Low supply - What helped you? - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#31 of 107 Old 11-12-2013, 09:19 AM
 
cynthiamoon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 1,564
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggieLC View Post


I think it depends on the woman and how much research she has done. I've worked with 3 women with complete glandular insufficiency in my career and none of them realized it, themselves. Just heartbreaking, as none of their doctors recognized it either. I know I've seen and palpated thousands of breasts and had to check myself every time I had to dx glandular insufficiency, as it is so rare and so unusual. (And probably because I don't want it to be true!)  IMO, true hypoplastic breast is on a continuum, and as many women with breast hypoplasticity have had implants, and even nipple reconstruction, recognition may not always be as easy for some as it may be for a professional who has seen thousands of breasts. (Especially if the client doesn't tell you they've had breast reconstruction. Even when you ask. Some of the newer work is SO good that it's hard to tell unless you really get in there look and feel around, and ask the right questions in a gentle manner. FTR, I've worked with women with glandular insufficiency and hypoplasticity AND also women who have had reconstruction. I've never had a client with both but I'm always on the look out, especially when a client seems reluctant to tell her LC about implants. It isn't common, but is does happen.)

I'm betting you did a lot of research, also you live in the age of the internet. I'm glad you were able to find the answer yourself. Two of the three glandular insufficiency cases I've dealt with were in the late 90s, early 2000s, where the internet was not what it is today, and these mothers had never even heard of the condition. It's heartbreaking to tell a new mother who really wanted to nourish her baby with nothing but her own milk, "You don't have enough milk ducts to ever make enough milk for your baby alone." Luckily with the SNS or LactAid, these Mamas (like yourself) can still breastfeed while still supplementing their small supplies.

Of course with more fertility treatments being more and more effective, many women who simply would never have become pregnant even 20 years ago are having babies with assistance and we are seeing a slight increase in this condition in women attempting to lactate. That being said it's still rare enough that even a lot of OBs don't know what to look for. Sad, I know.

You are right... I only found it easy because I have a noticeable case and then researched the hell out of it online.

I am just annoyed no healthcare practitioner ever diagnosed it before, and that I had to be my own support until meeting an LC.

@Actiasluna I nurse for as long as she wants without the supplementer before adding it in. Times of day I produce more, this might be 5-10 minutes followed by 5-10 mins supplemented. But no additional nursing, no.

Writing about life-long learning and discovery at: www.neoapprentice.com 

:: A neo-apprentice knows there are no true masters. 

 

25yo FTM to a Wiggle Panda diaper.gif, student teacher read.gif, newlywed love.gif 

cynthiamoon is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#32 of 107 Old 11-12-2013, 11:11 AM
 
Actiasluna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 228
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
MaggieLC, I have no idea what my condition is caused by. None of my doctors have been helpful and all they can tell me is they don't know why. All the LC's I've talked to and my doctors seem to think the reason I have low supply is because I had such a traumatic birth and I, myself, beleive is has to do with poor advice from the midwife when I was frantic after my birth, so I followed it. (Putting him on a feeding schedule at 2 weeks of age). I am now trying to reverse this mistake. As for weighing, I live In a remote area and can't get to the LC more than once a week. Weighing him constantly was also leading to stress, affecting my supply, so I try to weigh him once a week. Since I have started to just nurse him constantly, I seem to be full enough to just nurse first thing in the morning (+ or _ .5-1oz) and snacks all the way through the day. I started this nursing constantly 4 days ago and I'm going to weigh him to today to see what's going on. The thing is, is that when I'm sure he hasn't had enough to eat, he stops eating, like, won't take more formula after 1 oz or 1.5oz. So that leads me to beleive he is full, right?! Because I have so little confidence in my supply, I am constantly trying to get more formula into him but he just deals his mouth after a nursing..so I guess he is full..

