Pixie Sticks for breakfast? Why or why not? - Page 3 - Mothering Forums

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Old 12-06-2007, 04:16 AM
 
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Pixie Stiks:

I confess, I'd be a total hypocrite and ask my kids to eat something with complex carbs and/or protein first. (But I've been known to sneak candy before breakfast, especially when I'm PMSing . But then my kids are pretty sensitive to swings in blood sugar (so am I, but I've got enough brains to follow up pixie stiks with yogurt and kashi), so it's a really bad idea.

Scary movies:
I appear to be in a minority here in that my opinion is that kids ought not to be exposed to violent media until they are much older than most people think is OK. (I'm talking 6-7 for Disney movies minimum, and 10-12 for PG movies.)

I'm as controlling in this regard as some parents on MDC are about food that's in the house. (I do view limiting what's in the house as a control issue; since you buy the food, you control what's available, even if you don't control it once it's in the house. I'm much more lax about food that comes in.) We simply don't have videos or watch shows that are violent. Ever. My 3 1/2 year old has never seen a movie. My 6 1/2 year old has seen one movie: Cars.

I do this because I believe the research that says that exposure to violent media is bad, and because my kids are highly visual learners (ds especially), and scary images stay with them for a long time. We were at Penney's the other night getting pictures taken for the holidays and they had a waiting area with a movie. They were playing some stupid Disney movie that was rated PG ("The Pacifier"). Dd watched 2 minutes and literally ran away in terror.

So, this would be a case where I could say "I think this is too scary for you" and my kids would agree it's a bad idea. But even if they wanted to, if they're not old enough to meet the rating, i.e. it's PG (parental guidance) and my parental guidance says "NO", then "no" it will be. Ds had nightmares from some book they were reading in 1st grade!!

Clothing with writing on the butt:
Not with my money. If they want to earn/save their own money and buy it, then they can look stupid.

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Old 12-06-2007, 04:18 AM
 
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Originally Posted by natensarah View Post
Whoa! I don't think that's fair. I'm not trying to do anything of the sort. I HAVE had this same discussion before on MDC, though, and there was a large contingency or moms who thought that toddlers/preschoolers could handle scary/violent movies as long as they were prepped and it was "discussed". And by scary/violent, I mean Spiderman, X-Men, Batman, etc. So I apologize if I've offended you by lumping in with those moms. Maybe that's not what you're trying to say.

What I was trying to say with my swimming pool argument is that information is not enough. So if your dc wants to go to a scary movie, and you tell them, "I think this will scare you. It will be gory and gross and it'll be very hard to remember that it's just pretend," and they still want to go, I wouldn't let them.

I guess what I'm trying to point out is that children are still children, whether you live consensually or you're authoritarian.DePolarizing, if you will.
:

one of my issues with some of the approaches parents take to GD is that I'm a firm believer in developmental readiness. And sometimes a child just isn't developmentally ready for some experiences, or to be able to negotiate some things.

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Old 12-06-2007, 04:26 AM
 
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ITA with Lynn. It's my job to take into account my ds's developmental readiness for many things. A friend of mine has a nearly 5yo that just can't do playdates right now...for a number of reasons. It's just not helpful or positive for him or anyone else. I try to really tune into my kid as well as take overarching guidelines into account. ITA that media should generally be limited. Lots of kids are allowed to play video games, but research shows that it stimulates the same part of the brain as cocaine...not what I want for my child's precious brain. Just because something is out there and others are doing it doesn't mean it's a good idea for my kid. I see my role as protecting him from this stuff until he is ready to make his own decisions based on sound information.
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Old 12-06-2007, 04:42 AM
 
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I don't know if this has been brought up yet or not, but age really factors into this for me. I can see by age 8 allowing my child to choose whether to have sugar first thing in the morning, because he will have had several years of experience in knowing how it makes him feel. But a 3yo? No. My 6yo? Maybe. There are some mornings I allow him to have crap first thing, and sometimes I don't - if we're fighting off a bug I explain to him about sugar lowering his immune system and that we're working on keeping our bodies really healthy right now. It affects the whole house when someone gets sick. Heck, it even affects the whole house if one person is acting like a brat because they are flipped out from only eating sugar that morning. (I've been that person, even as an adult, btw.) If we have to leave early because he has soccer or something, then we may not have time to get around to eating the egg once the initial sugar excitement is over.

