Almost time for solids! - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 59 Old 12-20-2006, 03:23 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Okay, so it's still a ways away for my DD, but I have been thinking about it lately. What approach do you all take for starting solids?

With DD#1 I started at six months and used rice cereal w/ BM. I honestly don't even remember what we moved to after that! I know I made it all myself, but I can't for the life of me recall what her other first foods were.

What sort of schedule are you all going to follow and what first foods will you offer?
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#2 of 59 Old 12-20-2006, 03:37 PM
 
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we are starting dd with egg yolks tomorrow. (see weston a price foundation website for the details.)

we are going to mix an egg yolk (boiled for 3 minutes) into her formula every day.

we are going to present her with the option of tasting the egg yolk every day. we are following presentation suggestions by dr. montanaro, a montessorian. we bought a couple little caviar spoons because they are smaller than baby spoons. we will put her little egg yolk in a itty bitty sushi soy sauce bowl. we will serve it to her in another itty bitty sushi soy sauce bowl.

we are starting tomorrow for solstice celebration.

we plan to do the egg yolk until 6 month mark. that gives us 5 weeks to figure out what to do next.
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#3 of 59 Old 12-20-2006, 05:29 PM
 
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nak

Nothing but BM here until they're sitting up steady and grabbing for my spoon.
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#4 of 59 Old 12-20-2006, 05:33 PM
 
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Nothing but BM here either. When he is ready to feed himself (but older then at least 6 months) he can have a bit of what we are having for dinner

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#5 of 59 Old 12-20-2006, 07:01 PM
 
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At least 6 months for Nate.
I tried with my first son at 4.5 months, but he was definitely not ready. We tried every 2 weeks again until a month later when he was more into it.
With my second son I started just shy of 6 months, but he was very big and born quite overdue.
We'll start with organic oatmeal and some ripe banana, then some veggies and finger foods.

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#6 of 59 Old 12-21-2006, 01:37 AM
 
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we'll start offering tastes of ripe banana & ripe avocado in the weeks to come, but we definitely don't have an agenda... just tastes.
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#7 of 59 Old 12-21-2006, 02:11 AM
 
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With dd I started rice cereal at 4mo just like I was supposed to, lol. She hated the cereal so we changed to fruits and veggies and she loved them. I made all my own baby food. Now with ds I think I'm going to wait a bit. He shows no interest at all yet. He still has a pretty strong tongue thrust too. I think I'll skip cereal this time and go straight for fruits and veggies. My dd still eats far more fruits and veggies than any other kid I know so I think it was because she had them from the beginning.
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#8 of 59 Old 12-21-2006, 08:05 AM
 
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We're going to start with fruits and veggies as rice cereal has pretty much no nutritional value to it.
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#9 of 59 Old 12-21-2006, 11:22 AM
 
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Aria had her first lick of food this week but I don't plan on feeding her anything but bm til 6mnths. But she kept grabbing my banana so I let her stick it to her lip. She was quite excited. Them last night she grabbed my banana fruit popscicle and tongued that for a second- the cold shocked her but she LOVED it! I had to leave the room to finish it cause she wanted it so bad. She is definately already grabbing at my food but she's gotta wait.
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#10 of 59 Old 12-22-2006, 05:15 PM
 
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We're waiting at least six months and until he is ready. DD's first food was avocado.

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#11 of 59 Old 12-22-2006, 05:44 PM
 
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I believe in EBF for the first year of life (did it with my first). Not sure what we'll start with at around a year but it won't be grains. I still have 8.5 months to figure it out.

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#12 of 59 Old 12-22-2006, 07:59 PM
 
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Originally Posted by TechnoGranola View Post
I believe in EBF for the first year of life (did it with my first). Not sure what we'll start with at around a year but it won't be grains. I still have 8.5 months to figure it out.
I'm right there with ya!

mom to sam arlo (5), olive loretta (3)....and twin girls Annie and Ramona Jean, born 3/10.

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#13 of 59 Old 12-22-2006, 08:48 PM
 
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Originally Posted by norajane View Post
I'm right there with ya!
i am sooooo clueless on this issue... can folks fill me in on the pros and cons of waiting to start solids for a year?
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#14 of 59 Old 12-22-2006, 09:53 PM
 
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i am sooooo clueless on this issue... can folks fill me in on the pros and cons of waiting to start solids for a year?
Here's a thread about that very subject!

http://www.mothering.com/discussions...d.php?t=580212

Hope that helps!

mom to sam arlo (5), olive loretta (3)....and twin girls Annie and Ramona Jean, born 3/10.

