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#1 of 39 Old 09-04-2013, 10:30 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Hello. I see a few other mamas asking how to handle rages and über-rudeness in their children. No solid advice that works for us so far, though. When 5yo DS has his rages, I am really struggling on how to handle it. I've lately been attempting to be closer and do time-ins. But it is very hard to accomplish with a 2yo who gets extra clingy during DS's tantrums. It's hard to even GET close to him safely to attempt a time-in, and her clingyness often will cause him to escalate. He's big for 5 and very strong. It feels so aweful to restrain him, and it doesn't help. But he is also the type to violently oppose being separated from us when he's mad. If I try to keep him in or out of a room for physical separation to let him cool down a bit, he kicks the door and throws stuff. It's a really miserable time when these bouts occur. It's been occurring quite a bit lately, and I can't seem to find a right way for us to diffuse easily. Any ideas? I just wish I could lock him outside and hide in a closet with DD sometimes. It's scary and hard for all of us. What can we do? I've tried revoking privileges along with the other stuff I mentioned, just to see if he would respond. But that also escalates. Help! I need some mama magic!
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#2 of 39 Old 09-06-2013, 04:41 AM
 
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I got none, but wanted to say HUGS!!!  If you can, try and nip it now... we've gone through this off and on with my 8 year old and it definitely doesn't get any easier!!  (If I find a magic solution though...I'll come back...  at 5, i was thinking he'd just grow out of it as he matures and we just handled each one the best we could and talked after.... )

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#3 of 39 Old 09-06-2013, 07:55 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks. I'm just now reeling from a huge episode this morning. Oh, the stress and drama!

I wonder- is it wrong or shaming to explain to him just how negatively his behavior affects all of us around him? I actually broke down crying and told him straight up "This is a problem we really need to solve. I can't handle being yelled at and hurt every day when you get mad. I want to help you learn to control your anger, but I can only help if you'll listen to me and try the things I said ( like running around outside or taking deep breaths). Everything that everyone does affects other people and things. When you act out your anger with a mean voice and body, it hurts all of us. It's not ok for you or anyone else to behave that way for any reason."

Was that a strong enough message? Too much? He's content and calm now, thankfully. I can't very well break into tears to repeat that spiel again, but I fear it wasn't a lasting effect. I want to honor his needs, but I won't let him ruin our days with all this. Clearly he has some huge feelings or needs to meet, but I can't figure out how to get him talking so I can help him.
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#4 of 39 Old 09-07-2013, 07:11 PM
 
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The book Peaceful Parents, Happy Kids has  LOT of great advice on how to deal with strong emotions and rages in kids.  

 

As for what to do during a rage - first you have to figure out how to keep yourself calm.  Then you calmly stay near - just be present.  He needs to know that he won't be left alone to handle his emotions, and that he doesn't scare you away when he gets out of control.  You need to be an anchor for him, which can't happen if you're getting upset yourself.  Will the younger sibling sit on the floor with you and stay still?  

 

If it doesn't upset him further, you simply say what you see and empathize in a calm voice - "You are so mad about ______.  I can see that you are very upset.  I'm here to give you a hug whenever you are ready for it."  

 

Then after he's calmed down and you have reconnected (via cuddles, hugs, deep breaths), you can talk about what happened and how to handle it differently next time.  "You were very angry.  Getting angry is okay, we all get angry sometimes.  I love you even when you're so angry you can't hear me.  But it is not okay to kick and throw things.  Let's think of other things you can do when you feel yourself getting mad."  If he has input on the ideas (like maybe he wants to punch a pillow or jump on a trampoline instead of doing your ideas, which becomes just another directive), then he's more likely to stick to them.  Then you can remind him of your conversation when you sense a rage coming on.  

 

anyway, the book is really great for emotional coaching, I highly recommend it.  




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#5 of 39 Old 09-07-2013, 07:29 PM - Thread Starter
 
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If it doesn't upset him further, you simply say what you see and empathize in a calm voice - "You are so mad about ______.  I can see that you are very upset.  I'm here to give you a hug whenever you are ready for it."  


