Leashes for children...yeah or nay. - Page 7 - Mothering Forums

View Poll Results: Leashes...yeah or nay?
Horrible devices of evil. 67 24.19%
Necessary evil for child safety. 62 22.38%
A good tool that gives greater freedom to child and parent. 132 47.65%
Cool....I always wanted another pet. 16 5.78%
Voters: 277. You may not vote on this poll

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#181 of 211 Old 11-01-2005, 05:57 PM
 
jaye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 889
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raven
MITB ~ I want to try and gently point out to you that the manner in which you are posting is not very condusive to getting your point across. I have come to learn through my experiences as a mother, doula, friend and woman, that trying to place EVERYONE in the same box just doesn't work. Your way may work for you but that does not mean that it works for all. Please try and open your heart and mind and let yourself know that the REAL essense of Attachment Parenting is not about racking up credentials but rather about doing what is best for the child (and again - what is best for you may not be best for everyone). Yes there are certain guidelines and principles, but I think you are overstepping the mark here.

:

jaye is offline  
#182 of 211 Old 11-01-2005, 05:59 PM
 
johub's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 2,270
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamaInTheBoonies
That is why it is not an either/or, only in certain situations when it is warranted. Not all the time, like you seem to be saying.


I just can't believe what you are saying. A 15 mo is still a baby and I cannot believe that someone would put a leash on a baby.
Here I am arguing for 2, 3, and 4 yo, I never thought ppl would put a leash on a baby.
It is the smallest that have the most difficulty with impulse control. I have used a harness on my now 2 year old once. But there woudl simply be no need for my 3 year old.
But now it is easy to understand why you keep arguing that a child should be taught to stay closeby, and understand some safety rules like not darting into the street. Certainly that is very very true for a 3 or 4 year old.
Not at all true of many children under the age of 2 1/2 or so.
I think almost all of us who are saying a leash could be a good tool are referring to young toddlers and not preschoolers.
Joline
johub is offline  
#183 of 211 Old 11-01-2005, 06:22 PM
 
loraxc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: In the Truffula Trees
Posts: 4,480
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
So why is it worse to put a 15 mo on a harness than a 3 year old? I thought your argument was that my child was going to feel dehumanized and compare herself to a dog...who's more likely to do that, a 15mo or a 3 year old? (Not that I think either is likely, mind you.) And I thought your *other* argument was that I should be teaching my DD to stay close and stay safe--who is that easier to do with, a 15mo or a three-year-old?

So where did my "baby" belong? She was an awfully good runner for a 15mo. She had no impulse control, as johub points out. She wouldn't go in the sling after she could walk, baby or not. But wait, that would have been bad, too....right?

Oh, just never mind. (I was actually talking to another poster...)

grateful mother to DD, 1/04, and DS, 2/08

loraxc is offline  
#184 of 211 Old 11-01-2005, 06:31 PM
 
Stinkerbell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: South of Boston
Posts: 1,773
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My child's safety totally trumps someone else's hangups about what the tether/harness/leash looks like or reminds them of. Don't use it if you don't like it but don't tell me (or other tether-using parents) that we are treating our children like dogs. That's just confrontational and judgemental. My middle child NEVER learned as a toddler not to run off. He just found it far too much fun. Very impulsive child and with 4 other kids (I had a daycare) I did whatever I needed to to keep him safe and comfortable. And I'm not going to apologize or feel guilty about that.
Stinkerbell is offline  
#185 of 211 Old 11-01-2005, 06:40 PM
Banned
 
~member~'s Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: on a lily pad
Posts: 13,061
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raven
MITB ~ I want to try and gently point out to you that the manner in which you are posting is not very condusive to getting your point across. Yes there are certain guidelines and principles, but I think you are overstepping the mark here.
For stating my opinion? I was answering the OP, not trying to "get my point across" to anyone in that particular post.
Funny that everyone is trying to justify the use of a leash to me. Is my opinion really that important?
~member~ is offline  
#186 of 211 Old 11-01-2005, 06:51 PM
Banned
 
~member~'s Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: on a lily pad
Posts: 13,061
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
A good tool that gives greater freedom to child and parent.
Greater freedom from what? Watching and teaching your child? Freedom from holding their hand?
I thought part of Attachment parenting is being close to your child, not physically attached to your child.