Movies? Again, depends on the age. My 6yo has terrible nightmares and gets scared very easily, so I would not allow him to watch something I knew would scare him. But then I doubt he'd want to, since his first question is usually "Is it scary?"

Clothing? If I'm buying it, I get to draw a line. If he's buying it with his own money, there still might be limits, and there would be a lot of discussion.

In GD circles I'm probably considered a little controlling, but in mainstream circles I am most definitely considered wayyyyy too lenient. I constantly have other parents/teachers/adults shocked that I let my children make so many of their own decisions, or make decisions based on their input. But in this forum, I would most definitely be considered one of the more conservative parents.
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Old 12-06-2007, 04:57 AM
 
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Hmm, just because I don't allow pixie sticks for breakfast does not mean I beat my kids.

No scary movies until age 12 or so.

No skimpy clothing unless at the beach!


Philomom is not a tyrant. Her kids love her and find her mostly reasonable but they know there are some things that are "out of bounds" for our family. They can make different choices for their families when they are grown.
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Old 12-06-2007, 05:43 AM
 
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Pixie Stix for breakfast?

Sure, but the only time we have candy in the house is right after Halloween. My rule is "eat whatever you want for 5 days and then we take it to my parents' house and grandpa will eat the rest"
5 days out of 365 isn't going to hurt anything.
The other day, we had cake and hot cocoa for breakfast.... and we won't have cake in the house for another 10 months, so it's not really a big deal, in my book.

Scary movies?

No, because the boys wouldn't want to watch them anyway. If I say "It's gonna be scary", that ends the conversation. If they *really* wanted to watch one, I'd probably let them. IMO, if a kid likes to be scared (my niece is like that), then it's easy for them to remember that it's fake. If a kid doesn't like to be scared (like my DS), then it's not an issue. They just won't ask (and will tell you you've got the TV too loud if you're watching one in the other room )

Clothing with stuff on the butt.... I have boys, so they don't ask for it. DS does like the t-shirts at Target with snotty sayings on them and we discuss each one individually. As long as it's my money we're spending, then I get the final say. If he has $12 of his own money, then the conversation is different. He's had several gift cards over the years and has yet to buy anything I disapprove of, though. Usually, he asks my opinion & I give it & he ends up buying candy or a video game.
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Old 12-06-2007, 10:50 AM
 
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But it's such a provocative and assumptive stretch...why would your small child 'insist' upon watching Texas Chainsaw Massacre? Folks give these examples, but they are so rarely (ever?) based on actual experiences.
Well, no, not Chainsaw Massacre....that is pretty extreme. But there have been times when I've simply had to say "no" to a dvd. In our case it was when I was borrowing Queer as Folk from our library. We would go to the video room after choosing our books, and dd and I would each choose our dvds. They have the full QaF collection , so I eventually borrowed them all! Dd got used to seeing these, and was curious about them. She wanted to watch "my movie". Every week the same thing (and she was 4-5 at the time...), "can I watch your movie with you, mommy? Why not?" (I watched after she was in bed, asleep). Now, QaF certainly would bring up some great conversations if watched with a 15 yo.....but it is simply Not Appropriate for a small child. And she was completely unable to understand that at the time. So the answer, in the end, was No.
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Old 12-06-2007, 11:01 AM
 
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It is entirely possible to respectfully say "no" to your child. Sometimes, ime and imo, it is the more respectful thing to do.
I agree. If asked, DS will request ice cream when ever it's time to eat. Does he get it? No, not for meals but sometimes as a snack. When asked what he wants Santa to bring for Christmas, he says ice cream, so I'm thinking of letting him have ice cream for breakfast that day! DH was flabbergasted when I told him my plan

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Old 12-06-2007, 11:54 AM
 
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ITA about developmental readiness. As I thought about the "writing on the butt" example, FI, I realized that while it would be an absolute no for my 9yo, who is unquestionably not old enough to be choosing to sexualize herself, I probably wouldn't forbid it for my 16yo (although she would definitely hear my opinion on it), because I understand that 16yos are, appropriately, by their developmental nature, emerging sexual beings.

Quote:
I appear to be in a minority here in that my opinion is that kids ought not to be exposed to violent media until they are much older than most people think is OK. (I'm talking 6-7 for Disney movies minimum, and 10-12 for PG movies.)
ITA, Lynn. Actually, one of my own early memories involves being completely terrified by a Disney movie. I think I was 6.