This I do try, and it hasn't worked very often. I do and plan to keep trying.

Then after he's calmed down and you have reconnected (via cuddles, hugs, deep breaths), you can talk about what happened and how to handle it differently next time.  "You were very angry.  Getting angry is okay, we all get angry sometimes.  I love you even when you're so angry you can't hear me.  But it is not okay to kick and throw things.  Let's think of other things you can do when you feel yourself getting mad."  If he has input on the ideas (like maybe he wants to punch a pillow or jump on a trampoline instead of doing your ideas, which becomes just another directive), then he's more likely to stick to them.  Then you can remind him of your conversation when you sense a rage coming on.  

Great suggestions! I just learned that asking if he wants to play his drums would help him. It was a sudden suggestion I blurted out in a mild disturbance. The next time he started getting edgy, he self-directed right to drums!

anyway, the book is really great for emotional coaching, I highly recommend it.  
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#6 of 39 Old 09-07-2013, 10:36 PM
 
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Mama, what, if any, are his triggers?
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#7 of 39 Old 09-07-2013, 11:03 PM
 
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Thank you so much for posting this. This sounds exactly like my daughter, and I have the same reaction. I also have an (almost) 2-year-old that needs attention during the meltdowns. Rages are a better way to describe it though, as is uber-rudeness! 

 

She has been a challenging child from the start, and I know that she will challenge me always. I just wish I didn't have to feel one step behind all the time. 

 

Have you read Raising Your Spirited Child? I found that really helped me in reframing how I thought about my daughter. which helped me be more patient and detached during rages. 

 

So many hugs, Mama Amie, I know how difficult it is to be in this position - wanting to parent gently, but not knowing what else to do. 

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#8 of 39 Old 09-07-2013, 11:03 PM
 
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I am so going through this with my almost 4 DS. Following!!

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#9 of 39 Old 09-07-2013, 11:04 PM
 
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Oh, and I wanted to add that I don't at all have anything figured out about how to deal with the rages. I feel like she terrorizes our whole house sometimes. I'm going to check out that book reccommended by a PP and stay tuned for more suggestions. Thanks all!


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#10 of 39 Old 09-08-2013, 07:26 AM - Thread Starter
 
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It looks like I need to amp up my reading again. I've been reading Unconditional Parenting, Peaceful Parent, Happy Child, and How to Tslk so kids Will Listen. I also recently read Raising Your Spirited Child and Skimmed The Explosive Child.

I loved where they all come from, but we still struggle with having real workable tools in the heat of the tantrum. I've seen someone suggest re-framing our view of the child into how we would respond/react to a 2 year old. It definitely helps to remove any notion that he is in control or able to control himself once the switch is flipped. Distraction, such as asking some random unrelated question has helped him get out of the spiral a bit, and suggesting drums before it gets bad was successful. I do feel we're learning and making progress a bit. But it takes practice and vigilant mindfulness to really implement the new ideas.

IRT the question about his triggers:
Anything at all can trigger him lately- if I made a mistake with how I prepared his food, or any instance where I cannot or will not immediately do his bidding. He's real big into wanting me to do for him things he can do well himself- wipe bottom, put on shoes/clothes, buckle his seatbelt, find his missing whatever... All it takes is one unavailable moment to send him over.
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#11 of 39 Old 09-08-2013, 07:43 AM
 
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Good suggestions - just wanted to add that our 4yo is prone to these rages, and we dealt with the same thing when our 7yo was younger.  For both boys, when I tried time-in's, the feeling of being restrained made them freak out even worse, with violent thrashing around, like a caged animal - the last time I tried that, I got head-butted right in the nose. Not fun. So we had to resort to sit-in's with them in a corner, talking to them soothingly and keeping them from hurting anyone or kicking the walls until they calm down enough to be rational.  On the other hand, 2yo DD seems to crave the physical contact when she goes into meltdown mode, and holding her helps, even if she fights it at first. shrug.gif

 