Holding hands, carrying your child are ways of creating a human to human bond.
Communicating with your child is a wonderful way of creating a stronger bond, than using a leash.

Communication is more important to a child's development than learning how to be connected to a leash.
~member~ is offline  
#187 of 211 Old 11-01-2005, 08:20 PM
 
nomadmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: wandering again
Posts: 1,140
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamaInTheBoonies
Okay, when I got my sling and read about using it as a Harness, I did not take that as meaning a leash or tether, but using it as a harness to your body....your child is harnessed to the adults body, it is not like a sling, but the child is upright and able to see and interact....like how those Snugli backpacks are, I would criss-cross the sling so that my child was piggy-back, but could not fall off my back and onto their head, kwim?
O.k. This at least explains some of the confusion. I have (in this and the other thread) been using the term "sling" to mean *any* type of carrying device worn by the mother. I know there are many different styles, but I was just lumping them all together. Is that why you said that slings are for infants, thinking I was going around w/ my 3 y.o. cradled in the sling like a newborn?( ) Sorry for not being clear.
nomadmom is offline  
#188 of 211 Old 11-01-2005, 09:38 PM
Banned
 
~member~'s Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: on a lily pad
Posts: 13,061
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by nomadmom
Is that why you said that slings are for infants, thinking I was going around w/ my 3 y.o. cradled in the sling like a newborn?( ) Sorry for not being clear.
Yeah, which is why I was confused, because it would seem to be quite uncomfortable for mom and 40lb+ child to be like that. Not that I couldn't see someone trying.
Yeah, I just couldn't wrap my mind around that one, didn't even occur to me that's not what ppl meant.
~member~ is offline  
#189 of 211 Old 11-02-2005, 01:41 AM
 
sparkprincess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: St. Louis MO
Posts: 3,482
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
My child's safety totally trumps someone else's hangups about what the tether/harness/leash looks like or reminds them of. Don't use it if you don't like it but don't tell me (or other tether-using parents) that we are treating our children like dogs. That's just confrontational and judgemental.
Yup! That pretty much sums it up for me.

We just came back from a trip to Memphis and Houston. We purchased a harness ahead of time. Our 16 mos old does not like the stroller and is sometimes happy in the sling.

We used the harness as little as possible, but there were times when ALL he wanted to do is walk. And walk. And walk. We just felt like the harness would keep him safer.

Soo, having said that....I still don't like the way they look and I hated using one, but I really did feel like it was for the best.
sparkprincess is offline  
#190 of 211 Old 11-02-2005, 02:01 AM
 
jrayn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Central FL
Posts: 1,614
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamaInTheBoonies
Greater freedom from what? Watching and teaching your child? Freedom from holding their hand?
I thought part of Attachment parenting is being close to your child, not physically attached to your child.

Holding hands, carrying your child are ways of creating a human to human bond.
Communicating with your child is a wonderful way of creating a stronger bond, than using a leash.

Communication is more important to a child's development than learning how to be connected to a leash.
Okay I noticed that your title is "mama in the boonies" which I assume means you live in the "boonies", for you it would seem that allowing your children more freedom would be a safe option as you walk along the road or in the stores of your neighborhood, but what about mamas that live in very large cities?? Holding hand is an option sometimes but there are various situations where that wouldn't be an option (having 3 youngins or a hands full already or a very strong child that wants to get away) its just not safe to chance it! What if someone takes the child that is only 3 feet away in a crowded street or store? Its not always an option to avoid crowded places.
Of course it shouldn't be a babysitter for the child, if the child made it that far then any mother would know, they get into everything, but atleast I know that she wouldn't run off and be kidnapped before I could find her again.

You can't expect a toddler to comprehend that if he/she runs away that horrible things can happen. Sure you can say it isn't safe but most toddlers test their limits, its not like using a leash is a permanent thing, its a safety measure that will be unnecessary once the toddler is mature enough to understand the importance of staying close to her guardian. Just like co-sleeping, just because your child does it longer then what society expects them to, doesn't mean that one day they wont mature enough to sleep in their own room.
jrayn is offline  
#191 of 211 Old 11-02-2005, 02:27 AM
 
Smithie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 4,529
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
I bought a tether, and when ds is a confident walker I intend to offer it as a choice (the other choices being the stroller and holding my hand without pulling). We have a repetoire of places we go where free roaming is OK, but I live in a heavily settled suburban area and our neighborhood streets are just not safe for a kid who doesn't have a strong inhibition about running in the road. And don't even get me STARTED on parking lots and store aisles.