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#15 of 59 Old 12-23-2006, 04:02 AM
 
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With DD1, I started right at 6 months with sweet potatos and breast milk...she had no real interest in food until around 8 months. I imagine we won't even try until 8 months or so with Charlie, given my experiences with DD1.
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#16 of 59 Old 12-23-2006, 12:30 PM
 
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that thread seems to be talking about why to not prematurely wean.
I have no interest in cutting out bm but what are the advantages of EXCLUSIVELY bf? what are the risks, if any, in introducing food too early?
I think Aria would freak if I made her wait much longer- she is already pawing at my plate and squeeling when she sees any food.
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With dd, ped freaked me out about her weight (and she turned out fine! Big healthy girl now!), and so I caved and gave her solids early, but I refused to give her the cereal junk and we started with avocados and bananas. DS has no interest in food, all he wants is boob! I will probably hold off, until he shows me he is ready, and then slowly start to introduce foods to him as he leads me....I simply don't listen to the ped (who thinks I should be freaked because my son is "in the 35th percentile on weight....WHATEVER! )
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#18 of 59 Old 12-23-2006, 02:08 PM
 
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Originally Posted by SummerTwilight View Post
that thread seems to be talking about why to not prematurely wean.
I have no interest in cutting out bm but what are the advantages of EXCLUSIVELY bf? what are the risks, if any, in introducing food too early?
I think Aria would freak if I made her wait much longer- she is already pawing at my plate and squeeling when she sees any food.

: This is from kellymom:


Reasons for delaying solids
Although some of the reasons listed here assume that your baby is breastfed or fed breastmilk only, experts recommend that solids be delayed for formula fed babies also.

Delaying solids gives baby greater protection from illness.
Although babies continue to receive many immunities from breastmilk for as long as they nurse, the greatest immunity occurs while a baby is exclusively breastfed. Breastmilk contains 50+ known immune factors, and probably many more that are still unknown. One study has shown that babies who were exclusively breastfed for 4+ months had 40% fewer ear infections than breastfed babies whose diets were supplemented with other foods. The probability of respiratory illness occurring at any time during childhood is significantly reduced if the child is fed exclusively breast milk for at least 15 weeks and no solid foods are introduced during this time. (Wilson, 1998) Many other studies have also linked the degree of exclusivity of breastfeeding to enhanced health benefits (see Immune factors in human milk and Risks of Artificial Feeding).

Delaying solids gives baby's digestive system time to mature.
If solids are started before a baby's system is ready to handle them, they are poorly digested and may cause unpleasant reactions (digestive upset, gas, constipation, etc.). Protein digestion is incomplete in infancy. Gastric acid and pepsin are secreted at birth and increase toward adult values over the following 3 to 4 months. The pancreatic enzyme amylase does not reach adequate levels for digestion of starches until around 6 months, and carbohydrate enzymes such as maltase, isomaltase, and sucrase do not reach adult levels until around 7 months. Young infants also have low levels of lipase and bile salts, so fat digestion does not reach adult levels until 6-9 months.


Delaying solids decreases the risk of food allergies.
It is well documented that prolonged exclusive breastfeeding results in a lower incidence of food allergies (see Allergy References and Risks of Artificial Feeding). From birth until somewhere between four and six months of age, babies possess what is often referred to as an "open gut." This means that the spaces between the cells of the small intestines will readily allow intact macromolecules, including whole proteins and pathogens, to pass directly into the bloodstream.This is great for your breastfed baby as it allows beneficial antibodies in breastmilk to pass more directly into baby's bloodstream, but it also means that large proteins from other foods (which may predispose baby to allergies) and disease-causing pathogens can pass right through, too. During baby's first 4-6 months, while the gut is still "open," antibodies (sIgA) from breastmilk coat baby's digestive tract and provide passive immunity, reducing the likelihood of illness and allergic reactions before gut closure occurs. Baby starts producing these antibodies on his own at around 6 months, and gut closure should have occurred by this time also. See How Breast Milk Protects Newborns and The Case for the Virgin Gut for more on this subject.