Anyways, it does frustrate me that none of my doctors actually make any effort to find out what my issue is, regardless of my insisting. I was a real mess for a few months after the birth and I accept it was likely trauma and bad advice from the midwife. I also think the LC's have been the most supportive, kindest, most knowledgable and most flexible, trying to get me to beleive on myself. I am going to talk to my doctor again about glandular insufficiency.
Actiasluna is offline  
#33 of 107 Old 11-12-2013, 11:47 AM
 
LorienIslay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 53
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Lots of stuff going on!  The only herbal remedy I've heard of helping a great deal for IGT is goat's rue.  It may actually help build breast tissue.  Also, IGT mums who experience low supply first babe often see increased supply with subsequent babes. 

For low supply, the most important thing and often most easiest is to take a nursing holiday: take babe to bed for 48 hours. Stock up on magazines, charged phone etc. and just do lots and lots of skin to skin, let baby drink as often as they want, relax and enjoy each other.  Frequent milk removal is the single most important thing for increase of supply. 

While it is true that prolactin levels slowly go down post partum until about the three month mark when they are stable, that doesn't mean there will be a drop in supply.  The levels are so high post partum to let the body lay down the cells that produce milk, and at three months, the body has decided they are set so levels normalize.  DO NOT DESPAIR, just because no or not many *new* cells are being made, doesn't mean that you can't make the most of, and even expand the production of, the cells you do have.  Again, the best way to do this is very frequent milk removal. 

bayosgirl87 likes this.
LorienIslay is offline  
#34 of 107 Old 11-12-2013, 08:35 PM
 
cynthiamoon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 1,564
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
The thing is that for true glandular insifficiency, which is not common, but happens, more milk removal doesn't help supply increase. The "milk factory" is just too small. For example, when I am engorged, full and leaking even, my daughter takes in just 1.5 ounces still. And that's peak production which takes 4 hrs to regenerate (at night). During day nursing every 2 hrs she gets more like .5 oz a meal.

Things like a nursing holiday for 48 hrs constant nursing just stresses women out and on the other side of it is just still not enough milk. As long as you are nursing enough, there's no need to go overboard. But if it's another cause , then yes, that might help. Lucky is the lady who can just take a break from the world like that though!

Writing about life-long learning and discovery at: www.neoapprentice.com 

:: A neo-apprentice knows there are no true masters. 

 

25yo FTM to a Wiggle Panda diaper.gif, student teacher read.gif, newlywed love.gif 

cynthiamoon is offline  
#35 of 107 Old 11-13-2013, 07:23 AM
 
MaggieLC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 410
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cynthiamoon View Post




You are right... I only found it easy because I have a noticeable case and then researched the hell out of it online.

I am just annoyed no healthcare practitioner ever diagnosed it before, and that I had to be my own support until meeting an LC.

@Actiasluna I nurse for as long as she wants without the supplementer before adding it in. Times of day I produce more, this might be 5-10 minutes followed by 5-10 mins supplemented. But no additional nursing, no.


I'm so sorry this happened. It should have been dxed in adolescence. I'm glad you were able to do your own dx and take care of your situation before you saw the LC. Keep up the good work. :) 


Attachment Parenting: The radical notion that children are human. bfinfant.gif
MaggieLC is offline  
#36 of 107 Old 11-13-2013, 07:51 AM
 
MaggieLC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 410
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Actiasluna View Post

MaggieLC, I have no idea what my condition is caused by. None of my doctors have been helpful and all they can tell me is they don't know why. All the LC's I've talked to and my doctors seem to think the reason I have low supply is because I had such a traumatic birth and I, myself, beleive is has to do with poor advice from the midwife when I was frantic after my birth, so I followed it. (Putting him on a feeding schedule at 2 weeks of age). I am now trying to reverse this mistake. As for weighing, I live In a remote area and can't get to the LC more than once a week. Weighing him constantly was also leading to stress, affecting my supply, so I try to weigh him once a week. Since I have started to just nurse him constantly, I seem to be full enough to just nurse first thing in the morning (+ or _ .5-1oz) and snacks all the way through the day. I started this nursing constantly 4 days ago and I'm going to weigh him to today to see what's going on. The thing is, is that when I'm sure he hasn't had enough to eat, he stops eating, like, won't take more formula after 1 oz or 1.5oz. So that leads me to beleive he is full, right?! Because I have so little confidence in my supply, I am constantly trying to get more formula into him but he just deals his mouth after a nursing..so I guess he is full..