I can't be sure, but I suspect that he will often choose the tether as a way to have a sense of freedom with being truly separated. He is sort of a clingy little guy, but adventurous too. And, in all honesty, if he equates his tether with the dog's leash he will be thrilled. He loves our dogs and emulates their behaviors all the time. Even though he has never been on a tether, I would not be surprised if he thinks of himself as our smallest, most favorite dog
Smithie is offline  
#192 of 211 Old 11-02-2005, 10:37 AM
 
rainbowmoon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Vermont
Posts: 11,138
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
here we go again (I was the OP on the long thread locked over in GD)

it's funny I originally DID vote on this poll that they were evil. boy my tune has changed!!!!! my decision is even more solidified after an incident with DS this weekend with him trying to run in a busy street while we were waiting to be seated at a restaraunt.

still waiting for ours to arrive through the mail, and you can bet your bottom I will be using it!

Blissful Mama to DD-(5), DS-(6) and someone new due in November!
rainbowmoon is offline  
#193 of 211 Old 11-02-2005, 10:47 AM
 
laralou's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: little house in the suburbs
Posts: 4,904
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We didn't use them. I did try because my twins walked at 9mos and refused to be carried or ride in a stroller when in public. But when we put the harnesses on, they lay down and cried, so I took them off and returned them. I made do, but not without sacrifices (ie 3 Amber alerts called at the grocery- I can't run two different directions at the same time). Thankfully we are through with the run and hide phase. I would never judge someone for using one. It is a child safety restraint and imo no different from a car seat.

Now this weekend I was at a really large aquarium and saw 3 different couples using harnesses on their children. The only one that bothered me was the woman that kept tugging on the leash to direct her child. So it is also a case of how you use it.
laralou is offline  
#194 of 211 Old 11-02-2005, 02:30 PM
Banned
 
~member~'s Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: on a lily pad
Posts: 13,061
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrayn
Okay I noticed that your title is "mama in the boonies" which I assume means you live in the "boonies", for you it would seem that allowing your children more freedom would be a safe option as you walk along the road or in the stores of your neighborhood, but what about mamas that live in very large cities??
When I lived in the boonies I had two children. I now live in the cities and have 6 children.
~member~ is offline  
#195 of 211 Old 11-02-2005, 06:41 PM
 
jrayn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Central FL
Posts: 1,614
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamaInTheBoonies
When I lived in the boonies I had two children. I now live in the cities and have 6 children.

More POWER to you! I couldnt imagine doing everyday tasks by myself w/ 6 little 1s!!!!!!
jrayn is offline  
#196 of 211 Old 11-03-2005, 01:39 PM
 
Suzannah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 1,177
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I don't understand why MITB gets a lecture on responding with her opinion, and a mini-lesson on how to express herself, when others in this thread have said worse things that have nothing to do with the topic and been ignored. Lecture one, lecture all.

And, based only on her user name, assumptions are made about MITB's situation, but others would have posters who disagree with leashes castigated for making assumptions about them. Hmmmm. How does that work, I wonder?

HoneyFern

The Blog

Never let your schooling interfere with your education. ~Mark Twain~

Suzannah is offline  
#197 of 211 Old 11-03-2005, 05:37 PM
 
mama2monkeys's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 176
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think leashes are ok.. I use one, i have on all my 3kids & i have 2 now that i use them. I think it all depends on child safety issues & how the individual parents feel.

My oldest was a great walker, i got a harness for her & used it only a handful of times & she learned & liked to walk right next to me. Usually she would hold the cart etc. So she was easy. My middle.. well he is always on it. He runs like the wind & wowowo he is out of sight. I very seldom let him walk even with the harness as my youngest is usually the one who wants to walk. She loves her harness. She will ask me,,, walk mommy harne....
mama2monkeys is offline  
#198 of 211 Old 11-03-2005, 05:51 PM
 
Momma Aimee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: deep in South Texas and ready to go home
Posts: 9,439
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have seen them miss used -- haven't we all.