Delaying solids helps to protect baby from iron-deficiency anemia.
The introduction of iron supplements and iron-fortified foods, particularly during the first six months, reduces the efficiency of baby's iron absorption. Healthy, full-term infants who are breastfed exclusively for periods of 6-9 months have been shown to maintain normal hemoglobin values and normal iron stores. In one study (Pisacane, 1995), the researchers concluded that babies who were exclusively breastfed for 7 months (and were not give iron supplements or iron-fortified cereals) had significantly higher hemoglobin levels at one year than breastfed babies who received solid foods earlier than seven months. The researchers found no cases of anemia within the first year in babies breastfed exclusively for seven months and concluded that breastfeeding exclusively for seven months reduces the risk of anemia. See Is Iron-Supplementation Necessary? for more information.


Delaying solids helps to protect baby from future obesity.
The early introduction of solids is associated with increased body fat and weight in childhood. (for example, see Wilson 1998, von Kries 1999, Kalies 2005)

Delaying solids helps mom to maintain her milk supply.
Studies have shown that for a young baby solids replace milk in a baby's diet - they do not add to baby's total intake. The more solids that baby eats, the less milk he takes from mom, and less milk taken from mom means less milk production. Babies who eat lots of solids or who start solids early tend to wean prematurely.

Delaying solids helps to space babies.
Breastfeeding is most effective in preventing pregnancy when your baby is exclusively breastfed and all of his nutritional and sucking needs are satisfied at the breast.

Delaying solids makes starting solids easier.
Babies who start solids later can feed themselves and are not as likely to have allergic reactions to foods.

mom to sam arlo (5), olive loretta (3)....and twin girls Annie and Ramona Jean, born 3/10.

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#19 of 59 Old 12-23-2006, 03:21 PM
 
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Great info norajane!


More from kellymom:

Quote:
Signs that indicate baby is developmentally ready for solids include:

* Baby can sit up well without support.
* Baby has lost the tongue-thrust reflex and does not automatically push solids out of his mouth with his tongue.
* Baby is ready and willing to chew.
* Baby is developing a “pincer” grasp, where he picks up food or other objects between thumb and forefinger. Using the fingers and scraping the food into the palm of the hand (palmar grasp) does not substitute for pincer grasp development.
* Baby is eager to participate in mealtime and may try to grab food and put it in his mouth.
The WHO, AAP, Canadian Paediatrics Society, Health Canada, Dietitians Canada, and other medical organizations recommend waiting at least six months to start solids.

We waited until after 6 months with my first, and will be waiting closer to a year with Liam. I just read that before the introduction of commercial formula and baby food, babies generally didn't eat their first solid until around a year old.

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#20 of 59 Old 12-23-2006, 03:51 PM
 
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I love the info on the Kellymom website. But I still don't see how the info presented translates into it always being beneficial to EBF for 12 months.
I'm not trying to be difficult here, I'm just saying that what I'm reading here seems to point towards 6-9 months as an ideal.

"One study has shown that babies who were exclusively breastfed for 4+ months had 40% fewer ear infections than breastfed babies whose diets were supplemented with other foods. The probability of respiratory illness occurring at any time during childhood is significantly reduced if the child is fed exclusively breast milk for at least 15 weeks and no solid foods are introduced during this time. (Wilson, 1998) Many other studies have also linked the degree of exclusivity of breastfeeding to enhanced health benefits (see Immune factors in human milk and Risks of Artificial Feeding)."

Do you know if there are any studies done for babies exclusively breastfed for longer than 4 months? I've just never seen any and I'd be curious for how long this benefit outweighs the addition of some healthy foods to a child's diet.

"Delaying solids gives baby's digestive system time to mature.
If solids are started before a baby's system is ready to handle them, they are poorly digested and may cause unpleasant reactions (digestive upset, gas, constipation, etc.). Protein digestion is incomplete in infancy. Gastric acid and pepsin are secreted at birth and increase toward adult values over the following 3 to 4 months. The pancreatic enzyme amylase does not reach adequate levels for digestion of starches until around 6 months, and carbohydrate enzymes such as maltase, isomaltase, and sucrase do not reach adult levels until around 7 months. Young infants also have low levels of lipase and bile salts, so fat digestion does not reach adult levels until 6-9 months."

But young babies are usually not fed "adult" foods right away. It seems that even from this info that 6-9 months is an acceptable age to begin some solid food.

