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#481 of 1095 Old 06-04-2006, 09:30 PM
 
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Yeah, dp used to touch the stove lightly and say "OW!, hot" in a very dramatic way... I'm not sure how much ds understood, but you could try it... i think yours is a little bit older than ds was when he actually burned himself, so who knows, maybe he'll totally get it.
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#482 of 1095 Old 06-05-2006, 01:03 PM
 
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toys...today dd played with a harmonica, glass jar full of dried rosebuds, wine corks, and 2 staplers. Dh said she can play with staplers?

I said, "why not?"
He said, "good point."


CC is cool!

Yesterday, DD ate a leaf and my mom kept saying no nonononono. My DH started to take it out of her mouth. I asked is the leafe toxic. He said no, so I said leave it there/it's fine. Sure enough, baby spit the leaf out about 1.5 feet. I didn't know a baby could spit that far! Well, she learned for herself that she doesn't want to eat a dried leaf. She did eat some grass and i'm okay with that as I know it had no chemicals on it.

Earlier she had a poker chip in her mouth. i watched her like a hawk. she was not interested in swallowing it (really too big for that anyway yet I still was a bit worried) and then i put it away when she was done exploring it. she had a field day looking through a junk box and listening to me play a harmonica form the box. then while she kept looking through the box at wine corks, etc, i read and lifted weights and packed for an upcoming trip.

i love letting her explore and have noticed that DH still leaves junk everywhere that he doesn't want her to get into. i told him to get it out of the way because i'm going to let her look at it. LOL
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#483 of 1095 Old 06-05-2006, 04:35 PM
 
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For DS, the learning of "hot" has been, well, a continuum. Whenever I get hurt (often) I say "ouch", so he learned from listening that that's a word to indicate something that hurts (in this language, at least). We delayed foods so he was older when he encountered warm/hot food (other than body temperature, LOL), so I don't really know how to do it with a little one (and we had the kitchen gated off), but it seems like just recently I put his hand over a bowl of hot food (or maybe over a hot pan?) and explained that the feeling in his hand was warmth from hot food, and the closer he got to the source the hotter it was going to be. Let me back up and say this wasn't some huge enforced *you must learn now* moment, it just happened to happen, and my putting his hand there was more after I held his hand back, as he tried to stick his hand in the hot whatever it was. So I explained that, and we practiced putting his hand near and far and let him see what the differences were in what he felt, and since then he puts his hand *over* something to check if it's hot. It's really cool to watch that. Now we have an open plan living room/kitchen, and I'd really have to buy stock in baby gates (and drill into the wall, which isn't something we did before and isn't something I want to do now) to keep him out, and that wouldn't work anyway b/c he can climb over now.

Anyway, it's a continuum of learning, I've noticed.
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#484 of 1095 Old 06-05-2006, 07:19 PM
 
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We've had an easy time with learning "hot". I have hot drinks several times a day ~10 months of the year, and I knew before my December baby was even born that I was going to disregard the books' and magazines' warning to never hold a hot drink and a baby at the same time! Thus, from birth my son has heard, "Not for you; it's hot." and seen that steam rises from those objects. I often hold him on one hip while stirring cooking food with the other hand, too, and he's seen us blow on bites of food before we eat them or offer them to him. By 10 months, he was puffing up his cheeks and blowing whenever he felt something was hot or saw something steaming--even across the street! A few times he's been mildly burned--by a droplet from my hot drink, by food that's hotter than we thought, or once by touching the instant-hot-water tap at a friend's house which had a few drops clinging to it--and we've made a point of saying, "It was HOT! It hurt you!" as we comfort him. He is now very careful of hot things and keeps back from anything we tell him is hot.