But -- intheory -- I can't totally write them off.

I do something with my DN that works as well, but gets us looks I hook the "leash" to my belt and he has to hold the handle . if he doesn't hold the handle then he has to hold my hand. he always chooses the 3 feet more freedom on the handle. and my hands are free cuz he is hooked to my belt.

I think there are a lot of things out there are the in an of themselves nertural. it is how they are used, and how the child is treated, that matters.

Aimee

Aimee + Scott = Theodore Roosevelt (11/05) and 23 months later Charles Abraham (10/07)....praying for a little sister; the search starts May 2014
Momma Aimee is offline  
#199 of 211 Old 11-03-2005, 06:52 PM
 
laralou's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: little house in the suburbs
Posts: 4,904
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suzannah
I don't understand why MITB gets a lecture on responding with her opinion, and a mini-lesson on how to express herself, when others in this thread have said worse things that have nothing to do with the topic and been ignored. Lecture one, lecture all.

And, based only on her user name, assumptions are made about MITB's situation, but others would have posters who disagree with leashes castigated for making assumptions about them. Hmmmm. How does that work, I wonder?

I didn't realize when I posted but look at the post dates. This is a thread that was resurrected from an old June thread. I suspect that MITB, as the resurrector, was addressed because this appears to be an attempt to continue a debate that got a recent thread on leashes closed and removed.
laralou is offline  
#200 of 211 Old 11-03-2005, 09:18 PM
 
Suzannah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 1,177
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Ah. Thanks, laralou. I was looking at the dates but then stopped, so that must be it. Thanks.

HoneyFern

The Blog

Never let your schooling interfere with your education. ~Mark Twain~

Suzannah is offline  
#201 of 211 Old 11-04-2005, 01:45 AM
 
jrayn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Central FL
Posts: 1,614
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suzannah
I don't understand why MITB gets a lecture on responding with her opinion, and a mini-lesson on how to express herself, when others in this thread have said worse things that have nothing to do with the topic and been ignored. Lecture one, lecture all.

And, based only on her user name, assumptions are made about MITB's situation, but others would have posters who disagree with leashes castigated for making assumptions about them. Hmmmm. How does that work, I wonder?
Actuall a lot of that person's comments seemed to be not well thought out, I thought that was b/c she didn't understand what it is like to live in a crowded city. I did assume that she lived in the boonies b/c of her title, like my title is jrayn b/c my name is jennifer rayn. Appearantly she no longer lives there but that is not the sole reason that I responded with my opinion on the issue, I guess for subjects like this its best to keep the mouth shut, I just hate the fact that when I have to use one that there will be people out there giving me dirty looks and saying bad things about me when all I care about is the safety of my daughter.
jrayn is offline  
#202 of 211 Old 11-04-2005, 03:17 PM
Banned
 
~member~'s Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: on a lily pad
Posts: 13,061
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Anyway, back to the point of maintaing dignity: While it is perfectly
clear that the use of leashes effects even the behaviour of pet dogs, it
may also be concludable that this has a simmilar (and simmilarly subtle)
effect on human kids.

Yes? No? Possibly? Unlikely? Never thought of it?

I see the leash, while perfectly suitable for maintaining control that
would otherwise have to be done psychologically, an excelent tool to aid
parental arrogance. That is, you no longer deal with various ways to
make your child understand why it should keep safe, instead you simply
phyiscally prevent it from doing anything wrong
.

A "leash" or a "harness", in my dictionary, is something used to
restrain a dog. Will the child seeing himself being treated the same way
as cannines give him a sort of special view of the world. Will it affect
his sense of self-worth?
This lady said it best. Leashes and a child's dignity
~member~ is offline  
#203 of 211 Old 11-04-2005, 03:39 PM
 
Irishmommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: In the bat cave with heartmama
Posts: 45,947
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamaInTheBoonies
Holding hands, carrying your child are ways of creating a human to human bond.
Holding hands gets painful after a while. How long can you keep your arm straight up in the air?
Irishmommy is offline  
#204 of 211 Old 11-04-2005, 04:13 PM
Banned
 
~member~'s Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: on a lily pad
Posts: 13,061
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishmommy
Holding hands gets painful after a while. How long can you keep your arm straight up in the air?
Biologically, children are different than adults. And when I hold my child's hand, their arm is not straight up in the air.
If holding hands causes you or your child pain, then you are doing something wrong.
IMO, it is not okay to cause a child pain, hurt, or confusion.