Anyways, it does frustrate me that none of my doctors actually make any effort to find out what my issue is, regardless of my insisting. I was a real mess for a few months after the birth and I accept it was likely trauma and bad advice from the midwife. I also think the LC's have been the most supportive, kindest, most knowledgable and most flexible, trying to get me to beleive on myself. I am going to talk to my doctor again about glandular insufficiency.


You've been through a difficult time! Did you lose a lot of blood during the birth? There's a rare condition called Sheehan's Syndrome when the mother loses so much blood that it damages her pituitary gland and causes low milk supply. I've seen women recover from this, but they do respond to very frequent nursing, while women with Glandular Insufficiency do not.  If your supply is getting better with more nursing, it could possibly NOT be G.I.  G.I. limits the number of ducts and the ducts the woman has don't seem to respond as average ducts do to stimulation in most cases.  Goat's Rue or any other herb has no evidence based data supporting that it will do much of anything for women with True Glandular Insufficiency.  There is anecdotal data that Goat's Rue helps some but not all women with other reasons for low supply, I prefer Domperidone or in a pinch, Fenugreek.

 

Sadly, too many people who aren't trained seem to think that any low supply is due to G.I. when G.I is actually quite rare. Most cases of low supply are due to management in the early weeks (which will respond to treatment like "nursing vacations" while true G.I will not) and something like a quarter of women with PCOS with insulin resistance, which will often respond to drug therapy with Metformin. (And as a professional, I have to go with Evidence Based Data.)

 

Without seeing you, I can't diagnose you, of course. I'm kinda of wondering if it isn't G.I. as your LC would have noticed almost immediately. For the trained LC G.I, is fairly easy to spot, if mom hasn't had implants and reconstructive nipple surgery. If your OB didn't SEE if you had G.I. before the birth. I wouldn't trust him to diagnose it now. Some doctors will just go, 'Oh, yeah, that must be it." to avoid argument, when they have NO IDEA what they are looking at. As I said before, of the three G.I. clients I've had a a few less intense clients with hypoplastic breasts, NONE of their doctors., OB or otherwise noticed a thing! 

 

Is your baby gaining weight? If he's doing well, then weekly weighing is OK. My only concern is when the baby is losing weight or the weight is bouncing around, that I want to weigh  daily until the baby is on a good gaining trajectory. "Stress" really shouldn't much effect milk production at all (There are too many old wives tales about women "losing their milk" due to a shock or stress, but clinical work and research just doesn't bear this out.) . Pain, severe pain,  can cause problems with Ejection in some women, but it should not effect production. If you son is acting like he's full and he's gaining weight, I'd trust his instinct that he's done nursing and full for the moment.

 

If your baby is gaining and your supply seems to be improving, and you are only using an oz of supp every 4 hours or so, I'm guessing it's something other than G.I, (because he couldn't be gaining on nothing but 8 ounces of supp a day)  but your LC would know, as she's seen you and examined you in detail. It IS hard to gain confidence in yourself after a traumatic birth and lactation situation. I'd trust your LC to do right by you, even if she can't see you more than once a week, you can talk to her on the phone if it's something you need to talk to her about. Again, I'm going to stress, my instinct is saying there's a really good chance that this is NOT Glandular Insufficiency. (I can't say for sure, because I haven't seen you.)  But, I'm guessing a good LC would have caught that right in the beginning. I honestly wouldn't pursue that further with an MD, as not only is there nothing they can do about it, but I think if they "guess" and say you have it (while you probably don't) you'll only have MORE stress to deal with. Just the fact that you feel you have more milk from your Nursing Vacation and your LC has said nothing about G.I. leads me to believe it is something else. Most likely poor early management and perhaps something else. Just keep contact with your LC and keep doing what you are doing. :Hug

 

Good luck.