4yo DS had a meltdown going into preschool class last year -  they had just fired and awful assistant teacher, and Josh was having anxiety issues with school because of her. So we showed up to find the new assistant teacher there (who, for the record, is SUPER sweet, as is the lead teacher), and DS had a total freak-out when I went to leave. The new teacher tried to hold him on her lap while talking sweetly to him, and I saw him gearing up for "atomic explosion mode" because he felt restrained. So I quickly intervened, and explained his reaction while thanking her for trying. I just sat on the floor with him next to her chair, and loosely put an arm around him and rubbed his back while I tried to distract him by soothingly talking to him about which of his friends were there, what the teacher was saying about their activities for the day, etc. He gradually calmed down and I was able to say goodbye and reassure him I'd see him soon. The teacher was amazed how well my method worked - she said "Wow, you knew just what to do with him!"

 

What helped us the most was figuring out their triggers! Believe it or not, diet is a HUGE issue with our kids - meltdowns and rages happen frequently if they stray from their "clean" diet and sneak in anything with gluten, dairy, soy, foods high in salicylates, artificial additives and preservatives, etc.  (check out sites like www.fedupwithfoodadditives.info and www.salicylatesensitivity.com to see if your DS has symptoms of food intolerances that could be causing these rages.)  Sensory processing issues can also play a part - SPD is no joke! If he's craving a certain type of stimulation such as needing to bang on the drums, or getting too much sensory input that he can't handle, that can trigger meltdowns too (7yo has issues with this). Other big triggers for them are anxiety, feelings of inferiority (such as, 7yo is dyslexic and at age 5 started feeling awful about his school work), feeling hurt when they've been corrected on behavior or manners, etc. - of course, these are difficult emotions to deal with even for adults, even harder for kids, and harder still when their whole system feels unbalanced from eating foods their little bodies can't process. Once we figured this out, it became easier to head off rages before they start, reduce how frequently they occur, and lessen the severity when they do happen.

 

Hope this helps!! Good luck! :Hug

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#12 of 39 Old 09-08-2013, 08:41 AM
 
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Hugging it out never really works with my 4 yo but I at least try to stay down at her level and hold her arms if she's starting to lash out. Sometimes her tantrums ebb and flow so I pretty much have to stay right there and continue to empathize and soothe her until she starts to cry. When she cries, that means the anger is subsiding and its on the downhill slope.
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#13 of 39 Old 09-18-2013, 11:26 PM
 
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very interested in continuing to hear how this goes, as i am planning to unconditionally parent my child and, if they are anything like me, they will be high-needs, and tantrums are a real possibility. but i'm only interested in hearing how other unconditional parents handle it, since i am 100% convinced this is the best way to go and, as you will not be surprised to hear, i am still wondering about real-world applications to particularly hairy situations, since the book is more theory than anything else. i have a few more books to read soon, and i'm going to give the ones suggested in this thread a look, too.

so, honestly, i have been wondering to myself, does a kid parented with a very attachment & unconditional style really end up being the sort of kid who will throw tantrums? trying to believe the answer might be no, but that seems to be naive thinking, and now that i found this thread, i'm sure of it!

here's what i'm curious about: is the rage always personally aggressive? does he seem angry at the people around him? one of you in particular (like, is he mad AT YOU when you, as you mentioned, make a mistake with a food item)? or is it more like random flailing? i'm just trying to get a better mental image of what's going on so hopefully i can better learn from it.

i've dealt with my nephew's tantrums before, when he was 4 and 5, and it really seemed that he wasn't mad at ME, and as soon as i could show him the "bad guy" was some external force that he and i could rage against together (in other words, when he was convinced i was acting in solidarity), he not only calmed down, but an exceptionally tender & emotionally needy side of him would quickly surface, and it became such an apparent contrast between the monster moment and the bewildered baby moment.

so i've been setting up this mental landscape regarding tantrums, that (a) i kind of have a grasp on defusing them, and (b) my kid who will (unlike my nephew) get attachment & unconditional parenting, will most likely be "better behaved" (for lack of a better term) to begin with. again, i know i might be incredibly naive about this! kids' temperaments seem remarkably independent of their upbringing sometimes.

