Do you let your child go UP the slide?? - Page 3 - Mothering Forums
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#61 of 92 Old 09-13-2013, 08:24 AM
 
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Since you ask...

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Originally Posted by contactmaya View Post

I think it might depend on the playground, but seriously, why not let the poor kid go up if there is noone else  on the  slide?

I think those who don't have explained their personal reasons in their replies.

Why not just give right of way to those going down instead of banning her from doing a perfectly natural thing-climbing?

Some people do this, but not everyone
.

If you cant have chaos and climbing on the playground, where the heck can you have it?


On hikes, in trees, camping, at home, in the back yard, rock climbing classes, parkour, tumbling, in bouncy houses, in open fields, at Adventure Playground, etc.
Just because you choose to let your kids climb the slide doesn't mean that is the only place they could ever get climbing in, ever.


My kids will have strong legs and feet because they got to do some climbing.

That's great. Mine do because they climb everything constantly, just not on the slide because I have seen it cause injuries as well as hurt feelings. both easily avoided with a simple rule. There are so many things to climb in this world, I really feel it is fine to have a few rules in place when playing with other families on equipment. You don't feel that way? That's totally fine.

So, tell me you don't have any rules at all when it comes to playing in the playground. Say... They can't stray off the playground into the street. Um... Isn't this stifling their creativity? Aren't you crushing their freedom? No, you aren't, you're just keeping some basic safety rules. Reality check, seriously. You don't have to have the same rules as other parents, and you also don't have to draw some kind of diehard line in the sand about your choice as if it is intrinsically superior in some way. This isn't Breast v. Bottle.

If I sound defensive, it is because I'm really over the idea that a simple rule like this is somehow depriving our kids of strong legs and creativity. Can't people back up their choice without resorting to criticizing the choices of others?
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#62 of 92 Old 09-13-2013, 11:24 AM
 
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Thanks Tabitha...that is pretty much verbatim what I would have said about my "poor kid's" playground rule. Believe me, she gets (productive, fun, safe) chaos elsewhere, including elsewhere on the playground. Just not on the slide.
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#63 of 92 Old 09-13-2013, 11:46 AM
 
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When I was 9 I ran up the slid and my brother came down it on a tonka truck at the same time. I went over the edge and displaced a vertebrae. it was the first day of summer, and I spent the next 6 weeks in bed.  My brother had a bloody face from slamming into the ground at tonka truck speed and getting his nose slammed into his truck. I try to teach my kiddo that playground equipment is to be used the way it was intended. If you want to climb, climb up monkey bars or a rock wall, dont climb up the slide. 


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#64 of 92 Old 09-13-2013, 01:51 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by contactmaya View Post
 

I think it might depend on the playground, but seriously, why not let the poor kid go up if there is noone else  on the  slide? Why not just give right of way to those going down instead of banning her from doing a perfectly natural thing-climbing?

 

If you cant have chaos and climbing on the playground, where the heck can you have it?

 

My kids will have strong legs and feet because they got to do some climbing.

 

If the playground is too crowded for natural play, then i go to another one. I admit that i am lucky to  have a few to choose from.

 

Most playgrounds (at least where i live) have all sorts of opportunities to climb. In fact, to get to the top of the slide what do you have to do? Climb the ladder. LOL. (and yes i realize its a little different climbing a ladder and climbing a slide but still.....)

 
I think the vast majority of parents are ok with their kids climbing a slide if the park isnt that busy. But i also imagine that those that dont allow it have pretty good reasons why (their child has black/white thinking, their child is too young to move out of the way quickly, their park is always busy etc)....there is a difference in chaos and in kids all playing well together, cooperating, looking out for one another, being creative. I've been to parks (well usually its the McDs playland that gets this way) where there is a bunch of CHAOTIC kids...and really its no fun for the rest of the kids. The kids running around not being aware, not caring what the commonly accepted rules/guidelines are is what i would call chaos and thats a good way for someone to be hurt. And usually those kids either dont have a parent with them, or the parent is off chatting on their phone or sitting in the car, or the parent smiles happily at their child's "Freedom"....im a former unschooler and i get supporting freedom and kids being kids. But not everything works in all situations. I'd like to think most parents put the emphasis on keeping everyone safe and having fun. 
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#65 of 92 Old 09-14-2013, 07:33 AM
 