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If a kid doesn't like to be scared (like my DS), then it's not an issue. They just won't ask
I dunno about this. My parents let me watch The Exorcist on TV when I was...11ish--because I insisted I could handle it. I didn't sleep that night. I remember crying in the bathroom, I was so scared.

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Old 12-06-2007, 12:15 PM
 
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Good conversation and very interesting!

I'm laughing right now. My kids are eating ice cream for breakfast. It's the feast of St. Nicholas. I totally dropped the ball and wasn't prepared (the kids put out their shoes the night before and get treats from St. Nicholas). We live in the middle of nowhere so there was no place to run and pick something up. Dh went to our little mom and pop store (only one in town) and got the kids ice cream, jerky and cookies. The boys ate their jerky before the ice cream which is good. Ds2 has blood sugar issues. They requested mac and cheese for breakfast which is cooking now. So yeah, once in a while we have treats for breakfast, but it's not in the house very often. Their pretty reasonable about eating something good first. They get a ton of say in their food choices. My mother would be horrified. Of course, I have healthy choices for them to choose from....

Movies: we have lots of discussions about how some movies aren't appropriate for kids. They know dad and I watch movies after they go to bed. We don't have scary or inappropriate movies that we own. The only two are the Lord of the Rings and the Passion of the Christ. Both way too intense for my kids 7 and under. We compromised on the LOTRs and they got to watch the "making of" documentary. They are definitely trusting of us when it comes to scary movies. They get a lot of leeway in choosing what they want to watch from what's available. (Right now they are obsessed with MacGyver)

Clothing: Well, this one's a sticky one. We try and hold a certain standard of modesty. Right now Dd1 is stricter than I am. DH is way more authoritarian than I am, he wouldn't want our girls wearing anything "indecent." We have and will continue to have lots discussions about clothing. There is a lot of compromise and very little control about clothes though. Basically, once it's in the house, I don't control when or how they wear it. Sometimes I'll give DD pointers about matching if we're going out. I just don't buy (or keep that's given to us) clothes that aren't modest. I am soooooo much more lenient than my parents were. We were forced to wear clothes that we didn't like and basically had no say. Weren't allowed to wear pants etc. DD gets that we give her a lot of leeway so if some pants are really tight and low cut, she trusts us that it's in her best interest to not wear them.

I have found that I don't have or want to lay down the law with my kids. We have an awesome working relationship. They make requests that for the most part are granted and I make requests that are for the most part granted. If there's an issue, we compromise. DH is coming around, it's just taking a while! I'm ok with kids having boundaries, and so are they. It's just not a dictatorship IYKWIM!
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Old 12-06-2007, 12:56 PM
 
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I think most small children will trust a parent who is trying to work with them. I also do not know any small child of 4 or 5 yrs old who has engaged in these sorts of chats who doesn't trust their parent when they say, "I think this will give you terrible nightmares".
Maybe my kid was just slower with the cause and effect, or maybe he's more vulnerable to peer pressure than all of your kids....

But no, my older child started arguing back about certain media around 5-6. "Why can't I see Revenge of the Sith?" "Because it was made for older people. You didn't like Aladdin because it was scary, right? Well Sith is way scarier than Aladdin."
"But Sam has seen it! Sam says its so cool!"

Now, based on previous experience, I knew that Sith was way, way, WAY too much for my kid. Nightmares and weeping way too much. But he was just responding to hsi friend boasting about having seen it and "my mom lets me watch lots of stuff."

The pressure on boys, especially, to "toughen up" starts really, really early. I know lots of parents who have shown little boys stuff that they clearly were not ready for, and there's often a subtle "Don't be overprotective! He's a boy! HE needs violent scary media!" vibe when you say that you're not ready for Sith, or Spiderman, or Transformers... I'm sure there are kids who are more than ready for it, who are unaffected by it -- but I'd rather err on the side of caution in this regard. Because its not like you can take it back and erase it if it turns out to be harmful.

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Old 12-06-2007, 01:00 PM
 
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Interesting thread!

Candy: We don't generally have a lot of candy in the house, but if we did I would certainly let my dc eat it before breakfast. Sometimes my brain needs a sugary jump start, so I imagine their brains do too.

Movies: It would depend on the movie, I guess. Right now, dd1 knows that there are movies for her and movies that are for Mom and Dad only.