(edited: oops, it's "defuse", not "diffuse" ... http://grammarist.com/usage/defuse-diffuse/)

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#14 of 39 Old 09-19-2013, 09:17 AM
 
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My DD has really violent tantrums. Not often, but when she does its really bad. I hug her with a blanket, if she wont stop coming at me, or destroying everything in her path. I used to lose it with her, but now I stay calm and in control until it passes. I would feel myself losing control and try to give myself a time out, so I could take a break but she would just slam into my door repeatedly. If I let her in she would punch, hit, and tell me she hates me. I have snapped and spanked her. It never helped the situation. Then I would feel terrible. Now I hug her with a blanket and tell her everything I love about her. It helps me stay in control to tell her this. It kind of annoys her, but when she reflects on it later, she will remember me telling her good things about herself. She struggles and tells me to let her out. I ask, are you ready to stopping hitting and throwing? She actually gives me an honest answer when I ask.  When she gets to the point of tears I know its over. We cuddle, we talk, and then she usually sleeps. She will grow out of this, and all I can do is keep her safe, and teach her about triggers and coping skills in the meantime. Since I started doing this, the tantrums and become few and far between.

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#15 of 39 Old 09-19-2013, 09:35 AM
 
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DS has been getting angry with his sisters and it seems like we are all frustrated with each other atm. Sometimes I will try to get laughs out of him by stomping and singing "the angry song" (my sister made it up) in a monster voice. A-N-G-R-Y! Angry! Usually he smiles a little and uses a whiney voice to let me know the problem. What isnt clear to me is how to get him to share an activity with his sister before she gets frustrated and wrecks his design : / Has anyone had success with a playful approach? Maybe a bean bag angry game or go outside and stomp packaging bubbles?

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i keep hearing so many people saying that their kids are saying "i hate you" and to anyone with personal experience, do you know where they learned this? i am going to be so careful with my language around my kid, of course, but fear it may be hard to shelter them entirely from negative attitudes. any thoughts?

btw, when i say no negative, i mean we are planning not to even use the word "no", and never plan to say "i don't like [xyz]" (if my wife says "here, you want some asparagus?", i won't crinkle up my nose b/c it sounds gross, i'll smile and say, "hmmm, you know what i'm really more in the mood for? some hazelnuts! yummmm!" and then we both give off a positive/affirmative energy). let's just say we think this is a worthwhile experiment at not exposing the kid to attitudes of rejection or opposition. we have no idea, having yet to try it, how it'll play out.

but i can't imagine any of you have modeled the" i hate you" stuff, right? so where does it come from? in other words, what do you recommend we not expose the little one to so they don't learn what yours unfortunately already did? or, feel free to laugh at me & say so, if you don't think it's possible! orngbiggrin.gif

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#17 of 39 Old 09-19-2013, 07:34 PM
 
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I have no idea where my son learned it. Actually, he doesn't say I hate you, he just says, "I don't love you anymore!" :'-(

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Originally Posted by filamentary View Post

i keep hearing so many people saying that their kids are saying "i hate you" and to anyone with personal experience, do you know where they learned this? i am going to be so careful with my language around my kid, of course, but fear it may be hard to shelter them entirely from negative attitudes. any thoughts?

btw, when i say no negative, i mean we are planning not to even use the word "no", and never plan to say "i don't like [xyz]" (if my wife says "here, you want some asparagus?", i won't crinkle up my nose b/c it sounds gross, i'll smile and say, "hmmm, you know what i'm really more in the mood for? some hazelnuts). let's just say we think this is a worthwhile experiment at not exposing the kid to attitudes of rejection or opposition. we have no idea, having yet to try it, how it'll play out.

but i can't imagine any of you have modeled the" i hate you" stuff, right? so where does it come from? in other words, what do you recommend we not expose the little one to so they don't learn what yours unfortunately already did? or, feel free to laugh at me & say so, if you don't think it's possible! orngbiggrin.gif

 

Good luck!! I would find it impossible, and I am not sure how well it would prepare them for the real world, but we all have different philosophies.