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1 year olds cant climb trees, nor some of those structures. Noone's  coming down the slide? Let her climb up, and calm down about it. Someone's coming down-give way to the person coming down.... accidents happen on playgrounds and elsewhere so be careful.... But pointless rules is not being careful, its  something else. (dont want to offend, so i wont say what it is actually is) 

 

Give way to others where appropriate, play safely, but  playground is for playing...my 3 mottos on the subject.

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#66 of 92 Old 09-14-2013, 07:57 AM
 
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I do see the point about feeling secure enough about our own parenting choices that we feel absolutely no need to criticize anyone else's parenting. I've been criticized enough myself to see how divisive and antithetical to creativity it is to always assume that people who see the world differently than me are just wrong, wrong, wrong.

 

I've seen similar debates ensue wherein "messy" moms accuse "tidy" moms of putting a clean house ahead of spending time on the floor playing with their kids and letting their kids make messes. It's kind of like our society has to go from one extreme to the other -- it used to be that many looked down their noses at "messy" parents or "permissive" parents, or others who don't fit the mold in some way, and then there grew to be enough of us who didn't fit the mold and we reacted by going on the defensive and bashing those who just happen to fit into the more socially acceptable stereotype -- and maybe not even because they were trying to fit in, but just because, for example, they happened to have a personal preference for a house where everything was clean and in its place.

 

I think we'll know that humanity has really evolved to a higher level when we are no longer so reactive and defensive about our choices and personal preferences, and especially when we can hear ourselves being criticized and just let it slide off without feeling any need to retaliate. It's like, we need to be willing to stop retaliating before the other side has even started to think about stopping. And when we're no longer retaliating, "they" won't have anyone to push back against, and eventually there won't be "us and them" anymore but just us.

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#67 of 92 Old 09-14-2013, 08:17 AM
 
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Well said, mammal mama! I try hard to simply say "this is what we do and this is why it works for us". I have many mom friends who do things very differently but they and their kids have different temperaments than we do. I often see that what I do with my kids would be a train wreck in their family and vice versa. I think the vast, vast majority of healthy moms are quite capable of recognizing what works for their family and circumstances.
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#68 of 92 Old 09-14-2013, 10:03 AM
 
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contactmaya I think the reason people have tended to give for having inflexible "black and white" rules around not going up the slide is very child specific. Some kids really do struggle with sometimes being able to do something and sometimes not. When kids are at an age when you have to trust them to make a judgement call, when you have several kids and can't individually supervise each one, having a blanket never rule can mean, in effect, being able to give everyone more freedom. I basically say to my kids "never ever go up the slide ever.".

 

But in specific circumstances they might come over and say, "look, there is no one else in the playground.". And then I'd normally relent because I know that they know its an exception, and I know we've had a conversation. They know that they have to think hard and persuade me before I'll break this rule. I am this strict because one of my kids, my oldest (10), does tend to need black and white rules-he prefers them, he doesn't like to hurt people either-and because the consequence of a young child being knocked off the big slides near us is potentially quite awful.

 

I think if you have a kid who can be more flexible, that's great. My own experience is that kids vary with how well they can remember rules, including by age but also by who they are with (my kids are fine and responsible alone. As a pack....). I do also tend to feel that its not a great idea for my big kids (5, 8 and 10) to be showing littler kids that its fun to go up slides, which is another reason I ask them not to if there are other kids around. I've said though-our playgrounds tend to be fairly crowded and only empty in bad weather. ETA: As homeschoolers, also, tbh we appreciate it when there are other people there to play with! Also, we often meet others at the playground, four or five large homeschooling families and you are often pushing 15-20 kids. That matters more to us than being able to climb up a slide, and I mention that only to say again, horses for courses.