Clothes: I like the idea of buying them but only wearing them around the house. Eventually I will talk to the girls about clothing choices. If we lived in a perfect world they could wear whatever they wanted. However, we don't live in a perfect world, and I don't want them advertising something that they are not ready for.
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Old 12-06-2007, 02:52 PM
 
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Maybe my kid was just slower with the cause and effect, or maybe he's more vulnerable to peer pressure than all of your kids....

But no, my older child started arguing back about certain media around 5-6. "Why can't I see Revenge of the Sith?" "Because it was made for older people. You didn't like Aladdin because it was scary, right? Well Sith is way scarier than Aladdin."
"But Sam has seen it! Sam says its so cool!"

Now, based on previous experience, I knew that Sith was way, way, WAY too much for my kid. Nightmares and weeping way too much. But he was just responding to hsi friend boasting about having seen it and "my mom lets me watch lots of stuff."

The pressure on boys, especially, to "toughen up" starts really, really early. I know lots of parents who have shown little boys stuff that they clearly were not ready for, and there's often a subtle "Don't be overprotective! He's a boy! HE needs violent scary media!" vibe when you say that you're not ready for Sith, or Spiderman, or Transformers... I'm sure there are kids who are more than ready for it, who are unaffected by it -- but I'd rather err on the side of caution in this regard. Because its not like you can take it back and erase it if it turns out to be harmful.
This is an interesting perspective. I'll have to watch out for that as my boys get older. I agree with erring on the side of caution. We have some friends who are Star Wars junkies and their dd was quoting Star Wars by the time she was three. I honestly think that at age three it was probably too hard to tell what was happening to be scary, but now she's five and she must be somewhat de-sensitized. That's kind of icky to me.

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Old 12-06-2007, 03:07 PM
 
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I've found some TV programming to be an excellent way of discussing current events and certain topics wth my kids (And ok, no, we do not 'need' TV to have good discussions. lol) . Will and Grace, fi, humanizes gays...and is a great antidote to certain insantiy of certain other media. Same with Simpsons. People think the message is Bart telling his mother to kiss off, and it isn't.
Thank you for mentioning Simpsons. I generally feel pretty awful when ds watches it. lol. If I'm flipping channels, and he sees it, I leave it there. Ah well. lol

Candy- maybe. I guess it would depend on my mood. Ds would be pretty amenable to a deal like "you can have candy now, but then something relatively healthy." But some days, I start (mindlessly) off with "no" then don't want to change my mind because of ds's fit...
I'm sure dp would allow candy for breakfast, and do the talking and discussion, etc etc.

Scary movies- at 3, I can say that I wouldn't allow scary movies, but also that I'd pretty much guarantee that if I told ds it was too scary, that he'd choose not to watch it. I can see myself saying "no" to scary movies in the future, even if ds thinks he's ready. He's really sensitive, especially to scary music. I don't even watch CSI around him (but I do have some g-rated csi substitutes to tide me over. lol)

sexy clothes- no. very much no. It wouldn't happen, at least as far as I could control it(I only have a boy, but...).
I dressed sexy when I was a young teen. I am so frickin' icked out by it. Teens (and especially younger) just don't get how sick minded some men can be (is that sexist? I guess women could be sick minded too.) I was doing it to impress the boys my age, which is fine. But there were adult men fantasizing about me, because of my clothes. (eww...I want to be sick). Yuck.
I'd be hard pressed to allow a girl to wear a bathing suit at the beach. I might be convinced into that, though.

Though...pants with words on the butt...I don't know. I guess it might depend on how tight the pants were, and what word it was. Words like "slut" would get a "heck no."

Now, all black goth type clothes? I'm cool with that. Strong fashion statements, sure. Most clothes, with the exception of hateful words (even dp would forbid anything even remotely racist), would be ok.

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Old 12-06-2007, 03:30 PM
 
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That's just not how I'd handle the scary movie. My daughter wanted to see Lord of the Rings. I'm quite sure she'd get terrible nightmares. So she and I talked about it - she said the movie sounded good (she loves sci fi) but that she didn't want nightmares. I remembered something about animated LOTR movies from some time way ago, and we ordered those for her. She was quite happy with that. We found a solution that gave her absolutely everything she wanted and none of what she didn't want.