We haven't done EC, but just recently we've started leaving EnviroBaby diaper-free at night. I can't explain what gave me the idea. He had a persistent rash and needed more diaper-free time, and we were having trouble working it into our schedule...but until the first night we tried this, I thought he was peeing in his sleep all night. That is, I thought it intellectually, but as I was going to sleep that first night I felt strangely certain that I would not be waking up in a puddle. Turns out he doesn't pee until he starts waking up! I just posted on the EC forum for advice on how to get him to the bathroom at that point without making him mad (he's awake enough to pee before he feels like getting out of bed) but I'm thrilled that he has the ability to hold it all night! Hardcore EC-ers would say we trained him out of that by diapering, but apparently we didn't.

We haven't been to a swimming pool since he learned to walk, but we go to playgrounds several times a week, and EnviroBaby has never walked off the edge of a playground platform. I'd suspected that was not just a CC thing but related to his temperament, and PrincessDoll's post confirms it.

We don't babyproof much but have moved specific items that became problematic because he was fascinated by them and they were dangerous or important to us. Mostly he gets to play with stuff. No sharp knives yet, but he can have butter knives and forks as long as he doesn't run around with them.

My partner is finally reading TCC. After the section about birth and early infancy, he gave me a long tearful apology for failing to intervene more with the hospital personnel when EnviroBaby was born. I accepted the apology, but I understand why he didn't do more: Our midwife, whom we trusted to avoid unnecessary intervention, really let us down by stating unequivocally that things had to be done a particular way because there was meconium discharge just before delivery. The hospital procedure was to cut the cord immediately (we'd wanted it left attached until it stopped pulsing), take the baby away WITHOUT LETTING ME SEE OR TOUCH HIM FOR EVEN ONE SECOND to the other side of the room, suction his nose and mouth with a rubber bulb, and then (this is the part I didn't know until this recent conversation) leave him there under a heat lamp and hand the bulb to his father without ANY instruction in how to use it!!! (He did know how, but they didn't know that, and since it's possible to force stuff INTO the lungs if you use the bulb the wrong way, that's totally negligent!) He was on his own for half an hour before an orderly came and insisted on taking EnviroBaby to the ICU for observation, even though he was breathing fine, still without letting me see or touch him. EnviroDaddy feels guilty for not bringing EnviroBaby over to me during that half-hour, shoving past the people who were saying I couldn't hold him while I was getting stitches--I didn't need to HOLD him, just to see and touch him and know for sure that my baby was real and alive. I do wish EnviroDaddy had done more, but even more I wish I hadn't tried to "be brave" and "make the best of things" but had given voice to my feelings. If I had screamed ceaselessly, "GIVE ME MY BABY!!! MY BABY NEEDS ME!!!" maybe they would have listened; at least they would've known how I felt. I don't know if it really affected EnviroBaby in the long run, but it affected me horribly. I'll never get over it never ever ever. Of course I did tell EnviroDaddy how I felt when our baby was in the ICU and we were left completely alone together for an hour (it didn't even occur to the hospital or our midwife that we might need some kind of support or counseling!) but he didn't quite realize until reading this book: I felt as though my baby had died. I knew intellectually that it wasn't true, but to my body and spirit that was the only possible explanation for my empty arms. Everything was wrong wrong wrong. The after-birth treatment was far more painful and upsetting than it should have been because I wasn't getting the flood of hormones that would have been triggered by holding my baby. I told myself that our trusted midwife wouldn't allow this horrible thing to happen if it wasn't absolutely necessary to save my baby's life, but I just KNEW that it wasn't; every cry and snuffle I heard from him told me absolutely that what he needed was ME. And at that point I assumed they'd used some kind of special respiratory equipment that had to be set up on the other side of the room--it's just now that EnviroDaddy told me it was only a rubber bulb, which they could've used while EnviroBaby was lying on me with the cord still attached!!! : I can't believe they did this to us!!! Yet I know that this is routine and is far from the worst they do.

Well. Pardon my ranting.

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#485 of 1095 Old 06-05-2006, 07:48 PM
 
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Oh, Enviro...I'm so sorry that happened to you guys. I know the feeling of never ever being able to get over something...major cyberhugs from me to you.