 

FWIW, my kids are, from the evidence so far, pretty good at climbing (we have a local climbing wall and they all go with dp). They are all athletic and strong. Also, they appear to have pretty decent imaginations and are quite good at problem solving. So, based on my observation so far, obviously I'm a biased parent but I don't think that stopping them climbing up slides has had a serious effect. I'm ok with it :-)

 

I would like to see more and better creative apparatus for older kids though. I think that's a massive issue. ETA someone said, why are there no slides you can go UP? Well we actually have kind of that near us. Its a slide built from a hill with tarmac'd sides about 2 m wide each side, meaning kids can certainly climb up it (there's also a zigzag path). It doesn't have handles though! 

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#69 of 92 Old 09-14-2013, 10:15 AM
 
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Hey mamas

I just wanted to say thanks for being respectful and listening to others opinions even if you do not agree. No one parents the same and no one is right or wrong. Diversity is what keeps us creative and different.

I may be sending pm's for a couple of edits as I feel a few  posts are borderline in following Mothering's user aggreement.

Thanks and carry on!

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#70 of 92 Old 09-14-2013, 12:41 PM
 
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While it's the bigger kids climbing up slides that is most obvious, I find that it's the youngest set-- 10 months to 3 yrs-- that seem *compelled* to go up the slide.  What fun to climb up a bit and flop, sliding down on the belly.  (In absence of kids wanting to go down the slide) it is a great way to introduce the fun of a slide in small increments.  Sliding down feet first on belly is how the youngest kids can enjoy the slide before their torso strength allows greater control feet first-on--bottom facing forward (and, of course, that out-of-proportion head gets more in proportion!)  This kind of slide play is not only a great developmental step, it is tons of fun and cannot be reproduced anywhere else.  Sure, you can climb anywhere, but where else can you climb up and slide back down belly wise?  Sure, for older kids you can go up the right way and slide down, but for little kids, why not let them climb up and slide down on belly?  They are that much more in control of their down experience, and the slipperiness up the slide can be the funnest part.  

 

Yes, that one kid who doesn't follow the rules is annoying, yes, some kids need black and white to keep their world from being chaotic, but for the most part, teaching kids that X can happen only in the absence of Y is not that hard a concept if it keeps being reinforced.  Someone mentioned the street.  Well, we don't have a rule "never cross the street".  We have the rule "don't cross the street unless cars are absent."  Some kids are too young to decide when that's OK without mom's help.  Great.  Same for the slide.  "Don't go up the slide unless kids are absent".  I have always been close enough to remind girls of the rules, and remind other kids of the rules as well when they cut the line and climbed up when others were waiting to slide down.  In fact, the street rules are even harder, because the youngest children point out "There's a car."  Mom says "That car is parked, it's OK".  "There's a car."  "That car is going the other way."  If a parent can expect a child to eventually navigate streets, with all the insane nuances of situation (not to mention semantics) then kids can also eventually navigate the slide scenario.  With those rules, some parks might be off limits out of necessity because of high use.  Others, practically never.  

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#71 of 92 Old 09-14-2013, 01:08 PM
 
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While it's the bigger kids climbing up slides that is most obvious, I find that it's the youngest set-- 10 months to 3 yrs-- that seem *compelled* to go up the slide.  What fun to climb up a bit and flop, sliding down on the belly.  (In absence of kids wanting to go down the slide) it is a great way to introduce the fun of a slide in small increments.  Sliding down feet first on belly is how the youngest kids can enjoy the slide before their torso strength allows greater control feet first-on--bottom facing forward (and, of course, that out-of-proportion head gets more in proportion!)  This kind of slide play is not only a great developmental step, it is tons of fun and cannot be reproduced anywhere else.  Sure, you can climb anywhere, but where else can you climb up and slide back down belly wise?  Sure, for older kids you can go up the right way and slide down, but for little kids, why not let them climb up and slide down on belly?  They are that much more in control of their down experience, and the slipperiness up the slide can be the funnest part.  