ETA: Positive reinforcement is something to think about as to why hand-holding is used as an either/or.
~member~ is offline  
#205 of 211 Old 11-04-2005, 04:30 PM
 
Storm Bride's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 27,300
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamaInTheBoonies
Biologically, children are different than adults. And when I hold my child's hand, their arm is not straight up in the air.
DD's is, unless I'm bent over partway at the waist. I have very short arms, and I think dd does, too. I can't walk very far bent over sideways...especially if I have the baby in the Snugli.

Lisa, lucky mama of Kelly (3/93) ribboncesarean.gif, Emma (5/03) ribboncesarean.gif, Evan (7/05) ribboncesarean.gif, & Jenna (6/09) ribboncesarean.gif
Loving my amazing dh, James & forever missing ribbonpb.gif Aaron Ambrose ribboncesarean.gif (11/07) ribbonpb.gif

Storm Bride is offline  
#206 of 211 Old 11-04-2005, 09:14 PM
 
Smithie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 4,529
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
MITB, I can understand why you don't want kids to be forced to wear a thether, but I don't understand why you are so 110% opposed to offering it as an option. We restrain our kids in everything from car seats to strollers to slings, after all, in situations where free roaming is not feasible.

As I said before, my ds is not a confident walker yet, but I am expecting him to choose the tether quite often, even over holding my hand, just so he can be out in front of me playing James the Explorer and having both his hands free to investigate stuff. It seems like many mamas have posted to this thread reporting similar experiences with their dc, and I don't get why that possibility doesn't have any credence to you...
Smithie is offline  
#207 of 211 Old 11-04-2005, 09:41 PM
Banned
 
~member~'s Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: on a lily pad
Posts: 13,061
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smithie
MITB, I can understand why you don't want kids to be forced to wear a thether, but I don't understand why you are so 110% opposed to offering it as an option. We restrain our kids in everything from car seats to strollers to slings, after all, in situations where free roaming is not feasible.
I don't think it's okay to restrain children. It sends the wrong message, that you can't trust them, so why should they trust you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smithie
As I said before, my ds is not a confident walker yet, but I am expecting him to choose the tether quite often, even over holding my hand, just so he can be out in front of me playing James the Explorer and having both his hands free to investigate stuff. It seems like many mamas have posted to this thread reporting similar experiences with their dc, and I don't get why that possibility doesn't have any credence to you...
Children deserve to play without restraint.
~member~ is offline  
#208 of 211 Old 11-04-2005, 09:49 PM
 
Smithie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 4,529
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
If you have ever slung or held a child who was squirming to get down or asking to get down or arching their back or fussing, then you have restrained a child. Even if you were in the middle of a busy street and you turned them loose the second you reached the other side, you kept ahold of them to keep them safe because your own good sense told you they couldn't cross the street safely without your help. It's not so much that you don't trust your kid - it's that you don't trust the rest of the world to make way for him/her.

We ALL restrain our children for their safety, in the way and to the degree that we deem necessary.
Smithie is offline  
#209 of 211 Old 11-04-2005, 10:54 PM
 
TinkerBelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 3,586
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smithie
If you have ever slung or held a child who was squirming to get down or asking to get down or arching their back or fussing, then you have restrained a child. Even if you were in the middle of a busy street and you turned them loose the second you reached the other side, you kept ahold of them to keep them safe because your own good sense told you they couldn't cross the street safely without your help. It's not so much that you don't trust your kid - it's that you don't trust the rest of the world to make way for him/her.

We ALL restrain our children for their safety, in the way and to the degree that we deem necessary.
Smithie, I would not even bother to debate this anymore. Others cannot seem to be civil and respectful of other mamas and this thread is one that was resurrected because of the rudeness by someone causing the other one to be closed and deleted.

Use a leash if you need to. We all do what we think is best for our kids, not what someone else thinks is best.
TinkerBelle is offline  
#210 of 211 Old 11-04-2005, 11:00 PM
 
Smithie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 4,529
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Yeah, but we usually do a better job of respecting each others' judgement than this. :

But you're right, I'm out.
Smithie is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off