Those stupid stupid rules about meconium...our wannabe-trusted midwives tornadoed me to the hospital past a STACK of research studies that show that meconium, in a healthy, term, mature-lunged baby was not a problem...they just wanted to dump us. And dump us they did, into the arms of the den of tigers (do tigers have dens?).

As my boy came out and was handed to a nurse, he coughed, and started YELLING, not wailing like a newborn, not screaming like he was hurt, but hollering as if to say "WHAT THE ********* ARE YOU PEOPLE DOING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!"...and then the nurses had the GALL to write that he was slow to start breathing on his records. : liars.



Anyway, your rant is heard.


*****
We don't have the guts to go diaperfree at night (I'm slow to wake up sometimes) but we *could*, as DS holds his pee until the morning as well. I have one of those BBLPs, and just bring it up onto the bed to sit him on for his morning pee. I can't be bothered to get out of bed yet. I'm washing fewer and fewer diapers now; only the ones we're too busy or he's too absorbed in whatever he's doing, to catch on time...

*****

DH is NOT getting it, grr! The builder was at our house, fixing things that weren't finished before the house was purchased (we're tenants), and DH and DS were looking around outside. I finally heard DH silently bringing a screaming DS in, and asked what was going on...DS was climbing on rocks, DS was throwing dirt at the next door house, DS was doing something else DH decided was forbidden...I asked DH if he'd offered any "allowed" things, and DH said yes, but I doubt it...he wasn't talking; how could he have offered anything to DS?

Why can't he play on the rocks on our property? He might fall. Onto soft, uncut grass. Why can't he throw dirt? Because it's rude. Was it hitting the house? No. Why can't he do the other thing? Because *some stupid reason*...:

I'm going to blame it on mutual exhaustion from this move, as well as frustration b/c the builder had to have us here while he was here, rather than our planned trip to our apartment to continue packing...



can't play on rocks b/c he might fall...russa frussa mrussa...:



(should edit to mention that the rocks are part of the retaining wall. a rock wall, as it were. perfect for climbing. he wouldn't have gotten very high, and DH could easily have caught him if DS fell. MY fear about it would be spiders and such (and a hidden fear of rattlesnakes from having grown up in CA), but that's not exactly the same as "he might fall".)
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#486 of 1095 Old 06-07-2006, 01:29 PM
 
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Thanks for the sympathy, Molly. It's nice to be here where people understand.

I'm glad my partner isn't much into the "he might fall" kind of thing. EnviroBaby is learning to climb steps standing up, and EnviroDaddy's been letting him practice on a retaining wall down the street that is "stepped" higher and higher as it goes uphill; when he's standing on the top level holding your hand, your hand is up near your head and his feet are at shoulder level! We wouldn't do it without holding hands at this stage, but I bet he'll be capable of balancing there unassisted at an age most people will find appallingly young!

EnviroBaby seems to have inherited his father's natural grace and good physical judgment. I was very clumsy as a kid and had poor balance...but my parents weren't into "you might fall" either; they encouraged me to keep trying if I felt comfortable and would help hold me up, etc. In particular, I remember as a preschooler enjoying walking on curbs (I grew up in a flat place with very few retaining walls, but I liked those too when available) but often losing my balance and falling into the street and gouging my knees. My parents invariably responded with, "Oops! Yeah, it's scary to fall. It hurts. And just when you were having such fun walking on the curb. Well, let's fix up those knees."

I saw in Parents Magazine an article on playground etiquette saying not only that you should not allow your child to play on equipment designed for younger children, but that you should intervene when you see other parents do so. Whatever. EnviroBaby finds the big-kid equipment far more interesting than the toddler section, and I think it's really building his skills!

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#487 of 1095 Old 06-07-2006, 02:09 PM
 
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A while back, I asked the MDC boards if we could have a forum for The Continuum Concept. They wanted me to list all the topics involved, and explain in detail why we needed a separate forum. I haven't wanted to go through all that work; and no one else seemed to want to either. So....