 

Yes, that one kid who doesn't follow the rules is annoying, yes, some kids need black and white to keep their world from being chaotic, but for the most part, teaching kids that X can happen only in the absence of Y is not that hard a concept if it keeps being reinforced.  Someone mentioned the street.  Well, we don't have a rule "never cross the street".  We have the rule "don't cross the street when cars are absent."  Some kids are too young to decide when that's OK without mom's help.  Great.  Same for the slide.  "Don't go up the slide unless kids are absent".  I have always been close enough to remind girls of the rules, and remind other kids of the rules as well when they cut the line and climbed up when others were waiting to slide down.  In fact, the street rules are even harder, because the youngest children point out "There's a car."  Mom says "That car is parked, it's OK".  "There's a car."  "That car is going the other way."  If a parent can expect a child to eventually navigate streets, with all the insane nuances of situation (not to mention semantics) then kids can also eventually navigate the slide scenario.  With those rules, some parks might be off limits out of necessity because of high use.  Others, practically never.  

 

Yes, teaching my kids to 'think', in the face of complexity, thats important to me. I dont give them rules so much as guidelines. Our number one guideline, is 'Be considerate of others', another one would be, 'Dont do anything that puts yourself or others at risk', another is, 'Look for a solution that suits everyone', that kind of stuff...its a work in progress. Sometimes i use 'rules' when i see the kids need something more specific.

 

In my personal situation right now, its my 19mth old who likes to climb up the slide, the others, at 5 and 8,  arent that interested.

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#72 of 92 Old 09-14-2013, 01:35 PM
 
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I agree with the plea for acceptance and security. If someone else does not allow her kids to go up the slide, that is her decision and probably made for a good reason. I'm cool with that, while I also appreciate others tolerating my approach to my own child and being willing to give me the benefit of the doubt. 

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#73 of 92 Old 09-14-2013, 02:57 PM
 
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I agree with erigeron

 

My feeling is, good to debate the issues. This is one I've seen so many times on so many different boards over the years, given that its NOT breast vs bottle, the strength of feeling stirred up is amazing. I would never judge anyone for letting their kid go up the slide, regardless of outcome. I mean, quite aside from the fact that I really have better things to do, who knows what's behind that? Maybe the parent has had an awful day and cannot bear to say no again, maybe the kid has additional needs or communication difficulties. Maybe the person who seems to be the parent is actually a babysitter or older sibling? Etc. Similarly, I think every single person who says a blanket "no" has given a good reason on this thread. We just can't assume that all kids are amenable to logic, or that parents telling their kid not to climb up the slide in an empty park don't have a very good reason, based on knowing their kids, for doing that. Kids have different depths and ways of understanding, just as they learn to walk and read at different ages the ages which a child will be able to make a good judgement call about behaviour varies so much, and according to who else is around too.  I have the kid who, at 10, still does not always get the grey areas and it is not for want of discussion, or trying, I can assure anyone on that score. I have two younger kids who get it, so its probably not entirely my lousy parenting  I also don't think it matters that much for a child not to get to go up a slide. I mean, really? Kids can climb trees, swing on monkey bars, use a green gym, do a lot of other great stuff that builds similar muscles. 

 

If I were to give a rule as fuzzy as "be considerate of others" to my child, I would have a problem very fast and he would spend most of the session sitting it out and watching. I am not saying, if you have that kid who can manage with "be kind" then you should be doing more, simply that I think its fair to ask you to consider that this isn't everyone's experience. OTOH I wouldn't bother to say that to my girls because basically, they are motivated to be considerate and kind to others. And actually so is my oldest but he needs specific pointers about what people will perceive as considerate and what they will perceive as inconsiderate. He really doesn't stand out from his ten year old boy posse in this-a lot seems to change at this age. They generally know to be considerate and kind and so on, the issue is entirely the grey areas. Parenting evolves as children grow.