It's about being open minded and finding solutions. We set up these false dichotomies sometimes - he wants to see Texas Chainsaw Massacre and I don't want him to see it - when maybe the answer is to find a movie that's a little scary but not *that* scary. Kids often want to see something that's a bit scary, and there are plenty of movies that are scary enough to be fun but not terribly scary. You don't want your kid to watch that particular movie? Say why, give some alternatives that you'd be more comfortable with, see if he has alternatives that might be good. You might be able to reach an agreement rather than imposing your will or letting him do something you know he'd regret. (General you here - I don't think this was anyone's real life circumstance.)

With the candy - my daughter has learned that she needs protein for breakfast. But if she has an interest in something sweet, we do try to find a way to meet that and still get protein in her.
:

A couple of years ago my answer to these things would've been "no way!" But I'm learning now that not only do my kids usually accept my guidance when I listen and explain, but also that there's this big, wonderful, creative, satisfying middle ground. There's this middle ground where my kid gets to say "I want candy for breakfast, it looks good and I feel like having something sweet" and I get to say "I'm concerned that you'll be cranky if you eat candy before having some healthy food, I wonder if we can find a way for you to have something sweet and get the protein/healthy food you need to have a good morning," and we find a solution that addresses both my concern and hers. It's a middle ground where it isn't just either you do what I want you to do or you get your own way even if I don't agree/like it. This is a place where my kid can want to watch that movie, and I can find out what interests him about it and talk about how scary it might be and how that might affect him, and we can look into solutions that address both his concern/interest and mine-like finding movies that aren't as scary but still satisfy his interests.

Wrt the sexy clothing, a friend of mine had a preteen dd who went out wearing a thong sticking out of her jeans. This mom was not happy about it but did not forbid it. Instead she talked very frankly about how people tend to/might perceive people who wear things like that, and how her dd wanted to be perceived, and her own concerns as a mother, and so on. And this girl decided not to wear that anymore (and no, I don't know how/why she got the thong in the first place). I liked this approach, because it didn't set up this big power struggle. It was giving information and guidance in a way that encouraged trust and openness between mom and daughter, which allowed the daughter to welcome and value mom's guidance.
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Old 12-06-2007, 03:37 PM
 
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Joining this thread late... but DS had chocolate for breakfast this morning. Specifically it was a homemade mixture of raisins, peanuts, and about 6 chocolate chips... which with the peanuts and raisins I feel is probably actually better than the trader joe's waffle he often has. pixie sticks I'd probably try to talk him out of. Even at this age he seems receptive to "first we eat dinner, then we can have chocolate".

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Old 12-06-2007, 03:56 PM
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Absolutely not. To ANY of it.




Har har, it's me folks. Yes, I would allow all three if it came down to either allowing it, or setting up a huge power struggle and me communicating the message to dd that I don't trust her to make choices regarding her body and herself.

Now, as another poster pointed out (UUmom I think) there is a world of choices and options between NO WAY or "here, my two year old... I brought home Texas Chainsaw massacre...let me lock you in a dark room and force you to watch it!"

The sexy messages written on clothing is the one I would be the most peeved at to tell you the truth -- I'd probably go a little hard @ss on that one and tell her she has to pay for them herself (out of birthday/Christmas/allowance money or whatever, which she would have access to) because I don't feel comfortable spending my money on such things, but in the end I wouldn't forbid it.
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Old 12-06-2007, 04:05 PM
 
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These all really boil down to one issue: When would you intervene to prevent your children from suffering the natural consequences of their choices?

So many factors come into that! Age, development, personality, relationship to the parent, ability to understand the potential consequences, how severe the consequences are, etc. Pretty much everyone agrees that you would at SOME point- like letting your kid run into the street or play in the pool alone. But beyond that the line is sometimes difficult to pin down.

For me:

Pixie sticks FOR breakfast? No. (at least not until you're old enough to make your own breakfast, then maybe I'll butt out). Pixie sticks WITH breakfast? Sure.

Scary movie? Maybe. My son's too young for me to deal with this yet, but I'd be willing to let him watch something like that to 1. See if he can deal with it 2. Allow him to experience the consquences so I can better explain why he can't do it again if he asks.

Nine year old girl with "Bootylicious" written on the butt of her jeans? No way. A nine year old probably isn't capable of understanding the ramifications of the sexualization and objectification of women in general and young girls in particular. Of the three, this is the hill I would choose to die on.