"From birth until somewhere between four and six months of age, babies possess what is often referred to as an "open gut." This means that the spaces between the cells of the small intestines will readily allow intact macromolecules, including whole proteins and pathogens, to pass directly into the bloodstream.This is great for your breastfed baby as it allows beneficial antibodies in breastmilk to pass more directly into baby's bloodstream, but it also means that large proteins from other foods (which may predispose baby to allergies) and disease-causing pathogens can pass right through, too. During baby's first 4-6 months, while the gut is still "open," antibodies (sIgA) from breastmilk coat baby's digestive tract and provide passive immunity, reducing the likelihood of illness and allergic reactions before gut closure occurs. Baby starts producing these antibodies on his own at around 6 months, and gut closure should have occurred by this time also."

So again, it seems that 6 months or so would be about the right time to introduce food.

"Healthy, full-term infants who are breastfed exclusively for periods of 6-9 months have been shown to maintain normal hemoglobin values and normal iron stores. In one study (Pisacane, 1995), the researchers concluded that babies who were exclusively breastfed for 7 months (and were not give iron supplements or iron-fortified cereals) had significantly higher hemoglobin levels at one year than breastfed babies who received solid foods earlier than seven months. The researchers found no cases of anemia within the first year in babies breastfed exclusively for seven months and concluded that breastfeeding exclusively for seven months reduces the risk of anemia."

So ditch the iron-fortified baby cereals and start solids around 7 months? That seems about right to me.

"Delaying solids helps to protect baby from future obesity.
The early introduction of solids is associated with increased body fat and weight in childhood. (for example, see Wilson 1998, von Kries 1999, Kalies 2005)"

Still, this study means introducing solids earlier than 4-6 months, but doesn't show a benefit of waiting much longer.

"Delaying solids helps mom to maintain her milk supply.
Studies have shown that for a young baby solids replace milk in a baby's diet - they do not add to baby's total intake. The more solids that baby eats, the less milk he takes from mom, and less milk taken from mom means less milk production. Babies who eat lots of solids or who start solids early tend to wean prematurely."

I think this info would be great for mainstream pedicatricians to know who tend to push 'three meals a day' for 4 month odl babies : , but as long as babies aren't consuming "lots of solids" instead of breastmilk, I don't see any benefit in holding off solids altogether. Besides, maintaining milk production is more about frequency of feedings.

"Delaying solids helps to space babies.
Breastfeeding is most effective in preventing pregnancy when your baby is exclusively breastfed and all of his nutritional and sucking needs are satisfied at the breast."

Sure, in an ideal world. But it didn't work for me, or for a lot of mothers I know. I hate to see new mothers rely on this method entirely and then get surprised by an early pregnancy. But sure, it helps.

"Delaying solids makes starting solids easier.
Babies who start solids later can feed themselves and are not as likely to have allergic reactions to foods."

I have only heard the opposite IRL with regard to the first sentence. Sure, babies can feed themselves, which is great. As for the allergic reaction to some foods, yes, there are numerous foods to "avoid" during the first 1-3 years if you have a family history of food allergies, eczema, or asthma, or if you want to play it safe. But that doesn't necessarily mean ALL food.

Some great info here, but I still don't see it making a case for waiting until 12 months on solids. Although I thinks it's great that many moms choose to wait longer versus introducing food far too early.

- Krista

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#21 of 59 Old 12-23-2006, 04:22 PM
 
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i am sooooo clueless on this issue... can folks fill me in on the pros and cons of waiting to start solids for a year?
I skimmed the other link, and didn't see this posted.

Recent research suggests if you start solids too early (before 4 months) OR too late (after 6-7months) you run the risk of having your child develop allergies. I am sorry I don't have the article, and I am too lazy to look it up.

We are starting on rice cereal at 5 months (plus a week or two)-so pretty much 6 months. The rice cereal is just kind of a "practice" for eating solids...if baby manages to eat 4 spoonfuls its a feast!
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#22 of 59 Old 12-24-2006, 12:16 AM
 
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I, too, have heard that it's best not to do it too early NOR too late...

I started my son at just over 5 months, because he had started nursing like CRAZY (after nursing every 2.5-3 hours), and it continued for a week....I didn't know what else to do....he had all the "signs" of being ready...he'd been sitting up unsupported for almost a month, he was SUPER interested in our food, and he could pick things up, and I discovered that his tongue-thrust reflex was gone...

I started with cereal, because that's what I thought was best...knowing what I know now, I will start with veggies, fruits, and lentils next time.

I started with spoon feeding, and I think I would do the same next time...somehow I just can't get my head around a baby suddenly going from a completely liquid diet, to having to chew...just like that! To me, purees, or mashed foods, make sense.