 

I think if it works for you that is great. Just don't criticise others because what works for you and yours doesn't work for their family. I think as a rule we know what our families actually need.

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#74 of 92 Old 09-14-2013, 04:08 PM
 
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You can go up the slide unless someone wants to come down.  Going down the slide has right of way.

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#75 of 92 Old 09-15-2013, 12:41 PM
 
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I would say 'Dont make noise in the hallway, because it inconsiderate of others'.  I cant really think of any other good reason for not making the noise. Many rules/expectations are based on consideration for others because we live in communities.

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#76 of 92 Old 09-15-2013, 10:34 PM
 
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"I would say 'Dont make noise in the hallway, because it inconsiderate of others'.  I cant really think of any other good reason for not making the noise. Many rules/expectations are based on consideration for others because we live in communities."

 

And if that works for your particular profile of kids, well enough for you that is great. Just consider that there are good reasons that it might not work for others. 

 

Also consider that there are some kids who don't want rules that vague, who would actually-I'm sorry-find that statement quite patronising. It offers no extra information and implies that the reason for their noise is inconsideracy , rather than, say, not realising that neighbour A is working nights. If an adult said that to me I'd bristle. With my kids I like to assume the best of them. 

 

My feeling is that every poster here is doing the best with the actual kids they have, and in the actual circumstances they have. That might not be the objectively best thing for that child at that moment, but parenthood is, a lot of the time, IME, about working out the least bad decision for everyone. Its not usually that other people haven't thought of the approach you describe, more that they've often tried it-by the time your oldesst kid is ten or so, I reckon you've tried everything you're going to! and it doesn't work for their family.

 

I think for any family with an ounce of thoughtfulness, what they are doing for their kids is probably going to be the right thing. Plus it really does take a lot to screw up a kid in a happy, listening, family IMO.


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#77 of 92 Old 09-16-2013, 09:31 AM
 
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Woah, this is such a hot topic! That is very amusing!

 

My son can go up the slide if he feels like it. Slides are for playing on. If there are other kids who want the slide, they obviously they have to take turns on it like with any other playground thing. If there are a lot of kids on one piece of equipment, I'm usually closer and more involved so my son can be guided and helped with the whole turn-taking thing. If there aren't any other kids, then I'm sitting on the park bench playing word games on my IPhone, and he could be PAINTING the slide for all I care.

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#78 of 92 Old 09-16-2013, 12:53 PM
 
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Also consider that there are some kids who don't want rules that vague, who would actually-I'm sorry-find that statement quite patronising.

 

Im not sure how its patronising. Having set rules that make no sense (not saying the rule  about the slide or the hallway makes no sense), seems more patronising to me. 

 

My feeling is that every poster here is doing the best with the actual kids they have, and in the actual circumstances they have.

 

I agree that everyone is doing the best they can. Many posters have good reasons for their rule about the slide, especially if they are used to a crowd, or have  other climbing opportunities for their children. Those of  us in the city only have the playground, no backyards, no extra space to explore-its all about avoiding cars....

 

I feel like many people are offended by the fact that i let my kid go up the slide, or dont have set rules....its surprising.  Anyway, ive said my piece

 
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#79 of 92 Old 09-16-2013, 12:55 PM
 
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Woah, this is such a hot topic! That is very amusing!

 

My son can go up the slide if he feels like it. Slides are for playing on.

Yes, they are for playing on. :-)

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#80 of 92 Old 09-16-2013, 01:53 PM
 
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contactmaya no one, as far as I can see, is offended that you let your kids go up the slide but rather that you've been a bit judgemental of those who don't.

 

We'll have to agree to disagree about what is patronising to kids :-). I know what my kids consider to be patronising because I've discussed it with them. I expect you've done the same. The main thing is that we are both acting according to what works for our families.


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#81 of 92 Old 09-17-2013, 04:58 AM
 
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If no one else is using the slide and its not muddy then the little ones can run up and down it to their hearts content -  as long as its safe of course! :)

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#82 of 92 Old 09-17-2013, 08:25 AM
 
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On an amusing side-note, I had an interesting instance of getting judged at the park a few weeks ago. Another woman sitting on the bench next to me commented to her friends that "Some people will let their kids do anything."

