What to do when your dc doesn't like dinner? - Page 4 - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#91 of 109 Old 01-29-2008, 12:12 PM
 
Jescafa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 305
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
LOL, I actually do make myself eat stuff I hate. I'm not a fan of green veggies, but I eat them to set a good example, and because I know my body needs them.

That said, I too do not agree with "eat what I serve or go hungry." We always offer straight-outta-the-fridge alternatives. I'm a grown-up and choking down some green beans is not going to make me throw up or manifest itself with major food issues later in life; it might for my kids. As long as they have a reasonably similar replacement (carrots, fruit), I'm fine with that.

I draw the line with forcing myself to eat broccoli though. DD1 believes that I don't eat it because I'm breastfeeding. So I have to keep breastfeeding until she leaves home. LOL.
Jescafa is offline  
#92 of 109 Old 01-30-2008, 06:14 PM
 
cancat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 564
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
haven't read the replies but we:

-encourage dd to try things
-don't make a big fuss if she doesn't try them
-don't make her eat anything (obviously)
-don't use dessert as a reward/punishment
-offer her something that she doesn't hate but that isn't her favourite either if she won't try what's in front of her (ie, raw carrots, apples) as long as it doesn't require much work (this is not a restaurant)

Offer her a snack at bedtime of the things she didn't try at dinner (maybe she wasn't hungry?) along with some other healthy things (nothing like ice cream, for example).
cancat is offline  
#93 of 109 Old 01-30-2008, 07:40 PM
 
tooticky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: North Vancouver
Posts: 1,265
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I totally agree with not using dessert as a reward/punishment.... but I have a question:

I love to bake. I make nice desserts quite frequently. Ds likes to help me...

DS is getting pickier and pickier by the hour, and at this point really doesn't like anything for supper. I don't force him to eat, but I don't make anything else for him, telling him that he can choose to eat dinner if he wants to. (We make things that he has wolfed down in the relatively recent past - I'm not cooking things that are outlandish!).

I don't want to deny him sweets, but I also feel strongly that he needs nutritious foods before eating a treat.

We usually wait until after he is asleep to have dessert.

I have considered offering him these desserty things earlier in the day... Maybe after lunch if he has eaten a decent amount of "real" food.

What are your thoughts?

Erin, mommy to ds April 2004 and dd : February 2007
tooticky is offline  
#94 of 109 Old 01-30-2008, 09:12 PM
 
heartmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: In the bat cave with Irishmommy
Posts: 6,252
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
tooticky--I'd focus on baking healthy treats with him. It's only natural that he would ask for the sweet treats he helped you bake. If he is losing his appetite for heathier foods--make desserts that are very nutritious. Some children can understand having sugar desserts after a meal, not as a reward, but as a way to fuel their bodies with healthy foods before filling up on sugary treats. But I don't think a young child will always understand this reasoning, and if you child balks at healthy food while clamoring for sugary stuff, I would definitely go to the root of the issue and replace the sugary stuff with healthy options. You might check out the Moosewood Cookbook and other natural whole foods cookbooks for sweet and healthy treats. Anything with nut butters, yogurt, honey, and fruit as a base will be sweet and healthy. Rice makes a great healthy base--rice pudding made with whole eggs and brown rice and honey is yummy! The options are endless.

Mother is the word for God on the hearts and lips of all little children--William Makepeace Thackeray
heartmama is offline  
#95 of 109 Old 01-30-2008, 10:29 PM
 
Cujobunny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,430
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by heartmama View Post
tooticky--I'd focus on baking healthy treats with him.
ITA. There's a recipe on this site (Peggy's Kitchen on the homepage) for Banana Oatmeal Cookies that have no flour, butter, any dairy or sweeteners of any kind

Amanda - wife to DH Kellyjog.gif, Mummers to Trentreading.gif born 03/03/05 Bridgetdust.gif born 08/08/07 and a IT'S A BOY! Kennedy babyboy.gifborn 02/20/11!
Cujobunny is offline  
#96 of 109 Old 01-30-2008, 10:34 PM
 
heartmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: In the bat cave with Irishmommy
Posts: 6,252
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
On the topic of food we made only healthy foods available, fed ds when he was hungry, and didn't feed him when he wasn't hungry. My general philosophy is that children should have those healthy foods available to them which are available to their parents. The only caveat is that parents do not have unlimited time to bake everyone separate meals, so with very small children, I definitely would stock the pantry repertoire with those foods which can be offered with a minimum of fuss. I really have never understood carefully controlled meal planning, unless we are talking about a family that needs to feed a lot of people on a very limited budget. There again, the parents and kids are in the same boat, and we are not talking about withholding available foods. There is certainly no shame in not having a fridge full of alternatives to give a child at each meal--but the truth is that many of us posting here do have extra's like packaged yogurt, peanut butter, fruit, noodles, or eggs, which are just sitting there in the fridge and could be made available to a child who doesn't want to eat the lasagna. When you have the food but don't want the kids to have it, it becomes a discipline issue--but that is very different than simply not having extra food. I find there is a lot of subtle nudging in these threads which hints: parents in the first category can, with mealtime rules, imbue a child with the kind of unquestioning gratitude and appreciation for "what's on the table" which would naturally develops when food is scarce, or hard won.

The problem, though, is there actually *is* more food available in these homes, and the discipline issues that develop are almost entirely the result of this fact. The child knows there is more food. They can see it plainly, in the fridge, or the cabinet. The only thing more frustrating that not having much food in the house, would have to be having food in the house, but having someone else tell you when and what you may eat.

Instead of feeling grateful for what mom prepares, kids often feel frustrated and resentful. Depending on the personality of the child, and the flexibility of the parent, a lot of the frustration may be easily placated with creative meal planning and lots of table variety. But whatever happens at the table, the parent often doesn't get back the kind of appreciation they want for their cooking, planning, and coaxing.

The second problem is that this kind of value for eating whatever is set before you may be quite harmful to children raised in affluent societies. It's hard to think about ourselves as affluent, but most of us posting here are wildly affluent compared to many of the people living in the world. Many people on earth could not begin to imagine having something *different* for dinner each week. The variety in our diets, the cleanliness of our food, is beyond the wildest imaginings of many other families on earth.

Ds will never learn gratitude by having available choices withheld. Just like I won't learn to appreciate what I can buy in the store by having the manager blockade various aisles at random. It would take a total catastrophe of deprivation to experience gratitude this way--a flood washing away all the stores, for example. I don't think most of us want to re create total deprivation in order to get our kids to the place of feeling humbly grateful for whatever crust is set before them. I have found it's very easy to foster gratitude in ds by simply stating aloud my own grateful thoughts, and encouraging him to do the same. "I'm so glad we have peaches today--they are my favorite fruit" said by me, might result in ds saying the next week "Oh I'm so glad we are having spaghetti, that's my favorite!". I also talk about our budget and show him exactly how much there is to spend and what food costs. Ds often spontaneously says 'Oh thank you mom for getting me this treat!" or 'Oh thank you for making pizza tonight!". With little prompting he seems to have developed a very natural appreciation for the food he eats.

But lets say that you could creat an atmosphere of thankful, compliant gratitude in the home by having lots of rules....your child would eventually have to go out into a world of excess and overwhelming food choices. Children who must live in that world--the world most of us here live in--need us to help them develop the skills to thrive among such excess.

Why not work with the knowledge our children possess instead? Why not help them make wise food choices in the home, so that they will be prepared to think critically and logically for themselves outside the home? Little one's are easily overwhelmed. We can help them by bringing home healthy foods, and make sure the alternatives are full of "yes"s rather than "no"s. Talk to them about what their body needs. Don't make a big deal out of food phases. Engage them in problem solving. Lead by example. If boundaries are needed, let them be short term solutions, while actively helping your child towards success with self discipline. Realize that good eating habits are a lifelong challenge for people in affluent societies. Obesity is a crisis for those in first world countries. Our children will probably never reach a point where they are "done" learning how to eat better and healthier--who here hasn't had to change something about their own eating habits in the last five years? It's a lifelong process. Good nutrition is so important, and requires active problem solving, critical thinking, and the ability to make good food choices. I think it's important to begin with a healthy food environment (breastfeeding, whole foods in the home) and work with our children as they grow and develop a greater awareness of food choices.

I have written a book here--I'm done--thanks for reading this far

Mother is the word for God on the hearts and lips of all little children--William Makepeace Thackeray
heartmama is offline  
#97 of 109 Old 01-31-2008, 08:01 PM
 
warriorprincess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Peoples Repub. of Treacle Mine Rd
Posts: 1,638
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jescafa View Post
LOL, I actually do make myself eat stuff I hate. I'm not a fan of green veggies, but I eat them to set a good example, and because I know my body needs them.