How about under the FINDING YOUR TRIBE, we can have a thread for each topic we want discussed. In the subject line put "Continuum Concept mamas RE: ____" (in the blank put the specific topic)

I just started one myself about community: http://www.mothering.com/discussions...85#post5295385
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#488 of 1095 Old 06-07-2006, 02:58 PM
 
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EnviroBecca, I KNOW WHAT YOU MEAN. I had basically the same thing happen to me. Read the link in my sig to find out my birth story. I didn't write about what happened afterward, cause I was still processing at the time it was written. My waters broke and there was meconium, so they cut the cord right away (against my birth plan), suctioned her before she was all the way out, then when she came out, they put her on me for a SECOND. I barely got to look at her (and she was making that sad lip pouty face kids do so well. I was about to comfort her) before they took her away to be suctioned again. And then they did all the standard things to her. I felt it was wrong, but before I could get mad about it, I started hemmorhaging, and after that, didn't care about much. I feel SO GUILTY for what happened to her. And I"m really angry at the hospital for not letting me bond with her. It's completely reinforced my beliefs that homebirth is the only way to go for me. I KNEW nothing was wrong with her. But, when you're pushing, there's really no energy left over to argue. I"m so sad about how they treated us immediately after the birth.

In other news, I'm really having to fight my urges to not let her explore. We haven't done any babyproofing yet, cause she's not really that mobile. The other day, she was rolling around on the bed, and she rolled near the edge. I told her if she rolled again, she'd roll off, and I put my arm there. Then, I thought, and I took my arm away, but I watched her. She did end up rolling off the bed, but I caught her arm, and she sort had a controlled fall. She didn't like it too much, though. She wasn't hurt. And the other day, she was reaching for the dirt in the garden, and I let her grab some, but not bring it to her mouth. Next time, maybe I'll let her explore with her mouth.

Anyway, that's my news here.
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#489 of 1095 Old 06-07-2006, 03:15 PM
 
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Persephone, I don't know if you want other peoples' thoughts on the bed rolling thing, so if not, please ignore:

Rather than "you're going to roll off" (which she then obliged you by doing so, yes?), perhaps explaining, using words you know don't mean much to her, but doing it anyway..."there's an edge of the bed, and I know you might not know what that means, so let me show you, this is the bed (touch), and this is what is off the edge (space, air), and when you get close, you should slow down with your rolling (rolling? that young! wow) so you can feel the edge and stop". And I think DS was 6 month by the time it became relevant, so that's when we showed him, but since your girl is so mobile, you might as well show her how to go feet first now. It only took a little while on the bed (DS, DH and I) showing him several times how to get off feet first, and he had that skill from that day forward. We had boxspring/mattress on the floor, but the next time we took him on a trip and stayed at the Westin (obnoxiously tall beds) he went to the edge, turned around, and held onto the sheets as he slipped down to the floor, feet first. Yep, he plopped down onto his butt after, but it wasn't a fall, it was controlled.
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#490 of 1095 Old 06-07-2006, 10:35 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AmyMN
A while back, I asked the MDC boards if we could have a forum for The Continuum Concept. They wanted me to list all the topics involved, and explain in detail why we needed a separate forum. I haven't wanted to go through all that work; and no one else seemed to want to either. So....

How about under the FINDING YOUR TRIBE, we can have a thread for each topic we want discussed. In the subject line put "Continuum Concept mamas RE: ____" (in the blank put the specific topic)

I just started one myself about community: http://www.mothering.com/discussions...85#post5295385
Ooh, its own forum! That would be so amazing!
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#491 of 1095 Old 06-07-2006, 11:39 PM
 
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EnviroMom--Hugs to you. I'm so sorry about your birthing experience.
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#492 of 1095 Old 06-07-2006, 11:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EnviroBecca
I saw in Parents Magazine an article on playground etiquette saying not only that you should not allow your child to play on equipment designed for younger children, but that you should intervene when you see other parents do so. Whatever. EnviroBaby finds the big-kid equipment far more interesting than the toddler section, and I think it's really building his skills!
It sounds to me like the article says not to let your older kids play on euiqpment for younger kids? I don't think that's so bad as some younger kids get intimidated by larger kids. A the playground the other day, a bunch of high schoolers were yelling, hitting the equipment to make musical noise and so on. I think some of the toddler set could be offput by that. Not to mention a 150 lb high schooler on a slide with a 20 lb toddler might not be such a great idea.