 

I'd just assumed she was referring to the woman who I think was the mother of a boy of about two who'd been running around swinging a big stick really close to some other kids. She'd gone up and told him to give her the stick, but when he swung it at her, she backed off and let him keep it.

 

But then, a moment later, the woman on the bench said, "Well, that girl finally got up off the ground" -- and I realized she was actually referring NOT to the stick-swinging toddler, but to my own 8yo dd lying down on the ground as part of her imaginary game. Of course, I'm the sort of parent who feels extremely proud whenever I see my kids getting fully immersed in their imaginary worlds, so I tend to be a bit taken aback when someone else expresses the idea that I shouldn't "allow" it. LOL.

 

And I think I ended up looking down my nose at her a bit later when she (if I'm remembering correctly) made a sudden decision that she was ready to go, and just expected her children, or the children in her care, to abruptly stop what they were doing and leave. "I" have a personal preference for allowing my kids at least 10 or so minutes of transition time, so it's extremely rare for me to just suddenly say, "We have to go now" and expect my kids to leave without any advance warning; I would only do so for a very good, and urgent, reason. And I kind of see "my way" as the right and considerate way to raise one's children. So there you go.

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#83 of 92 Old 09-17-2013, 02:22 PM
 
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On an amusing side-note, I had an interesting instance of getting judged at the park a few weeks ago. Another woman sitting on the bench next to me commented to her friends that "Some people will let their kids do anything."

 

I think that the parents that are perceived as 'letting their kids to do anything', get judged more often than not.

 

 

And I kind of see "my way" as the right and considerate way to raise one's children. So there you go.

 

I see you are treating others as you would like to be treated, thats another way of putting it. I really cant think of a better principle than this one when it comes to parenting, or anything. Not always as easy do admittedly, even with kids.

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#84 of 92 Old 10-12-2013, 06:03 AM
 
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On an amusing side-note, I had an interesting instance of getting judged at the park a few weeks ago. Another woman sitting on the bench next to me commented to her friends that "Some people will let their kids do anything."

 

I'd just assumed she was referring to the woman who I think was the mother of a boy of about two who'd been running around swinging a big stick really close to some other kids. She'd gone up and told him to give her the stick, but when he swung it at her, she backed off and let him keep it.

 

But then, a moment later, the woman on the bench said, "Well, that girl finally got up off the ground" -- and I realized she was actually referring NOT to the stick-swinging toddler, but to my own 8yo dd lying down on the ground as part of her imaginary game. Of course, I'm the sort of parent who feels extremely proud whenever I see my kids getting fully immersed in their imaginary worlds, so I tend to be a bit taken aback when someone else expresses the idea that I shouldn't "allow" it. LOL.

 

And I think I ended up looking down my nose at her a bit later when she (if I'm remembering correctly) made a sudden decision that she was ready to go, and just expected her children, or the children in her care, to abruptly stop what they were doing and leave. "I" have a personal preference for allowing my kids at least 10 or so minutes of transition time, so it's extremely rare for me to just suddenly say, "We have to go now" and expect my kids to leave without any advance warning; I would only do so for a very good, and urgent, reason. And I kind of see "my way" as the right and considerate way to raise one's children. So there you go.


I was at a play area with my 3 year old son and I was sat on a bench next to an elderly grandma. We were having a lovely chat when I realized it was near time for us to leave.  I called my son over and told him we have 10 minutes before we have to leave.  The grandma laughed knowingly, "Oh that is silly. He won't want to leave no matter how much warning you give him".  I decided not to get into a discussion so I just said that's just the way we do things and went back to our previous conversation. During the conversation, I gave my son a five minute warning. Before I could give him his two minute warning, he bounced up and said, "OK, ready to go". Grandma was floored.