.
See, I do this too. I would eat nothing but meat,cheese, and carbs if I ate what I wanted- not healthy. I force myself to eat spinach and broccoli.
warriorprincess is offline  
#98 of 109 Old 01-31-2008, 11:44 PM
 
chfriend's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: in a red state
Posts: 4,754
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cujobunny View Post
ITA. There's a recipe on this site (Peggy's Kitchen on the homepage) for Banana Oatmeal Cookies that have no flour, butter, any dairy or sweeteners of any kind
I can't find it....do ya have the link, perchance?
chfriend is offline  
#99 of 109 Old 02-01-2008, 01:11 AM
 
dflanag2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 478
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We talk about eating a variety in our house. DS is 3.5 and he loves grains... fortunately all we have are whole grains! He will eat whole grain cereal for breakfast, then want a whole wheat tortilla for a snack, then crackers, then bread at lunch with his sandwich, etc, etc. (He also eats other foods in there, I am constantly inserting fruit/veg/dairy/meat/protein into/alongside the grain)

I typically let him eat what he wants, but when he asks for seconds on carbs, I remind him that we need to eat a variety, and ask what else he would like, then give him some non-carb options. We tell him he needs to eat a variety of foods to be healthy and grow. We don't quantify any food, I just want to encourage him to eat more than one thing at each meal. I aim to offer 3-5 foods at each main meal.

Same with dinner--he will inhale the dinner roll with butter, then ask for another, and we will remind to eat a variety before eating a second roll. He usually complies. He is a great eater, but typically his big meal of the day is a late lunch (2-3 PM we're talking...) so I make a point to make lunch a really good meal for him. He will occasionally help me cook, but will often not eat what we make, for whatever reason, I'm not sure why.

Sometimes I think it isn't an appetite thing as much as a sensory overload thing:
Tonight I made Turkey Tetrazzini with some leftover turkey breast and at first he wouldn't touch it. I had him bring his plate to my seat and started pointing to individual items in the casserole. Mushroom? No, didn't want it. Piece of turkey? "Yes, I love turkey!" ate it. Whole wheat spaghetti? Ate 6 bites, interspersed with the onion, green bell pepper, and pimento that was included. And the sauce was a cheese sauce. He was happy to eat it, and liked it after the individual ingredients were pointed out to him. (well, it helped that I was feeding it to him too, he likes that.) The big blob of casserole mixed together was overwhelming to him.

DD is 17 months and ate as much as she could get into her mouth with the baby fork (the rest was on her front). It cracks me up that she insists on using it for every bite. She is a big dinner eater. She will eat pretty much anything, I love it!

Another issue for us is that DS will (I think) eat as little as possible to ease the hunger pangs, then go back to the much more exciting playing that the meal so inconveniently interrupted. Then he is starving in the middle of our next activity. At breakfast, morning snack, and lunch I am gently reminding him that last time he got very hungry and cranky when we did a past activity and encourage him (not force or insist) to eat a little more so that he will last a little longer.

I tell him I want his tummy to feel good and for him to feel happy instead of cranky. I bring food and water with us wherever we go, even if it is just some whole wheat pretzels.

Sorry this is so long, but another thing I wanted to mention that I try to put out food without making any verbal comment about it, not "What would you like?" or even, "Here you go." For some reason, the less I say out loud about the food I am offering, the more he eats.

-dflanag2
dflanag2 is offline  
#100 of 109 Old 02-05-2008, 11:19 PM
 
tulips117's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 204
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
What a great thread! Just chiming in here, that I make one meal for dinner each night. It is always a healthy meal, usually consisting of a starch, protein or meat, and vegetable. We typically have salad and bread at the table. These are the only options for dinner. If DS 4 doesn't like it, I always reply, "Well this is our food, and we are lucky to have it." If he doesn't eat, he is expected to sit at the table until the rest of us finish.

Now, he is STILL a born vegetarian even though DH, me, and his 2 yo brother all eat meat. It's fine with me if he leaves it on his plate. But I will not make another meal for anyone; and he has come to see that he better eat or he will be quite hungry later.

I know it's a hard line, but I feel strongly about not being a short order cook; nor do I want him to be ungrateful for the healthy food that his daddy worked very hard for to provide for us.
tulips117 is offline  
#101 of 109 Old 02-06-2008, 12:30 AM
 
NaomiMcC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 609
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilgreen View Post
What do you do when your child just does not like dinner?
I give him the option to either eat it or not. But if not, there's only water until bedtime and then he can wait until breakfast.