Attachment Parenting: The radical notion that children are human. bfinfant.gif
MaggieLC is offline  
#37 of 107 Old 11-13-2013, 12:53 PM
 
drswolfson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Wow...everything you are doing would contribute to low milk supply.  Do not pump unless absolutely necessary.  The pump will decrease your supply but the baby suckling for anything and everything will increase it.  Never use a pacifier...put baby to breast as much as possible.  Nurse a lot during the night.  Nurse on demand day and night and use breast for pacifying.  Alcohol is the worst thing to give your newborn baby through your milk.  Giving donor milk is taking the place of your baby nursing on your breast losing the opportunity to make more milk for yourself.  More nursing equals more milk supply.  Alfalfa is one of the highest GMO foods on the planet.  Make sure it's organic.  Taking any tincture, essential oil or herbal remedy will change the taste/composition of your milk.  Most babies will not want to nurse because of this.  Eat Paleo foods...what a human being is supposed to eat.  Lots of good fats like avocado, coconut, soaked nuts and seeds, grass-fed meats, wild salmon, sardines/anchovies, organic vegetables and salads etc.  Drink nothing but purified water and LOTS of it.  Most women who don't make enough milk are dehydrated.  Do not consume any caffeine (chocolate, carob, tea, decaf coffee, reg. coffee etc.), alcohol, gluten, soy, dairy or sugar.

2babies2kidsmom likes this.
drswolfson is offline  
#38 of 107 Old 11-13-2013, 01:00 PM
 
Sabijo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 15
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I haven't read the other responses or checked to see how long its been since your post, but here goes:

 

1.) REST! I feel like the lack of rest is quickly dwindling my own supply, so try and rest as much as you can!

 

2.) HUMMUS! I almost immediately feel a change in my milk supply. ( A big container of organic hummus can be found at Costco, check out the Hannah brand.)

 

3.) Carrot juice--I like the organic pack of 3 sold at Costco for a great price.

 

4.) 8+ glasses of water a day, obvs.

 

5.) A friend with low supply found that her thyroid had been damaged during pregnancy, and she just was not able to make more milk....

 

6.) Side Note: I used sage when I was weaning my toddler...is that totally different from the stuff you're taking?? If not, it will dry up your milk! It helped stop producing milk within 3 days (I was eating it all day long).

 

7.) Mother's Milk Tea--the one with fennel seeds (the tea is expensive, I'm sure you could get the same result with adding some raw fennel seeds to a mug of hot water).

 

Power to ya, good luck with nurishing your little one!

Sabijo is offline  
#39 of 107 Old 11-13-2013, 01:15 PM
 
cynthiamoon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 1,564
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)

@lilmamita, how's it going? 


Writing about life-long learning and discovery at: www.neoapprentice.com 

:: A neo-apprentice knows there are no true masters. 

 

25yo FTM to a Wiggle Panda diaper.gif, student teacher read.gif, newlywed love.gif 

cynthiamoon is offline  
#40 of 107 Old 11-13-2013, 01:47 PM
 
Backroads's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Washington Terrace, Utah
Posts: 235
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)

Fenugreek worked for me.


--Breastfeeding----2nd grade Teaching----Cosleeping----Cloth Diapering -- --Bookworm Mom
Backroads is offline  
#41 of 107 Old 11-14-2013, 06:49 AM
 
MaggieLC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 410
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by drswolfson View Post
 