I started with quite liquid cereal (mixed with breastmilk), and gradually made it thicker. He never ate much to start, just a few spoons....I would only put the food on the end of the spoon, and wait for him to open his mouth. I never, ever shoved food into his mouth. I would hold the spoon in front of him, and when he was ready, he would lean forward and open his mouth.

I will be changing some things the next time around (and I am REALLY hoping the next one waits until at least 7 or 8 months!), but if I spoon feed, I would do it the same way...

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#23 of 59 Old 12-24-2006, 07:35 AM
 
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Recent research suggests if you start solids too early (before 4 months) OR too late (after 6-7months) you run the risk of having your child develop allergies. I am sorry I don't have the article, and I am too lazy to look it up.
This is anecdotal, but my DD who didn't start solids until 12+ months, isn't allergic to anything that I know of (foods, flowers, animals, fabric, etc.). She is 9 now.

If you find this article, I'd be interested in reading it.
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We are starting on rice cereal at 5 months (plus a week or two)-so pretty much 6 months. The rice cereal is just kind of a "practice" for eating solids...if baby manages to eat 4 spoonfuls its a feast!
Everything I've read recently has said that grains aren't the best first food. Have you read anything to the contrary? Here's one quick link from Kellymom which also has reference to LLL and first foods http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/so...rst-foods.html

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#24 of 59 Old 12-24-2006, 01:14 PM
 
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Another reason to skip cereal:

Quote:
“cereals marketed for babies are not sterile and may introduce micro-organisms into the infant's system before it's equipped to handle them.”
http://www.cbc.ca/storyview/AOL/scie...ed_050308.html

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#25 of 59 Old 12-24-2006, 01:26 PM
 
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does anyone know if there is a link to breastmilk sensitivities (ex: i can't eat dairy because it upsets her stomach now, via breastmilk) and allergies later on? i asked my ped this and she didn't have an answer... though i think there IS an answer out there, just not from her!

anyone know?
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#26 of 59 Old 12-24-2006, 02:49 PM
 
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No link, but some anecdotal evidence- I couldn't eat a lot of dairy when my dd was a baby, and now if she eats a lot of dairy, she gets a rash.

Jam 7, Peanut Butter 5, and Bread 2.

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#27 of 59 Old 12-25-2006, 05:01 PM
 
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I have a feeling Louis will be an early eater. He is already showing signs of "solid" food readiness. My oldest started at 5 1/2 months. I was really reluctant to give her anything besides breastmilk, but she showed so many signs of readiness. Finally, I mushed up a banana piece, dh put a little on his finger and she nearly took off his finger!!! My oldest son, on the other hand, didn't start eating solids - at all - until 10 months. My youngest daughter was ready around 8 months. So, we'll see about Louis. My money is on him being ready early - of course, I thought he would be born early, too and he was four days late - sooooooo - I could be wrong!

All the kids have started with banana and avocado. Other first foods were peas, butternut squash, pear, sweet potatoes, and carrots.
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#28 of 59 Old 12-26-2006, 03:27 PM
 
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No link, but some anecdotal evidence- I couldn't eat a lot of dairy when my dd was a baby, and now if she eats a lot of dairy, she gets a rash.
Lucky baby to be breastfed then, she would have had much more trouble on dairy formula! (not saying that formula was ever an option for you!)

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#29 of 59 Old 12-26-2006, 03:42 PM
 
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Originally Posted by the_lissa View Post
No link, but some anecdotal evidence- I couldn't eat a lot of dairy when my dd was a baby, and now if she eats a lot of dairy, she gets a rash.
My DD was like this as well, the smallest trace would give her the worst *diaper* rash and stomach cramps that had her up every 45 minutes crying all day/night long. She outgrew it just after she turned 2 and can now have small amounts of dairy, but for the most part we avoid it day-to-day anyways.

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#30 of 59 Old 12-26-2006, 04:24 PM
 
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Both Dr. Jay Gordon and Dr. Bob Sears say it's fine to wait about a year. I believe they debunked the theory that one can start solids too "late" at Kellymom...because that study was about a certain population of special needs children and the findings did not apply universally.

The World Health Organization found that babies who start solids at 4 or 5 months become ill more frequently with infections than those who wait until 6 months. Starting solids early is not just a digestive issue but involves the immune system as well.

Most or all of my post has references at http://www.kellymom.com

Bon appetit!

Take the time to heal from your marriage before you move on with someone else. Make a list of all the qualities you would like in a new partner and then work on growing that way yourself. ~mandib50
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