Hmmm...I'm open the idea I'm way off base!
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#493 of 1095 Old 06-07-2006, 11:57 PM
 
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Molly, I appreciate the thoughts. I'm new at this whole mobile baby thing. I guess rolling at 4 months is early? She was rolling at 2 months, and she's working on crawling now. She can actually scoot a bit, when she's really motivated.

At the moment, dd is chewing on the handle of some scissors. Dh was holding the blades, so she couldn't chew on them, and I just said it's ok for her to explore the whole thing. And he jokingly said, "Maybe tomorrow I can show you my ax, baby girl!" How can I explain to him about intention and safety?
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#494 of 1095 Old 06-08-2006, 11:13 AM
 
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Hi! I'm new to CC (book is coming at the library so waiting...). I've read lots of the articles and all the stuff on the website though. We've been doing a lot of it already without knowing it. Lots of in arms, cosleeping, breastfeeding etc. And lately I've been lots better about just going about my business and donig things around the house with ds in a carrier too. I have a few questions.....stemming from my lack of knowledge and experience on the subject and the fact that I was definitley NOT raised this way.

1) Learning to crawl? How do babies gain the muscle strength to crawl when they are constantly in arms? It sounds like around 6 months they just crawl out of your arms and have never been on the floor. Ds wasn't on the floor a ton, but he was a little bit. My dad, of course, claims they will never learn if they are not down there. They already bug us that we hold ds too much.

2) In between phase? Ds seems to be getting out of the in arms phase a little. I still like him to be there a lot though but he is starting to push away and want to be on the floor where he can scoot a bit and push up. What do I do in this phase between in arms and where he can help me do things? Just let him explore on his own? As long as his in arms needs were filled he will just be happy to explore on his own and come to me as needed? It makes me a little sad that this phase is almost done! I liked it

3) Expecting Certain Behavior A little bit about the "just expecting" behavior and getting it, b/c you truly expect it. I really want to do this. I'm a little brainwashed into thinking that kids are going to not listen and act up. Can anyone give me thoughts and personal experience from this. How do you make yourself really believe they will comply and not sound wishy washy. Just do it?

4) Safety I don't have a prob with exploring. I think it's great. Unfortunately, I really do think that it is unsafe for babies to have certain materials in their mouths. I don't like ds to have plastic items or lots of mainstream toys/products b/c of all I've read about the chemicals and how it's bad for babes. Obviously not all of the things in my home can be made of completely natural things....especially the stuff he wants! Any advice?


I'd love to hear thoughts and such. This is so great!

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#495 of 1095 Old 06-08-2006, 12:42 PM
 
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I wrote:
Quote:
I saw in Parents Magazine an article on playground etiquette saying not only that you should not allow your child to play on equipment designed for younger children, but that you should intervene when you see other parents do so.
Oops, I meant to write, "equipment designed for OLDER children". I agree with Henhao that it makes sense to get older kids off the equipment for younger kids if their behavior on it is dangerous or intimidating to the toddlers. (If a few preteens are sitting on the toddler slide talking, and no toddlers are wanting to use the slide now, I have no problem with that.) Similarly, if younger kids are on the equipment designed for older kids and their behavior is impeding the older kids (for example, when my toddler wants to sit on the bottom step of the narrow staircase that is the only way up to the top level, and kids want to get up there) a parent should guide the younger kids to appropriate behavior or remove them. What I object to is the idea that equipment designed for older children is so inherently dangerous to toddlers that they never should be allowed to explore it in any way.