Wow...everything you are doing would contribute to low milk supply.  Do not pump unless absolutely necessary.  The pump will decrease your supply but the baby suckling for anything and everything will increase it.  Never use a pacifier...put baby to breast as much as possible.  Nurse a lot during the night.  Nurse on demand day and night and use breast for pacifying.  Alcohol is the worst thing to give your newborn baby through your milk.  Giving donor milk is taking the place of your baby nursing on your breast losing the opportunity to make more milk for yourself.  More nursing equals more milk supply.  Alfalfa is one of the highest GMO foods on the planet.  Make sure it's organic.  Taking any tincture, essential oil or herbal remedy will change the taste/composition of your milk.  Most babies will not want to nurse because of this.  Eat Paleo foods...what a human being is supposed to eat.  Lots of good fats like avocado, coconut, soaked nuts and seeds, grass-fed meats, wild salmon, sardines/anchovies, organic vegetables and salads etc.  Drink nothing but purified water and LOTS of it.  Most women who don't make enough milk are dehydrated.  Do not consume any caffeine (chocolate, carob, tea, decaf coffee, reg. coffee etc.), alcohol, gluten, soy, dairy or sugar.


If you have evidence based data on the Paleo Diet causing an increase in milk supply, I'd love to see it I subscribe to Lactation Journals and have seen little to no respected peer reviewed data that any special diet has much of an impact on supply. I'd like to read it. I don't put a lot of merit in "testimonials" my profession requires actual evidence based data.

 

I've been a clinician working as an IBCLC for more than 20 years and from where I sit, two of the best ways to lose your audience or have a client dismiss your claims are to start by telling the client that l "everything you are doing is wrong" and then try to make them drastically  change their lifestyle. That way even if what one are saying has any merit, your audience has already turned off. Tell people that everything they do and everything they eat is wrong (especially without proof) is just going to cause your audience to reject any further advice. I've worked with thousands of women on average American diets and most have wonderfully full supplies.

 

I do have to say that most problems with lactation are either 1) physiological issues in mother or baby  or 2) lactation management related. Very little is diet related.

 

As for the pumping, when a woman has a low supply, pumping in addition to nursing the baby as much as possible is Lactation 101. Stimulation prompts supply. Of course, the baby is the BEST "pump" available, but when women have a seriously low supply, and IS nursing all the baby can, some pumping is usually helpful.  Not to mention women whose babies are in the NICU and not yet on the breast, the ONLY way to bring in and keep a supply is to pump, the same for women who need to work outside the home away from their babies. All these women KEEP their supplies and often increase them from pumping. Again, if you have evidenced based  peer reviewed data that "pumping will decrease your supply." I'd love to see it.

 

I also wanted to say that although no one wants to see lactating women intoxicated, alcohol is far from "the worst thing" that can go through one's milk. Moderate to light alcohol consumption is usually completely compatible with lactation. There actually have been evidence based data sources that link certain types of (mostly European)  beers to boosted supplies. (And the "Paleolithic Era" ended approx 10,000 years ago, beer was made from fermenting grain into alcohol at least 10,000 years ago. So, if.... cave people drank beer..... :mischief)

 

I, myself, don't consume alcohol, nor do I consume dairy products, but as a practitioner, ethically and practically, my job isn't to get all my clients to live my personal lifestyle my job is to give them the tools we know through research and practice will work to help women breastfeed their babies. I'm a Lactation Consultant, not a Lifestyle Consultant. Clients know what they hire me for. They hear enough horror stories from their friends who didn't succeed at breastfeeding. My job is to make breastfeeding as simple as possible for my clients, not clog their lives with thousands of "don'ts.."

 

Making breastfeeding sound too difficult and trying to drastically change clients' lifestyles or make clients think they are stupid and doing everything wrong simply turns clients away and then they can't be helped at all.

 

I just felt I had to say something.


Attachment Parenting: The radical notion that children are human. bfinfant.gif
MaggieLC is offline  
#42 of 107 Old 11-14-2013, 11:42 AM
 
cynthiamoon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 1,564
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggieLC View Post
 

Making breastfeeding sound too difficult and trying to drastically change clients' lifestyles or make clients think they are stupid and doing everything wrong simply turns clients away and then they can't be helped at all.

 

I just felt I had to say something.

 

Thanks for saying something. I was thinking the same. 

rainydaycraft and MaggieLC like this.

Writing about life-long learning and discovery at: www.neoapprentice.com 

:: A neo-apprentice knows there are no true masters. 