I'm not a restaurant. I do not make different meals for everybody. Don't like it, don't eat it. Simple as that. No child has ever starved skipping dinner.

I cannot stand picky eaters.:
NaomiMcC is offline  
#102 of 109 Old 02-06-2008, 01:36 AM
 
LilyGrace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 2,284
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Just to throw my $.02 in here...

I was a picky eater as a child. Very picky. I remember eating mayonaise sandwiches at one point and covering my already sweetened cereal with scoops of sugar. My mom's rule was if you don't like it, you don't have to eat it, which I don't think is exactly what I needed.

So, in our house, there's the one bite rule. You don't have to eat everything on your plate - unless you want seconds. What you do have to do is taste it all. We talk a lot about healthy eating and foods we used to not like but now do because of tasting one bite at each meal. When the boys were smaller, I used tv tray-style dishes to illustrate what we needed to eat - starches, meat, and sweet in the top sections, veggies/fruit in the large bottom section. If a child wanted seconds of anything, all the food needed to be eaten (and was usually served in 1/2 sized portions).
We cook together, we shop together, we garden together, we decide on meals together. So far it seems to be working well. My kids have MUCH better eating habits than I ever had (or do!), with favorite foods ranging from sushi to oatmeal with strawberries. They have a better grasp of nutrition and how it's fuel, with a better understanding of how each food helps them than I did as a kid.

I won't say this way works for everyone, but it took much of the edge off mealtime for us and helped them to develop their own tastes.
LilyGrace is offline  
#103 of 109 Old 02-06-2008, 02:48 AM
 
peaceful_mama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: #12 Grimmauld Place
Posts: 4,946
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
lately I'm into 'leftover meals' to combat this.

what I do is make something and then also dig through the fridge and heat up a couple other options.

so our meal for the evening might be roasted chicken, a big salad, and rice, and also on the table will be a small plate or two of random leftovers I found in the fridge, like some leftover lasagna, yesterdays sweet potatoes, whatever.

out of that I find my kids typically end up eating some sort of protein, some sort of grain, and some sort of something from the fruits and veggies group.

(they're not terribly picky my 3 year old is just WAY INTO choice and my one year old likes variety. this gives her something different at the next meal without me having to COOK it.)

we usually do a bedtime snack too with fruit and maybe PB and J or something if DS really didn't eat. (PBJ always wins LOL) around a couple hours after dinner

but at dinner you choose from what's on the table or well, you are obviously not very hungry so you wait.

lovin DH since 1/04, best mom for my 3 boys 10/04, 11/08, 11/10 one girlie (1/07), and one 13 wk (10/13) just your average :ha ng multigenerational living family!!
peaceful_mama is offline  
#104 of 109 Old 02-06-2008, 10:22 AM
 
mommy_e's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 228
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by NaomiMcC View Post
No child has ever starved skipping dinner.
No, but they can be very uncomfortable, in physical pain, and in the case of my second child, physically ill (vomiting) from it.

I just can't reconcile this with GD no matter how tired I am of fixing food that goes uneaten. I am still searching for a happy medium.
mommy_e is offline  
#105 of 109 Old 02-06-2008, 10:23 AM
 
GuildJenn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Toronto
Posts: 4,776
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I realize everyone's family does what works for them. But I wanted to pick up on a couple of reason posts.

One is the concept that gratitude is learned by limiting choice. I just wanted to say that my experience is different. When I was growing up my mother used food many, many times to "teach a lesson in gratitude" to the family. One time my father had wasted some money so we ate plain white rice for two weeks for every meal. Another time my sister said something rude about a meal and my mother fed her that meal for days.

What I learned in my teens and early 20s was first of all, that my thoughts, feelings, and experiences were not important at the family dinner table. I started to use my babysitting money to buy McDonalds after school every day (imagine what my arteries look like now) and I just tuned out at the table completely. When I got freedom to eat what I wanted, at university, I gained 30 lbs. For me, food = mother's control, and so later when food = freedom I exercised poor choices.

I realize that is an extreme example, but just think about what really creates gratitude. I think when people say "I learned to appreciate what we had" they are usually talking about a REALITY that their family had. When it is an artificially created lesson (no, you may not have anything else, even though the fridge is full and you can see that it is) I am not sure gratitude is what comes to mind.