 

As for slides, they can go up if it's the type of slide where they can see the top - and down-sliders get the right of way. I want my kids to play freely with other kids without a lot of parent intervention.  I want them to learn to negotiate with their peers and problem-solve. This leads me to another subject, I think I'll make a thread about it...

 

Does your elementary school have rigid playground rules?

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#85 of 92 Old 10-12-2013, 08:03 AM
 
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I was at a play area with my 3 year old son and I was sat on a bench next to an elderly grandma. We were having a lovely chat when I realized it was near time for us to leave.  I called my son over and told him we have 10 minutes before we have to leave.  The grandma laughed knowingly, "Oh that is silly. He won't want to leave no matter how much warning you give him".  I decided not to get into a discussion so I just said that's just the way we do things and went back to our previous conversation. During the conversation, I gave my son a five minute warning. Before I could give him his two minute warning, he bounced up and said, "OK, ready to go". Grandma was floored.

 

As for slides, they can go up if it's the type of slide where they can see the top - and down-sliders get the right of way. I want my kids to play freely with other kids without a lot of parent intervention.  I want them to learn to negotiate with their peers and problem-solve. This leads me to another subject, I think I'll make a thread about it...

 

Does your elementary school have rigid playground rules?

I like your approach. We too rarely have problems leaving the playground. I typically say-'we  have to go soon, whas the last thing you want to do before we leave?'

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#86 of 92 Old 10-22-2013, 11:04 AM
 
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I was at a play area with my 3 year old son and I was sat on a bench next to an elderly grandma. We were having a lovely chat when I realized it was near time for us to leave.  I called my son over and told him we have 10 minutes before we have to leave.  The grandma laughed knowingly, "Oh that is silly. He won't want to leave no matter how much warning you give him".  I decided not to get into a discussion so I just said that's just the way we do things and went back to our previous conversation. During the conversation, I gave my son a five minute warning. Before I could give him his two minute warning, he bounced up and said, "OK, ready to go". Grandma was floored.

again all depends on the child. 

 

gma would have been right about my child. dd WOULD come to me during her two minute warning and depending on her mood would scream and throw a tantrum or try to reason with me as to why we should stay longer. the ONLY time she would leave happily without a fuss is if we have something else fun to do. but going home for dinner was not a good enough reason to leave the park. 


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#87 of 92 Old 10-23-2013, 03:23 PM
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NO.....never.

 

I also taught them not to stand in front of the elevator while waiting.  Or stop in front of doors.  While we were in the grocery store -they stuck close to me and didn't take up the entire aisle.  etc etc etc


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#88 of 92 Old 10-24-2013, 03:27 AM
 
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NO.....never.

I also taught them not to stand in front of the elevator while waiting.  Or stop in front of doors.  While we were in the grocery store -they stuck close to me and didn't take up the entire aisle.  etc etc etc

I guess I don't really see those examples as analogous. There is nothing discourteous about climbing up the slide if you aren't blocking others from going down. You aren't inconveniencing anyone. And pretty much everyone on this thread who allows climbing has said that the rules are only if you can see the top and if no-one is waiting to come down.

I can see an argument for disallowing it on safety grounds but I admit I don't really get it as a manners thing.

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#89 of 92 Old 10-24-2013, 12:05 PM
 
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I guess I don't really see those examples as analogous. There is nothing discourteous about climbing up the slide if you aren't blocking others from going down. You aren't inconveniencing anyone. And pretty much everyone on this thread who allows climbing has said that the rules are only if you can see the top and if no-one is waiting to come down.

I can see an argument for disallowing it on safety grounds but I admit I don't really get it as a manners thing.

Its all about how much complexity a person can handle...

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#90 of 92 Old 10-25-2013, 10:15 PM
 
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FWIW, our local parks/recreation people were discussing slides once and they made a point of how good it is for kids to work out negotiating slides with one another (up/ down/ taking turns).  The slide itself was seen as an instrument in growing social skills - not just something to zip down (or climb up).  I really appreciated their perspective.

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