 

25yo FTM to a Wiggle Panda diaper.gif, student teacher read.gif, newlywed love.gif 

cynthiamoon is offline  
#43 of 107 Old 11-14-2013, 04:45 PM
 
Actiasluna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 228
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yes, thanks for saying that!
rainydaycraft and MaggieLC like this.
Actiasluna is offline  
#44 of 107 Old 11-14-2013, 11:58 PM
 
EineMutti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 185
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by drswolfson View Post
 

Wow...everything you are doing would contribute to low milk supply.  Do not pump unless absolutely necessary.  The pump will decrease your supply but the baby suckling for anything and everything will increase it.  Never use a pacifier...put baby to breast as much as possible.  Nurse a lot during the night.  Nurse on demand day and night and use breast for pacifying.  Alcohol is the worst thing to give your newborn baby through your milk.  Giving donor milk is taking the place of your baby nursing on your breast losing the opportunity to make more milk for yourself.  More nursing equals more milk supply.  Alfalfa is one of the highest GMO foods on the planet.  Make sure it's organic.  Taking any tincture, essential oil or herbal remedy will change the taste/composition of your milk.  Most babies will not want to nurse because of this.  Eat Paleo foods...what a human being is supposed to eat.  Lots of good fats like avocado, coconut, soaked nuts and seeds, grass-fed meats, wild salmon, sardines/anchovies, organic vegetables and salads etc.  Drink nothing but purified water and LOTS of it.  Most women who don't make enough milk are dehydrated.  Do not consume any caffeine (chocolate, carob, tea, decaf coffee, reg. coffee etc.), alcohol, gluten, soy, dairy or sugar.

 

It doesn't have to be that difficult! Some mums and babies react to dairy, but most do not. And while Paleo is a great approach, a strict Paleo is not for everyone as it makes you lose weight and some of us cannot afford to, especially during breastfeeding. 

 

And some women see chocolate as a basic human right ;)

EineMutti is offline  
#45 of 107 Old 11-15-2013, 06:28 AM
 
electricalaskan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: 49th state
Posts: 147
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm so glad to see this thread. I gave birth via emergency (and very much unplanned)
C-section eight days ago, and I am only getting Milliliters =( I'm on the herbal mixture. I'm told I may not have enough mammary tissue, also. I want so badly to get moving and going!
electricalaskan is offline  
#46 of 107 Old 11-15-2013, 03:03 PM
 
Actiasluna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 228
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I also had an emergency c section after 72hrs of labour. Apparently it's quite common to have low supply after such trauma.
Actiasluna is offline  
#47 of 107 Old 11-16-2013, 01:28 PM
 
electricalaskan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: 49th state
Posts: 147
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Is it naturally reversible? I'm so glad Domperidone is an option; I'm definitely hoping to exhaust other routes. I've drank beer (not too much!), eaten oatmeal, drank orange juice, made cookies with brewers yeast... Any trick I can find!
electricalaskan is offline  
#48 of 107 Old 11-16-2013, 02:06 PM
 
PeaceBeWithYou's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

1. put your baby on the breast for nursing as often as you humanly can, this alone will increase your milk production within few days. You might have problems to stop :) the nature has embedded system.. more frequent feedings, more milk needed, we need to kick up the supply.

2. there are much safer things out there then drugs that always have some known and unknown effects.

Dried Organic Alfalfa from Whole foods Store. (don't buy non organic herbs as they have bed stuff in them )

Fenugreek

 

I always took only one pill a day when I wanted to kick up the supply and it worked like a charm. don't take it when you don't need it as the production will go up and you will have opposite problems.

3. Keep your body warm, keep your brests and torso very warm all day beause the cooler you are the less inclined you will be to produce milk. Body works that way.

 

4. be careful not to eat much cabbage or remove it from your diet until your milk wilk kick in.

Cabage reduces the milk production. raw, cooked, in any form, don't.

 

5. Do not drink cold drinks and especially drinks with ice.  For some reason this also effects the process. Drink room temperature or warm liquids only. At least until you will get everything going.