And yes, I would try other things before stomping my foot down and saying THIS IS HOW IT IS, but after explaining and offering alternatives and brainstorming, those are things that I *would* put my foot down on. Theoritically. Years from now, when my kids are old enough for these situations to happen :
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Old 12-06-2007, 04:37 PM
 
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With my 7 year old, if I say "I'm really not comfortable with that" it provokes a good conversation about whatever it is. Ultimately, this stuff ends up being her decision, but she really listens to me regarding my concerns. So far, I either end up agreeing with her or she ends up agreeing with me, or simply not doing something because I'm not comfortable. I also sometimes don't do things because she's not comfortable.

When she's 9 it might be different, but at least I'm getting my good thinking about stuff available to her now. And she doesn't like clothes with writing on it. Honestly, the kid has pretty good sense.
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Old 12-06-2007, 05:02 PM
 
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I am completely comfortable with my choice to tell dd she could not watch Queer as Folk with me when she as 4 and 5 (after vague conversations about why it is not appropriate for children). But out of curiosity....how *would* you explain that to a 4 yo? (the content is a lot of graphic sexuality, often in back rooms of gay clubs....great stuff , but not gentle and not loving).

I mean, I don't really want to explain *why* she can't watch, because even the *why* is inappropriate imo. And since I was borrowing these during our weekly library visits, it came up a lot! So she just had to accept that it was "not for children".
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Old 12-06-2007, 05:07 PM
 
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I don't know what Pixie Sticks are, but I have a sugar addict (and I formerly was one) so I know whereof I speak. IMO, anyway.

My kid gets too many sweets. But we have a rule that you have to eat 'real food' first and no sweets in the morning. I have also started buying mostly health food store sweets for at home, in small quantities.

I do believe, actually I would say I *know* that sugar is biologically addictive and children cannot be expected to regulate their intake without adult assistance. Eating sugar leads to a blood sugar high, then collapse, and a biological imperative to eat more sugar to re-stabilize the system. The less sugar (and other high glycemic sweeteners) they eat, and the more protein and other good foods they get, the more stable their system will be.

Lately I have managed to convince my kid that french toast is a sweet. MAJOR for that one. She helps make it, we make a mixture of milk, cinnamon and one egg per slice of bread (using low glycemic ezekiel bread), and then she eats it with maple syrup. Tastes fabulous, maple syrup is high glycemic but has food value, and she is getting actual food, fibre and protein to balance some of the sugar overload. Major step up for us.
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Old 12-06-2007, 05:33 PM
 
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Absolutely not. To ANY of it.

:
Now, as another poster pointed out (UUmom I think) there is a world of choices and options between NO WAY or "here, my two year old... I brought home Texas Chainsaw massacre...let me lock you in a dark room and force you to watch it!"

.
I think a lot of people here think that's what we're doing if we let our younger kids watch LotR or Star Wars. I really think they envision us propping their eyelids open, making them watch gory movies while we play "Ode to Joy" in the background, out of an intentional desire to desensitize our kids.
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Old 12-06-2007, 05:35 PM
 
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Originally Posted by sunnmama View Post
I am completely comfortable with my choice to tell dd she could not watch Queer as Folk with me when she as 4 and 5 (after vague conversations about why it is not appropriate for children). But out of curiosity....how *would* you explain that to a 4 yo? (the content is a lot of graphic sexuality, often in back rooms of gay clubs....great stuff , but not gentle and not loving).

I mean, I don't really want to explain *why* she can't watch, because even the *why* is inappropriate imo. And since I was borrowing these during our weekly library visits, it came up a lot! So she just had to accept that it was "not for children".
sunmama....Q as F is too scary for me because I hate watching gay bashing in media and I got really tense watching a few episodes 'cause it seemed like someone was going to get bashed.

Now the L Word....honestly, I only watch that stuff when the kids are sleeping.

And I think that's something that gets overlooked a bit. I'm willing not to have things around that I don't want my kids exposed to. I have a tremendous amount of control over what gets introduced. When it does come up, I voice my opinions about it and often we come to a compromise.

For example, I don't like characters for a bunch of reasons. My kids sometimes get Pooh and Hello Kitty stuff, which for some reason bug me less than the Disney Princesses and Cars and such.

One of the reasons I told my kids I don't like them is that they are designed by the marketers to "go out of style" forcing kids to buy more stuff.

Then, when a kid teased my kid about some Care Bear thing 'cause they were "out" she just kind of nodded at me about it.