Persephone, I had excess bleeding after giving birth, too--my midwife said it was 5cc below the criterion for a hemorrhage. I thought that was just the way it happened. But EnviroDaddy suggested after reading TCC that the sudden separation from my baby might have caused a shock response that delayed clotting.

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#496 of 1095 Old 06-08-2006, 02:25 PM
 
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#497 of 1095 Old 06-08-2006, 02:44 PM
 
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Crawling...well for us, DS was on the floor. I couldn't wear him all the time, plus it was summer and we were sweaty, and he enjoyed his time on the floor as I walked around, talking to him.

But all those hours in arms, developing the tiny little muscles we use for the infinitissemal balance adjustments, really do help a baby get good at moving and moving well.


The Parenting magazine...I bet that article was based on the insurance concerns of playgrounds...I doubt it had anything to do with actual development and whatnot, but rather just from the *fear of lawsuits* of playground equipment and owners...
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#498 of 1095 Old 06-08-2006, 06:44 PM
 
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Diaper-free nights: actually, ds initiated the idea himself after I remarked a couple of times that his diaper was dry when he woke up.

Crawling: ds was sitting at 4 mos and crawling at 5 mos... startling us all.

Uptight dh's: well, actually, I have had the opposite situation. Dp is always letting ds do things that seemed dangerous to me (but he's never gotten hurt doing them...). I don't really have a problem with it any more, but when he was really tiny, I would freak out a bit. i think he's a much more natural CC-er than I am.
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#499 of 1095 Old 06-08-2006, 07:08 PM
 
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Thank you! Yes, all of that makes perfect sense. We carried ds all the time and everyone was always commenting on his neck strength! I don't have a problem with ds exploring and would like to encourage it. I guess maybe as he gets older (he's 5 months by the way) he won't just automatically stick everything in his mouth. I could totally see letting him handle all kinds of stuff....I just don't want certain things going in his mouth I guess. Not b/c I'm afraid he'd swallow them or choke but b/c I've been doing lots of reading on the "Natural Home and Body" forum and it seems that lots of plastic things and such are just not ok for babes to suck on b/c they are toxic. Funny how teething rings are generally made of plastic! I guess he won't be at this stage forever so it won't always be a problem
Still trying to wrap my mind around the whole scissors, buttons etc......guess I must be really brainwashed into thinking these things are REALLLY dangerous

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#500 of 1095 Old 06-08-2006, 09:44 PM
 
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I wanted to amend something I wrote before; I wasn't "using all my words". I meant that DS was on the floor much of the time, not that he was on the floor ALL of the time. I should also mention that I wasn't doing much housework for months and months, so even if I had been wearing him, he wouldn't have gotten much of a sense of me doing much.

I remember thinking he was late to roll over and such, but he was pulling to stand at 6 months, so he was an interestingly mobile bebe.

Our babyproofing, other than the gates to protect kitchen and kitty, was mainly getting the things we didn't want mouthed OFF of his level, leaving the things we were cool with being mouthed there, and trying to keep an eye on him. I once seriously choked on a quarter when I was a toddler, and the ONLY reason I'm around is because it was at our neighbor's house, and she had long fake fingernails (my mom was a hippie and didn't grow her nails, let alone have fake ones) that she was able to pull the quarter out with (not the standard method of quarter extraction, but it worked)...so I keep coins and buttons away from him, even now...money is disgustingly dirty anyway...and not the good kind of dirt IMO.
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#501 of 1095 Old 06-09-2006, 11:22 PM
 
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I'm interested in the cc approach to parenting and I'd like to tell everyone what I did yesterday with dd. She turned 2 in April. Yesturday I put all the ingredients for cookies(no sugar) in seperate containers and bowls on the table and gave her spoons and wooden spoons and just let her go to work. It was so hard for me to just step back and let her do her thing! But I did it. And she did amazingly!! She poured and stired and mixed and made a grand mess. In the end I helped her mix it well and gave her a cookie sheet to drop the dough onto. She made cookies and then did her own dishes afterwards. And then wanted to bath in the water she washed her dishes in and so I just let her!!! All in all this took about 2 1/2 hours. She had a blast, was the calmest I have ever seen her and was not her usual whinny self. It was amazing. I spent the very minimal amount of time "supervising" her and basically stayed in the other room unless she needed me(which wasn't that often)!
Anyway..it got me thinking about the cc and this tribe which I want to learn more from.