 

6. Drinking cup of  warm milk also helps.

 

7. Learn, ask forum about their experiences with food while nursing. This is not common sense thing. You need to know for fact which foods will help you to increase milk production and which will decrease it as most normal regular foods that we eat affect milk production as is in the cabbage case. Reason behind is that many kind of foods  either contain hormone like ingredients or affect hormons in other way. So as is in the cabbage case it actually affects milk producing hormone and so you have adverse effect to desired here.

Alfalfa - increases mlk production. Water in plastic bottle and anything heated in plastic might affect by decreasing as plastic leaches into your food and drinks and affects your hormons IMMENSLy. Regardless of the fact that it is BPA free plastic.

 

Generaly keep yourself warm in general. The nature of breastfeeding is connected with natural processes and body follows the notion -

not enough food - we are not going to be able to make milk we have to keep storing...

not enough drink - the same idea

too cold body - we have to focus on maintaining the body temperature and milk production has to wait

... nature is smart and takes first the body life support processes and only secondary functions are supported then.

In other words keep yourself well fed, rested, well drinking water and warm liquids, keep your body warm and eat right food and

that will help a lot.

 

If you will end up having too much milk though cabage is a life saver - just smash or chop leaves into mush in the processor and put the paste on your breast cover with cotton rug and keep as long as you can stand it for two days and this removes engorgement, painful lumps and blocked milk ducts.

Awsome.

 

First heand experience - From mom who nursed for MANY years and been through it all.

PeaceBeWithYou is offline  
#49 of 107 Old 11-16-2013, 03:42 PM
 
samstress's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: so-cal
Posts: 2,236
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

notes.gif


mother is a verb
I GOT MY vbac.gif!!!

samstress is offline  
#50 of 107 Old 11-16-2013, 04:10 PM
 
Ponyomum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Australia
Posts: 25
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
motilium(has another d name) and changing my diet to include more lactogenic foods such as barley water, wholegrains, carrots, leafy greens, sesame seeds and spices.

Not sure how much the diet changed helped my supply as a started motilium at the same time but I felt more full and less moody. I got most of my information mobimotherhood.org
Ponyomum is offline  
#51 of 107 Old 11-16-2013, 06:35 PM
 
Ponyomum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Australia
Posts: 25
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Also meant to say started drinking a litre of iced tea(nettle and roobios) and feeding her in the sling while I'm doing chores(feeds are less rushed and she stays on the breast longer). Started yoga aswell to deal with stress and aches from carrying her so often and well being in general. Goddess pose and feet against the wall pose are good to just relax.
Ponyomum is offline  
#52 of 107 Old 11-16-2013, 09:08 PM
 
JNajla's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Posts: 620
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I had low supply and I'm taking Domperidone. It almost doubled my supply. I also take fenugreek and moringa.

First time mama to baby Easton born on 6/21/13!

JNajla is offline  
#53 of 107 Old 11-16-2013, 10:55 PM
 
Actiasluna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 228
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Fenugreek did not help me and I don't know if my milk has increased because I am over the worst part of the healing, or if its the domperidone or both. Nursing more definitely helps the most. In my opinion, i beleive a healthy diet is good for lactation but I am sceptical that certain foods increase or decrease it, although cabbage leaves directly on the breast have a true effect. But In saying that, I have tried everything, food wise, that is said to increase lactation, just in case. smile.gif
Actiasluna is offline  
#54 of 107 Old 11-17-2013, 12:27 AM
 
electricalaskan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: 49th state
Posts: 147
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thank you so much! I'll put my baby to the breast more often. She gets so angry at me to the point where I have to console her if I try to do it greensad.gif But we just got her a SwaddlePod that keeps her super happy... I will keep at it!
electricalaskan is offline  
#55 of 107 Old 11-17-2013, 11:51 AM
 
danamama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Leipzig, Germany
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Hi Lilmamita,

I was running into the same problem  with my preemie son. I took a bunch of fenugreek (2 capsules 3 times a day), I also imagined my milk flowing as I was nursing him. If I would worry about the flow it would make the supply less. Your milk is most plentiful between the hours of 1 and 4 am and adding an extra pumping session helped me... Also, upping protein did wonders for me.