Second, lots of people have talked about picky eaters - hating them, not creating them, etc. I wonder if you have read the research on this. While I do think there are some people who won't try things out of habit, scientific research does show that some people are "supertasters" or naturally picky. They taste and sense texture in a different way than the rest of us. After reading that and looking around my family, I honestly think that the vast majority of "pickiness" is either:

a) an inborn trait that you can fight all you like, but it will remain or
b) a developmental stage

Remember that between the ages of 2-5 in "the wild" children would be exposed to a lot of hazardous plants and so on. Their pickiness at an age when they are more mobile and capable is actually probably designed to protect them from eating poisonous things. Also, for most people in the world (and in history), foods were much more limited to what was available locally. Having so many different tastes may not be totally natural to a growing child, and enjoying the same food day after day (while adults tend to eat less, if their choices are limited) may also be a survival trait.

I am not saying anyone needs to be a short-order cook (I am not, although I'm willing to offer quick alternatives). I'm just saying that framing this as a MORAL issue with young children may be setting up conflicts that time itself would handle.

~ Mum to Emily, March 12-16 2004, Noah, born Aug 2005, Liam, born January 2011, and wife to Carl since 1994. ~
GuildJenn is offline  
#106 of 109 Old 02-06-2008, 10:33 AM
 
cancat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 564
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I just have two say that in North America there is an epidemic of obesity and eating disorders...given that, there's no way I'm making anyone eat anything they don't want to (but OTOH I'm not giving them dessert for dinner either).
cancat is offline  
#107 of 109 Old 02-06-2008, 12:28 PM
 
shantimama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 10,976
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
I only make one meal each night becasue that is what my time and energy allow - but I make sure the meal has something appealing to everyone. For years I made chicken nuggets on the nights I also made chicken curry. They both came to the table at the same time and were considered part of "the meal" - the nuggets were not made after my kids saw the curry and decided they didn't want it. One by one they all tried the curry and now it is a favourite meal at our house. It gave them a chance to get used to the smell and seeing it aorund while not having to try it right away.

When the table gets set, unless I know it is a meal everyone loves, I make a point of putting a bowl of apples, a dish of nuts and a loaf of bread on the table.

Different familes place different values on the evening meal. Some don't see it as a big deal - get what you want when you want and that works for them. Other familes have different needs or realities. The evening meal is an important part of the day in our family and sharing a common (or community) meal is a value for us. I respect that not everyone agrees with that. I prepare nutritious and tasty options but don't have the time or money to make everyone happy with the choices all of the time.

I feel like there is a significant difference between putting the bread, nuts, cheese or fruit on the table before the meal begins and making it a part of the meal for those who choose it, and people getting up after the meal has started and preparing something else, no matter how simple.
shantimama is online now  
#108 of 109 Old 02-06-2008, 12:56 PM
 
DevaMajka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Burnaby, BC
Posts: 10,519
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by chfriend View Post
I can't find it....do ya have the link, perchance?
http://www.mothering.com/discussions...ighlight=fruit
Post #2.

I know that the point is to be sugar free, but I find that they are a bit more tender if I add 1-2 tbsp of sugar (to the whole batch).
We LOVE them here (but then...I add chocolate chips, because I hate raisins. um, so how healthy are they with my changes? lol)

Becky, partner to Teague, SAHM to Keagan (7yo), Jonah (2yo)
 

DevaMajka is offline  
#109 of 109 Old 02-06-2008, 08:07 PM
 
madskye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 2,219
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I posted before that I make the meal, include things DD likes, and she can have cereal or crackers and cheese if she wants that instead. However, I just had an interesting conversation with a friend, that she is getting into to confrontations with her son, who will only eat peanut butter sandwiches. 3 meals a day. He is five and this has gone on for two years now, and she is really worried about his health and growth. He is a very stubborn kid, and he really will not eat anything other than peanut butter sandwiches and the occasional apple. She went with the flow for a while, figuring it was a phase, but it has really been two years now and she's worried. He is totally inflexible, and would honestly rather just not eat than eat anything else.

So, I think the issue is more than food--he's stubborn (for lack of a better word) about many things. But how do you handle that? She would rather he eat pb sandwiches than starve. But she really needs to get him to eat something else. How do you keep it from turning into a power struggle and how do you get a kid with an inflexible personality to bend a little?
madskye is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off