dd and with the umpteen no. of kids i've seen trying to go up the slide. 

 

there is no other climbing structure that lets you go up a 'hill' like the slide does. most everything is pretty vertical like a climbing gym (where really its not about legs) or a low gradient log structure. and honestly with dd and with other kids i've seen, climbing up has been more fun than down. i've never seen kids laugh and giggle so much as they tried to go up, figure out how to stop slipping. in fact i've seen some of the older toddler think of how to problem solve and figure out bare feet is easier to go up, or hold on to sides or its ok to go half way up and then slide down on your tummy. 

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#47 of 92 Old 09-09-2013, 11:14 AM
 
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So in the US there's no unwritten rule about not climbing up slides? Is it as acceptable to go up as down?

 

I do think part of the issue in the UK is probably that its easier to queue at the top than the bottom.


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#48 of 92 Old 09-09-2013, 11:22 AM
 
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I'm in urban northern California, and yes there is that unwritten 'rule.' But like all unwritten rules (and many written ones) it is not always followed.

 

We also stand to the right of an escalator, while those walking up/down do so on the left. This is most obvious in rapid transit stations, but you still run into those who don't know or don't care. 

Another I can think of is allowing those in an elevator to disembark before you enter it. 

FWIW, my kids know how to use the escalators politely. Just a basic life skill. 


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#49 of 92 Old 09-09-2013, 11:41 AM
 
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It sounds like in some very heavily populated urban areas, there is a lot of queueing for slides and the atmosphere in parks is similar to that of the London Tube during rush hour. I can see, then, why some are likening allowing one's child to climb up the slide to allowing one's child to do things like run up the "down" escalator.

 

I live in the urban Midwest, and we simply don't have the kinds of crowding I've experienced while traveling in London or, more recently, in Macau and Hong Kong (I say "more recently" but it was really many years ago, while London was many, many more years ago, LOL). I can see how this basic cultural difference can make it sound like those of us who don't follow every unwritten rule are raising kids who will be ill-prepared to get along in the world.

 

There are just so many different microcosms of the world. I think we're each doing what we feel is best given the situations we find ourselves in.


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#50 of 92 Old 09-09-2013, 11:48 AM
 
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I think thats a god point actually. MammaL was it you who said something about "only" 20 kids in a playground? in the majority of our playgrounds, that's getting a bit crowded! My local playground, which has a marvelous huge slide actually built out of the landscaping, can probably take around 10-15 kids before you really do get seriously crowded. 

 

I think there is agreement, isn't there, that if a playground is not crowded its fine and if kids are waiting to go down its not fine?


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#51 of 92 Old 09-09-2013, 12:07 PM
 
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Yes, I think everyone who lets their child go up the slide agrees on that point! :)


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#52 of 92 Old 09-09-2013, 02:35 PM
 
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Also, I'm not so great with numbers, but I suppose 20 on most playgrounds here could be fairly crowded, depending on whether all the kids are concentrated on the actual play equipment or some are playing with balls and Frisbees, or playing tag and hide and seek and so on, at the periphery.

 

So there can actually be a really huge amount of kids and families around, but they move in and out of the playground area, and I'd say that it's fairly rare at most parks in my city to see children lined up waiting to go down the slide. It's more common for a child who's climbing up to encounter one or two children sliding down or waiting to slide down, and just to turn around and slide on down and get out of the way. No big deal.

 

One park we frequent actually has three slides, all coming down from the same structure, two side by side and one on the other side. So someone wanting to slide down will usually pick one that doesn't have any climbers.


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#53 of 92 Old 09-10-2013, 07:57 AM
 
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20 kids on the playground here is unheard of except at schools-- and that includes the surrounding park, not just the equipment.  

 

There is the unspoken rule here that down has the right-of-way.  I have only heard one mother tell her son he couldn't climb up the slide in the empty-except-us playground (I wondered what she thought of me?) but her son could have been one of those 4yo with no "gray areas" that let him appreciate that one situation calls for a different set of rules than another.

 

But then there's often "that" kid that keeps climbing up and sliding down in front of kids.  I hate it when kids sneak in a quick up-down when there is someone waiting, thinking that if they are fast enough they can sneak in a turn!  (That kid would be a good candidate for more black-and-white rules!)  However, I have no reservations about gently reminding someone else's kids about the rules if his parent has their attention somewhere else.  Usually that's enough, and we can all enjoy up-slide or down without conflict or collisions.