Good luck! You can do it…my babe is now (9 months) right in the middle of the weight gain curve and started at 0.3 percentile as a tiny dude. 

danamama is offline  
#56 of 107 Old 11-18-2013, 10:53 AM
 
A Mother Hen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 31
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Just a couple reminders--- babies do lose "weight" in the days immediately after birth. THat is completely normal. IT is all water weight as they were water logged. Is your baby steadily gaining weight from the lowest BW? ANother factor is that milk supply will usually increase as demand is placed on the lactating system. Most moms have a peak of production that is built in-- you are likely to still be building up to this level. Another factor can be be we are often conscious of the extra baby weight that we want to shed asap, and unfortunately decreasing calories also shuts down milk production. Perhaps eating more foods, quality foods high in calcium, proteins, and such along with an increase in water consumption. I have forgottent he numbers specifically, but it takes about 5 times the water intake to make a 1/2 pint of milk.

OTher areas to consider: sufficient rest, and relaxation. For me, I did better in my own room separate from other demands. Easier with the first baby than the second. lol

Good luck!!
A Mother Hen is offline  
#57 of 107 Old 11-19-2013, 12:44 AM
 
Tigerle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Europe
Posts: 1,388
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by EineMutti View Post
 

I had a really nice tea I drank all day, called "Stilltee" (breastfeeding tea). Aniseed, caraway and fennel. Two litres of that a day. Frequent, wholesome food helps, too, but most important I found for afternoon and evening supply was a long nap midday. Don't know if you baby naps well yet or someone could take baby for a bit so you can sleep?

 

Sleep deprivation is terrible for supply.

Weleda nursing tea, avbailable on amazon http://www.amazon.com/Weleda-Nursing-Tea-Dietary-Supplement/dp/B005ZHWZYC/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1384849186&sr=8-2&keywords=weleda+tea

Also alcohol-free wheat beer or champaign. If you think it may be PCOS, cutting down on carbs and upping your protein and fat may help in the short run while you get prescriptions and stuff.

And rest rest rest. It's really crucial.

 

Edited to add that going paleo all the way is one way to regulate a metabolic disorder like PCOS but it is not the only one and the transition is certainly not conducive to getting the rest you need!


Mesleepytime.gifDH geek.gif DS1 10/06 drum.gif DD 08/10 notes.gifDS2 10/12babyf.gifwith SB ribbonyellow.gif and cat.gifcat.gif 
Tigerle is online now  
#58 of 107 Old 11-19-2013, 02:22 AM
 
EineMutti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 185
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)

I second the alcohol-free wheat beer and malt beer. And remember to nap ;)

EineMutti is offline  
#59 of 107 Old 11-20-2013, 02:07 PM
 
Actiasluna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 228
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Does anyone know WHY lack of sleep
Is so crucial? I have a really low supply, my baby rarely naps more then 20 min so I never nap ( and am really tired).
Actiasluna is offline  
#60 of 107 Old 11-21-2013, 05:59 AM
 
Sphinxy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 614
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Actiasluna View Post

Does anyone know WHY lack of sleep
Is so crucial? I have a really low supply, my baby rarely naps more then 20 min so I never nap ( and am really tired).

I'm sure there are a few reasons, but I've heard it's just like when you are fighting of a cold or something - it takes a lot of energy for your body to produce milk, and so it accomplishes that task best while you are sleeping. I know for me, my breasts always feel fuller after I wake up than they do for a feeding when I've not gotten rest in between.
Ponyomum likes this.

My wife (30) and I (32) have been legally married since 2006. We are proud queer mamas to baby W, born 10/10/2013.
Sphinxy is offline  
Reply

Tags
Breastfeeding , Breastfeeding Challenges , Challenges With Breastfeeding

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off