chicken3.gifbelly.gifwow...i'm gonna have another one!!!
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#502 of 1095 Old 06-09-2006, 11:26 PM
 
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nak

i'm having issues with finding stuff to do with dd-4 months. she comes with when i do chores, but what about when i'm not? i feel i don't interact with her enough.
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#503 of 1095 Old 06-09-2006, 11:44 PM
 
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mostly with my little fire he loves to look at my face and talk. he likes when i sing songs and move him roughly from side to side when he's laying on the floor. he also likes to sit at the table and watch his family interact, laugh, argue, whathave you. try having her at eye level more...being around other kids so she can just watch...she will be amazed at the loudness and laughter of children!! fire loves all other children and is very happy when i have lots of kids around him.

chicken3.gifbelly.gifwow...i'm gonna have another one!!!
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#504 of 1095 Old 06-10-2006, 03:05 AM
 
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Hello all, just found this thread and have read the first few pages....I'm just finishing up the book now.

My most immediate thought/question has to do with wearing baby and my own activity/movement, or lack there of. Especially as it concerns helping my dd "burn off" some of her own energy stores.

I live in nyc, have no backyard. I also work at home which is about 40% computer, 40% jewelry making, 20% moving around, filling and packing orders, errands, etc.

For those of you who are not able to be outside as much... working in gardens (sigh).... or who don't move so much around the house (i have a one room loft, not a whole house with stairs and toddlers to chase after! ) do your dc's get restless in their slings? my dd needs to be on the go in her sling, unless she is sleeping.

I guess I'm just looking for some comments regarding the CC and our more sedantary lifestyle. Don't get me wrong--I take my dd for a walk everyday, but I know i just cant provide the amount of movement our babies have evolved to expect!

mama to : my spirited star 2/06, my sweet love 5/08, and a little lovey 5/12

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#505 of 1095 Old 06-10-2006, 10:05 AM
 
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Ang, that sounds so great! I am looking forward to doing things like that with my dd.

Just curious - I am returning to work p/t soon (dh and grandma will be with dd, as will her auntie...talk about a tribe!). I work with children from preschool to high school age, doing environmental/outdoor ed programs. I've found that becoming a parent has really changed my approach, and I am wondering if any of you know about people who integrate cc and slightly more formal education... I'd imagine that cc would go well with an unschooling approach. I guess I am curious about how I am going to integrate my new thoughts into a program with a theme and a certain time allotted to it. And of course, our programs integrate into the standard school curriculum.

For example: a cc approach to creating crafts, exploring outside, etc.
I think that our programs are already very much like this, but I'm curious to see if anyone else has ideas about how to do this.

Tricia, treehugger.gif wild.gif geek.gif mama of dd (6) 

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#506 of 1095 Old 06-10-2006, 03:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklyn lisa
My most immediate thought/question has to do with wearing baby and my own activity/movement, or lack there of. Especially as it concerns helping my dd "burn off" some of her own energy stores.
I'm new to CC myself, but I came across this section on Liedloff's website the other day and it really jumped out at me:

"The second essential function of the in-arms experience appears to have escaped the notice of everyone (including me, until the mid-1960s). It is to provide babies with a means of discharging their excess energy until they are able to do so themselves. In the months before being able to get around under their own power, babies accumulate energy from the absorption of food and sunshine. A baby therefore needs constant contact with the energy field of an active person, who can discharge the unused excess for each of them. This explains why the Yequana babies were so strangely relaxed — why they did not stiffen, kick, arch, or flex to relieve themselves of an uncomfortable accumulation of energy.