 

We dont censor ourselves as much as we should. I have never told her I hate her, but I have said I hate things, like traffic, splinters, etc.


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#19 of 39 Old 09-19-2013, 09:46 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I am sure my son learned hate from hearing it in non-personal context. Certainly a few kid books have influenced, and likely some tv. We have been AP from the start, but kids pick up stuff from everywhere, no matter how sheltered they are. Naturally, he tries out the meanest and scariest things he can come up with during his bouts of rage. The rages come up from various triggers. Sometimes he wakes up grouchy, sometimes it is power struggle. Brushing teeth and respecting little sister's nap needs are most frequent triggers, though others do come up. We try to offer love and hugs and other positive ways of diffusing rage, but it is rarely simple or easy.
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#20 of 39 Old 09-20-2013, 02:59 AM
 
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I have no idea where my son learned it. Actually, he doesn't say I hate you, he just says, "I don't love you anymore!" :'-(

whoa! i'm guessing that's just as hard to hear! duly noted. :P

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#21 of 39 Old 09-21-2013, 07:11 AM
 
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Hello. I see a few other mamas asking how to handle rages and über-rudeness in their children. No solid advice that works for us so far, though. When 5yo DS has his rages, I am really struggling on how to handle it. I've lately been attempting to be closer and do time-ins. But it is very hard to accomplish with a 2yo who gets extra clingy during DS's tantrums. It's hard to even GET close to him safely to attempt a time-in, and her clingyness often will cause him to escalate. He's big for 5 and very strong. It feels so aweful to restrain him, and it doesn't help. But he is also the type to violently oppose being separated from us when he's mad. If I try to keep him in or out of a room for physical separation to let him cool down a bit, he kicks the door and throws stuff. It's a really miserable time when these bouts occur. It's been occurring quite a bit lately, and I can't seem to find a right way for us to diffuse easily. Any ideas? I just wish I could lock him outside and hide in a closet with DD sometimes. It's scary and hard for all of us. What can we do? I've tried revoking privileges along with the other stuff I mentioned, just to see if he would respond. But that also escalates. Help! I need some mama magic!

You've described my nine-year-old. We've got holes in walls, gashes in doors, and just this morning I had a rock hit me in the back of my head. My DS is a really sweet and loving kid except for when he's not. It's very scary and often unpredictable. The unpredictability is the hardest part.
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#22 of 39 Old 09-21-2013, 11:36 AM
 
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my dd 2yo almost 3 does the same thing. Physically restraint definitely puts her more aggressive and locking her in a room terrifies her. I try to stay close until she starts throwing things. Then I tell her firmly and loudy (without yelling) that I am leaving because I don't want to get hurt. Then she usually relaxes and calms down and comes looking for me immediately afterwards. I don't get it, I don't like it, and I hope that I am doing what's right.

 

I think all we as mothers can do, is love our children. Ride the storm with them as long as no one gets hurt and be there to help pick up the pieces and talk about it later when all is calm. I am sorry you are going through this and I hope that things get better for you.

 

I wish I had something better to say.

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#23 of 39 Old 09-21-2013, 02:31 PM
 
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I would HIGHLY recommend looking closely at diet. Food allergies and sensitivities really can cause crazy intense behavior. Common culprits are too much sugar and food additives especially food dye. When you've eliminated everything that has high fructose corn syrup and artificial ingreds look next at wheat, dairy, soy, corn. There are tons of great gluten free subs now easily available even at regular grocery stores. 

Blessings on your journey!

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#24 of 39 Old 09-23-2013, 02:45 AM
 
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Yeah, I use to think also that we should work on tantrums BEFORE they appear, like "if you give your child a "proper" parenting, this shouldn't happen so often, right?"

 

WRONG!!

 

Kids have loooots of frustrations daily, of course the parenting type helps A LOT, by teaching how to deal with those feelings and all, but it doesn't prevent your child from having this behavior sometimes.