I can see that having good long interesting conversations about my thoughts and feelings on any number of topic and limiting my own exposure to marketing and scary stuff has had a powerful positive influence on my kids.
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Old 12-06-2007, 05:45 PM
 
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I think a lot of people here think that's what we're doing if we let our younger kids watch LotR or Star Wars. I really think they envision us propping their eyelids open, making them watch gory movies while we play "Ode to Joy" in the background, out of an intentional desire to desensitize our kids.
Oh, that's wrong?

I think I did tell Monkey, "No way, dude. It's NOT for kids." about some cartoon that came on on "Adult Swim" (nighttime programming in Cartoon Network or something). Simpsons are OK, but Futurama (I think) about had my eyes pop out of my head!! But b/c he knows most kids don't watch stuff like Desperate Housewives and other stuff he does, when I tell him something isn't cool like that he's OK w/ it.

And he doesn't like blood. So we try to avoid anything bloody for his sake.

I have throw my hand over his eyes or FFed when some scary movie preview comes on MTV at night if he's in the room. But appreciates that b/c even though he likes some scary........THAT is TOO scary! Even the previews make me quake!
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Old 12-06-2007, 05:49 PM
 
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sunmama....Q as F is too scary for me because I hate watching gay bashing in media and I got really tense watching a few episodes 'cause it seemed like someone was going to get bashed.

Now the L Word....honestly, I only watch that stuff when the kids are sleeping.

And I think that's something that gets overlooked a bit. I'm willing not to have things around that I don't want my kids exposed to.
Yes, I only watched when she was sleeping, too. But I borrowed the dvd's from the library during our weekly library trips (they don't have the L word, but I love that series too! . Our habit was to spend a bunch of time reading and choosing books, then walk over to the dvds. I would pick mine, and dd would pick hers. She was always at my side because, well, dd never left my side at that age (her choice). It got to the point that she could lead the way to the QaF shelf

Since she was so used to seeing me check them out, she was curious. I never actually watched them when she was awake, but she was asking to watch them anyway.

I dunno. I'm not willing to only check things out of the library that are appropriate for her to watch....that wouldn't work for me. But I do agree that it is good to save the actual *watching* until she is in bed.
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Old 12-06-2007, 05:54 PM
 
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Pixie Stix for breakfast? I wish. My son has a rare inborn error of metabolism called Glycogen Storage Disease type 1a (glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency). He is unable to convert glucose 6 phosphatase to glucose so he is dependent on a continuous supply of glucose. In our case that is raw, uncooked cornstarch via bolus feeding every three hours around the clock. His diet is very strict-ABSOLUTELY no sugar, no fruit, no dairy. His body cannot convert any of the sugars in these things so he doesn't ever get them. He is in constant danger of profound, life threatening hypoglycemia, lactic acidosis, seizures due to hypoglycemia, and death if intervention is not available for him. So, if his disease is ever cured and he can have any of these things-yep, pixie stix for breakfast. You can be sure of it. In fact, my promise to him is that if he is ever cured, we are going to put a table cloth in the middle of the living room floor and eat whatever he wants. He has requested Hershey bars, apples, grapes, regular syrup, and a bag of sugar just so he can dip the spoon in it and eat it of the spoon.
Scary movies-if he is so inclined, I guess he could if he asked and I sat with him. I let him watch family guy with me so I can explain it when he has a question. He is really fascinated more with Baby Stewie's thoughts about world domination.
Writing on the butt-no. He's not asked for that but does want me to make a shirt for him that says "gross". He doesn't know why though.
Sorry for the novel. But yeah, I would SO let him have a pixie stix for breakfast and can't wait for the day I can serve him one a silver platter.
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Old 12-06-2007, 06:16 PM
 
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Would many children feel full on a Pixie Stick? Wouldn't they want some yogurt to go with it? An egg (and my first posts talks about an egg...) would negate the Pixie Sticks.

Of course, I know most people at MDC don't have Pixie Sticks in the house...but what if you did...that one time in a zillion years? I mean, how serious is the candy for breakfast situation, and how often would it even come up?
My children wouldn't get full of pixie sticks, but they'd instantly be totally insane with sugar and wouldn't want to eat anything else. So, ala Barbara Colorosa..."You may have a pixie stick as soon as you've eaten something healthy."

Heather married to my highschool sweetheart 6/7/02 :cop: Mother to Dani age 14 and Timmy age 10 Nadia 1/29 :
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