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#54 of 92 Old 09-10-2013, 08:34 AM
 
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complete aside but why is 20 kids unheard of? Is it because you guys have lots of playgrounds? Or because kids don't tend to go to the playgrounds?

 

I think in cities in the UK we probably have some sort of playground at least every mile, except perhaps in areas where kids really don't tend to live (student housing areas, for example).


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#55 of 92 Old 09-10-2013, 08:43 AM
 
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I think because we have quite a lot of parks and low-density.  If I went up to Seattle, a much bigger city, and it was summer and the wading pools open, then 20+ kids, easily.  There, 20 kids would still be a lot but less noticeably crowded.  Here, wow!  That would be a big number.

 

 And could it be that kids don't wander down to the parks on their own here anymore?  I seem to remember walking with my sisters to the big city park near our house.  I see some older kids at the park on their own, but younger kids who in other decades might have been able to wander without parents (say 8-11), they aren't there without parents.  Maybe that makes a difference.


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#56 of 92 Old 09-10-2013, 08:52 AM
 
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 In all my years at playgrounds, I can't recall any cases of a child being hurt because he was sliding down when someone else started climbing up. It actually seems more likely that a toddler could get hurt while climbing up if an older child suddenly came sliding down, while the risk to the child sliding down seems relatively low. And yet my own girls climbed up all the time as toddlers without ever being hurt by anyone sliding down. Kids really are pretty smart about managing those kinds of interactions.

Slight aside but my DS has been quite badly injured a couple of times.  The one I clearly remember he was sat at the top of the slide waiting for the previous person to get off, however they've then turned round to climb up again, then climbed OVER him to rejoin the down queue, kicking him in the face in the process. Black eye, nosebleed, blood everywhere! One of those  saw what was about to happen but couldn't quite get there in time moments.

 

Part of the problem by us is that although there are lots of playgrounds they are all designed with under 5s in mind and there is nowhere for the older ones to play so they get creative, but are not aware enough to watch out for the littlies. Parents tend to either be watching a younger child or chatting, I guess most of the time there is no need to follow your 6/7/8 year old that closely.

 

My kids do best with black and white rules, they can climb the slide when there are no other kids around, be that at home or at the playground.

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#57 of 92 Old 09-10-2013, 09:50 AM
 
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yeah our kids do tend to go alone from age 8 or 9. That varies but mine certainly do. In a big city though, you'd have more kids? Perhaps not comparing like with like then, I'm in the inner suburbs of a very green city with a pop of 300,000. 

 

I think the playgrounds not designed for older kids is a HUGE issue. HUGE. We are starting to see some changes here-our second localest, prob the best our city has to offer, about a mile away, has some really inspired equipment for older kids, up to teenagers. Stuff that can be used in different creative ways. There's a huge playground very close to dp's work that has REALLY good stuff, good enough that people travel from other cities to use it. But that is in a relatively "deprived" area and one thing they've done very right is invest in quality play equipment. 


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#58 of 92 Old 09-10-2013, 11:01 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Catwmandu View Post
 

I do think I started out as a "slides are meant for going down" reaction.

 

^ Totally started like this!

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lazurii View Post
 

My kids are allowed to go up slides as long as:

 

*The slide is empty.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by fruitfulmomma View Post
 

As long as there aren't kids wanting to go down it, I am fine with that.

 

And now it's this. And that's my rule for everyone, my kids, friends kids, daycare kids... And if other parents aren't effectively making sure other kids can go down while they kids are monopolizing it then I'll tell them too. This last one most often happens at McD's (our only indoor playground in a town that sees 6-10 months of COLD SNOWY winter...

 


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#59 of 92 Old 09-12-2013, 05:16 PM
 
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No I do not, because she is only three and will think that if it is okay sometimes, it is always okay.  Plus, it is very frustrating to see the thing happen where she's trying to go down and some other kid then tries to go up.  She's been badly scared this way.  So, it's a general rule for us.  I think it contributes to too much playground chaos.

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#60 of 92 Old 09-13-2013, 07:28 AM
 
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I think it might depend on the playground, but seriously, why not let the poor kid go up if there is noone else  on the  slide? Why not just give right of way to those going down instead of banning her from doing a perfectly natural thing-climbing?

 

If you cant have chaos and climbing on the playground, where the heck can you have it?

 

My kids will have strong legs and feet because they got to do some climbing.

 

If the playground is too crowded for natural play, then i go to another one. I admit that i am lucky to  have a few to choose from.

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