 

I think the main problem is that we are still thinking that "OUR" kids will be like an automatic machine that responses to what WE do, or teach. But that is wrong, they are independent beings (yes, very dependent, but I mean they are a different person), they are not our "results". We still think it is about us ("if they have this I have done something wrong", or "if they don't behave like that I have certainly done something right"), and I really think it isn't. The moment we can really detach from that thought, I think is when we can really start to helpe them without guilt, anger or pride (when they behave "exactly as I want to").

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#25 of 39 Old 09-23-2013, 05:00 AM
 
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I am guessing you do not have a child yet. You may never say no to your child (highly unlikely) but other people will. Your child will experience disapproval and frowns from others.

Young children need direction and clear expectations. They need to know their parents are in charge and guiding and protecting them. It is very scary for a two year old not to have clear limits and boundaries. They need them to feel safe and secure. They need life to be predictable. Attempts to negotiate with a child under five will often fail. They do not have the cognitive ability to negotiate. Children under seven can only see things from their own perspective and are unable to put themselves in someone elses shoes.

I am an attachment parent and love my kids unconditionally. I offer high nurture and high structure.

With my first child I was a very permissive parent, and he was my unhappiest child. Soon after number three was born I became a single parent and I had to change my parenting style in order to be an effective parent. My style was still attachment, highly nurturing but I was also a very much in charge parent to meet my kids needs.

I think all my kids have told me they hate me at some point.Angry kids say hurtful things. Children learn from the world around them as well as from their parents. SO unless you are going to live in isolation from society your child will learn from other children and adults, from the media  etc.

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#26 of 39 Old 09-23-2013, 05:23 AM
 
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Dealing with rages is challenging. If you understand what triggers the rages then you are better placed to deal with them appropriately.

It sounds to me like some of your child's rages are triggered by not getting his own way and are an attempt to control you. If he rages, tantrums because you do not respond to his demands immediately I suggest you calmly tell him you will only respond to polite requests and walk away from his tantrum. Completely ignore his screaming etc. Calmly tell him you will talk to him when he is calm. Suggest he goes to his calm down spot, this can be a soft chair or cushions on the floor.

Later you can talk to him about ways to express his negative feelings appropriately. Screaming at mom is not appropriate. As the mom you need to make sure his tantrum does not work by giving in to him.

You may need to explain to him the difference between needs and wants and have him practice showing some patience when you do not immediately respond to his demands.

Does he only rage in front of you or does he do this at school or with his friends. My daughter kept her rages for home. I could stop a rage very quickly by reaching for the video camera and saying I was going to show her teacher and ask her advice.

I think you have had some really good suggestions. Check his diet, give him a fish oil supplement daily..

Reduce any stress in his life. Keep it simple and minimise activities outside the home and see if it helps. Make sure he is getting plenty of sleep and exercise. After a rage tell him he needs a nap as he must be very tired after all that raging.

Restrict his screen time and be very selective about what he views.

It will pass but it is so hard to stay calm and not let a rage ruin your day.

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#27 of 39 Old 09-23-2013, 06:36 AM
 
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I actually came here to post about the same thing- my DS (who will be 3 at Christmas) has raging tantrums and has generally been a high-maintenance child from birth.  It's funny, because he is an extremely happy, well-adjusted, charismatic and well-liked child in our neighborhood.  He does amazingly well out of the house and with others- at home he is a challenge.  Lately he has been pushing me to my limits- not only do we deal with the daily "I want this, I want that, I need this now, do it this way" every 2 minutes (which requires enough patience as it is), along with his high activity level and constant demands for attention, but he has become pretty noncompliant, challenges our limit-setting and has also suddenly become very "lovingly rough" with his 6 month old sister.

 

Our disciplines techniques have been a combo of time-outs and time-ins, I suppose. We've done time-outs in his high chair in the past, but usually we remove DS from the situation and take him to his room immediately when he hits or does something aggressive, or after he has been given warnings/redirected for his behavior and continues to do it. That usually triggers a rage. I know it's frustration and being thwarted from what he wants to do. We typically stay with him unless I need a time-out for myself to regain control (which is often) or his rage is so aggressive that it is better to leave the room.  However, even when we are in his room with him, he will throw his body against the door or throw his toys at the door. Restraining him makes things worse, as many said here.