"To provide the optimum in-arms experience, we have to discharge our own energy efficiently. One can very quickly calm a fussing baby by running or jumping with the child, or by dancing or doing whatever eliminates one's own energy excess. A mother or father who must suddenly go out to get something need not say, "Here, you hold the baby. I'm going to run down to the shop." The one doing the running can take the baby along for the ride. The more action, the better!

"Babies — and adults — experience tension when the circulation of energy in their muscles is impeded. A baby seething with undischarged energy is asking for action: a leaping gallop around the living room or a swing from the child's hands or feet. The baby's energy field will immediately take advantage of an adult's discharging one. Babies are not the fragile things we have been handling with kid gloves. In fact, a baby treated as fragile at this formative stage can be persuaded that he or she is fragile."

I know how you feel, because I used to work about stimulating DS "enough" when he was very tiny. I wish I had known about this forum then!

HTH!
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#507 of 1095 Old 06-10-2006, 08:04 PM
 
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Yes, LAPH100, thats the exact part of the concept Ihad in mind when I posted....since I know I'm just not as active as a Yequana woman wearing her baby! I see from reading here that some mamas are able to be super active with babe in sling, but I dont think I'm alone in having to sit at desk, etc.
Like now--babe is restless-gotta go.

Oh, btw--didnt mean to imply I work 100% of my day! (i work like 10% of it, and during that time the above describes the breakdown of activity!)

mama to : my spirited star 2/06, my sweet love 5/08, and a little lovey 5/12

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#508 of 1095 Old 06-10-2006, 11:17 PM
 
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just now finding this tribe and reading the book- it fits so much with the stuff i did instinctually, esp with the last two after I discovered Dr Sears and knew that other people followed their instincts as well.
any ideas how cc concepts can be applied to older kids? I'm still working my way through the book so maybe its covered, but i thought i'd ask here anyway.

Punk, hippy, mama to 4 amazing kiddos, Boy#1 (18), TheGirl (13), Boy#2 (11- PBD) and Boy#3 (6)
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#509 of 1095 Old 06-12-2006, 06:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Madre Piadosa
just now finding this tribe and reading the book- it fits so much with the stuff i did instinctually, esp with the last two after I discovered Dr Sears and knew that other people followed their instincts as well.
any ideas how cc concepts can be applied to older kids? I'm still working my way through the book so maybe its covered, but i thought i'd ask here anyway.
Older kids - I didn't read it until ds was 8 and dd was just born. CC totally flows with my parenting style, (it wasn't a 'new' concept to me either, TCC just put a name to it and reinforced my belief to stick to my instincts) But as ds got older I started to panic, this world is so crazy and he's exposed to so much that could get way out of control (video games, high fructose corn syryp...) I found myself micromanaging him. I needed the reminder that he needs to be involved in our household activities, I need to TRUST him and trust him to learn from his own mistakes, not to harp on him too much ...
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#510 of 1095 Old 06-12-2006, 08:15 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by corwinegall
Older kids - I didn't read it until ds was 8 and dd was just born. CC totally flows with my parenting style, (it wasn't a 'new' concept to me either, TCC just put a name to it and reinforced my belief to stick to my instincts) But as ds got older I started to panic, this world is so crazy and he's exposed to so much that could get way out of control (video games, high fructose corn syryp...) I found myself micromanaging him. I needed the reminder that he needs to be involved in our household activities, I need to TRUST him and trust him to learn from his own mistakes, not to harp on him too much ...
i must admit...we are stricter with our older boys in these areas too. i have yet to find a ballance.

for example...watching movies...playing video games...hanging with friends.
where do you draw the line or do you??
if the family is most important(which i think it is) then how do we set up rules concerning outside influences?
Church is another one. There is great community/tribe potential but it's hard to get the boys to want to go. WWYD??What would the cc way be?make your kids go cuz that's where your tribe is or let them stay home therefor splitting the family and growing apart or everyone stay home?Again wwyd?

chicken3.gifbelly.gifwow...i'm gonna have another one!!!
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