 

I'm wondering, aside from the great advice posted here, how to manage my OWN emotions in these situations so that I can manage his better and take better control of the situation. We've had some transitions lately- I'm back at work FT, mother-in-law moved in to take care of kids and HOVERS over me constantly, so my patience is thin in general. I feel I need to do better at regaining control and not feeding into the trantrum b/c of my own lack of patience. DH and I have even started to yell which we've never done before. I'd love to be able to set my son up for success to avoid these rages because sometimes I think I do exacerbate them.

 

Sorry OP that I don't have advice of my own- I appreciate you bringing this topic up and need to notes.gif   so that I can start using these tactics that have worked for others.

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#28 of 39 Old 09-23-2013, 07:20 AM
 
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I was thinking if maybe it would help to not see the tantrum itself as "misbehavior". Ultimately, the child is suffering from being in a very confusing time in her/his life. He/She wants independence and needs mommy at the same time. His/her body is changing and a feeling of being out of control is there, kinda like having PMS, being pregnant or going through menopause. The emotions are BIG and they come out in big ways sometimes. When I am able to think of it this way I can detach myself and not scold him for the emotion. After all, I WANT him to not be afraid/embarrassed/or humiliated by his emotions. I think you can show a child that hitting or getting physical is not okay without punishing the tantrum itself. I try to do this, but I fail a lot. I don't think that not punishing for the tantrum will mean the child always throws tantrums into adulthood. In fact, I think repressed emotion will result in more explosive behavior as adults than allowing them a safe place to express themselves in a safe way.

There was a comment above about reaching for a video camera and telling the child that you can show the teacher the tantrum. Isn't that threat of humiliation? I didn't quite understand that.

For what it's worth, I think the goal of not saying "no" is a noble goal. I think if you can do it then go for it. I believe it can be done while also setting clear boundaries and making a child feel safe. If I were more able to deal with my own reactions and emotions then perhaps I could stop saying "no" so much. I feel like that's all I say to my child sometimes.
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#29 of 39 Old 09-23-2013, 08:21 AM - Thread Starter
 
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JeanetteHannah, I appreciate your perspective, but all your suggestions tend to intensify and escalate his upsets. There is no "calm down" spot that he will accept. The best I've found in that regard is asking if he will go play his drums until calm, staying home is a complete disaster most of the time. He does have days he prefers home, but this kid is very extroverted and prefers to be out in the world. He saves most of the rages for home, though he has lost it in front of his friends before. He will not be ignored. He is as tenacious as can be, especially when upset. He violently rejects any attempts to ignore his tantrum, and will kick down a door if I try to lock him away from me and his little sis. The only thing left is to stay close and wait calmly for it to pass. Sometimes I will walk outside, but if he refuses to follow, he's likely to start destroying things. He is just really intense. He seems to have mellowed a bit lately, so I suspect it was a growth spurt. I tend to forget how they can affect him. He had also been napping far less/waking earlier ( yes, he still naps in general). I do not allow unhealthy foods, but grains and wheat do get eaten. No artificial ingredients, HFCS, and very minimal sugar/honey. I tend to be very controlled about sweets, and I allow on occasion ONLY when we have plenty if space and time to run it off.
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#30 of 39 Old 09-23-2013, 12:50 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I definitely feel that my main need is in keeping my own composure during this stuff. It is very easy to push me into fight or flight with these rages, since I really do feel powerless to control it. It's a very real and abusive dynamic, but I have to remember not to take it personally or react from my feelings of frustration or hurt. I have to learn to weather the storms well, to reconnect ASAP after, and ( so important) find a way to address the scenario during calm time. It is important to me that he begin to see how that affects others around him and how it all gets worse before it gets better. I want to help him learn to go play drums or whatever calms him down BEFORE exploding, so he can use problem solving to negotiate or get needs met.
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