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#61 of 107 Old 11-21-2013, 06:44 AM
 
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i think every breastfeeding mom should have sufficient rest for your body to generate milk. do take nutritious food like fish, milk, soy, oat and plenty fruits and vegetable and water.


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#62 of 107 Old 11-21-2013, 07:25 AM
 
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Does anyone know WHY lack of sleep
Is so crucial? I have a really low supply, my baby rarely naps more then 20 min so I never nap ( and am really tired).


It depends on the woman. All new moms have a lack of sleep! All my kids were babies who didn't sleep much and I always had a ton of milk. But, if your milk supply is already precarious, it's best to be as healthy as possible and good health includes as much sleep as possible.


Nature KNOWS that new moms don't get a lot of sleep, so milk supply isn't dramatically dependent on a LOT of sleep. That wouldn't make sense. Nature knows you will get sleep in little bits, when you can. Many moms find napping when the baby naps is the easiest. Of course, co-sleeping has been proven to provide new moms with the best quality and best quantity sleep available!

 

Even if your baby isn't sleeping a lot, he has to sleep sometime. Don't use that time to catch up on laundry or housework. Lie down and rest. Also, lying down with the baby at the breast, even if he isn't going to sleep is going to help.


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#63 of 107 Old 11-21-2013, 09:02 AM
 
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I noticed a difference in baby's mood and behaviour when I had a nap in the day. He was just "fuller" and happier, more content when I had had a nap. My breasts felt fuller after a nap, too. Much like they did in the mornings. 

 

It's always easy to say take it easy with the housework, it's everyone's advice. But letting it go in this house means creating more work, as it builds up so quickly and my three boys just don't see it. I did the house work when DS was awake, deliberately timed that way. Would carry him around, talk to him, keep him awake and do housework. Nap time was nap time for me, too.

 

You could perhaps try and knacker your DS out quite a bit and then co-sleep for nap.time, feeding him while you still rest and then go back to sleep? 

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#64 of 107 Old 11-28-2013, 08:27 PM
 
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When I thought my supply was low or I wanted to boost it for any reason I would make a batch of oatmeal cookies and eat a few - it was crazy how well it worked

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#65 of 107 Old 12-02-2013, 12:25 PM
 
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I WISH it was as simple as eating oatmeal! For me, nothing worked except Domperidone, and even then, I'm producing 20 ounces a day. I had a reduction about 13 years ago, so that's why it's hard for me. Even fenugreek doesn't do much.

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#66 of 107 Old 12-06-2013, 01:58 AM
 
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It doesn't have to be that difficult! Some mums and babies react to dairy, but most do not. And while Paleo is a great approach, a strict Paleo is not for everyone as it makes you lose weight and some of us cannot afford to, especially during breastfeeding. 

 

And some women see chocolate as a basic human right ;)

Have you ever checked out more recent takes on the Paleo diet in the Ancestral health movement? Specifically, the Primal Blueprint http://www.marksdailyapple.com/why-you-should-eat-and-drink-high-cacao-dark-chocolate/

or the Perfect Health Diet?

http://perfecthealthdiet.com/2012/11/chocolate-what-is-the-optimal-dose/

Try it, you'll love it....

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#67 of 107 Old 12-06-2013, 02:03 AM
 
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And rest rest rest. It's really crucial.

 

Just thought I'd clarify that I do not mean, specifically, sleep - thinking "I should get more sleep than I am getting - is probably going to stress you out even more! It's just as much about making nursing enjoyable - your favourite place in the house, no one else around if that disturbs you or the baby (when they were little, nursing worked better when there was someone in the room to chat with as it relaxed me, later I had to retire to a darkened bedroom, alone). Read or watch TV - I love reading my kindle paperwhite, because it works in the dark too. Soem need to have a drink or snack, before, some after. And milk it (pun intended!) for what it's worth, to make sure extended family knows nursing is your time, you are not to be disturbed, you get to do what helps you, and nothing else matters as much.


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#68 of 107 Old 12-06-2013, 07:47 AM
 
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If you have evidence based data on the Paleo Diet causing an increase in milk supply, I'd love to see it I subscribe to Lactation Journals and have seen little to no respected peer reviewed data that any special diet has much of an impact on supply. I'd like to read it. I don't put a lot of merit in "testimonials" my profession requires actual evidence based data.

I've been a clinician working as an IBCLC for more than 20 years and from where I sit, two of the best ways to lose your audience or have a client dismiss your claims are to start by telling the client that l "everything you are doing is wrong" and then try to make them drastically  change their lifestyle. That way even if what one are saying has any merit, your audience has already turned off. Tell people that everything they do and everything they eat is wrong (especially without proof) is just going to cause your audience to reject any further advice. I've worked with thousands of women on average American diets and most have wonderfully full supplies.

I do have to say that most problems with lactation are either 1) physiological issues in mother or baby  or 2) lactation management related. Very little is diet related.

As for the pumping, when a woman has a low supply, pumping in addition to nursing the baby as much as possible is Lactation 101. Stimulation prompts supply. Of course, the baby is the BEST "pump" available, but when women have a seriously low supply, and IS nursing all the baby can, some pumping is usually helpful.  Not to mention women whose babies are in the NICU and not yet on the breast, the ONLY way to bring in and keep a supply is to pump, the same for women who need to work outside the home away from their babies. All these women KEEP their supplies and often increase them from pumping. Again, if you have evidenced based  peer reviewed data that "pumping will decrease your supply." I'd love to see it.


I also wanted to say that although no one wants to see lactating women intoxicated, alcohol is far from "the worst thing" that can go through one's milk. Moderate to light alcohol consumption is usually completely compatible with lactation. There actually have been evidence based data sources that link certain types of (mostly European)  beers to boosted supplies. (And the "Paleolithic Era" ended approx 10,000 years ago, beer was made from fermenting grain into alcohol at least 10,000 years ago. So, if.... cave people drank beer..... mischievous.gif )

I, myself, don't consume alcohol, nor do I consume dairy products, but as a practitioner, ethically and practically, my job isn't to get all my clients to live my personal lifestyle my job is to give them the tools we know through research and practice will work to help women breastfeed their babies. I'm a Lactation Consultant, not a Lifestyle Consultant. Clients know what they hire me for. They hear enough horror stories from their friends who didn't succeed at breastfeeding. My job is to make breastfeeding as simple as possible for my clients, not clog their lives with thousands of "don'ts.."

Making breastfeeding sound too difficult and trying to drastically change clients' lifestyles or make clients think they are stupid and doing everything wrong simply turns clients away and then they can't be helped at all.

I just felt I had to say something.


I have found when I eat paleo my babie want to nurse more because their tummies are calmer. Large quantities of chocolate, sugar and dairy make my twins fussier. They arch their backs and pull away and cry. They use their Pacifiers more when I eat stuff that bothers them. These are the third and fourth babies I've nursed, it's taken me this long to learn. Just because the research hasn't been done yet doesn't make it untrue. I wish more professionals (doctors, midwives, lactation consultants) would realize diet is a huge part of health and actually try to educate the public. It's not a judgment on someone's lifestyle to tell them to ease up on the chocolate so their baby will nurse better! It is so frustrating to me that people won't admit that what you eat while pregnant and nursing matters! Food is more than just a number of calories.
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#69 of 107 Old 12-06-2013, 08:43 AM
 
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I agree with @maggielc. Also, correlation does not equal causation. Just because your babies nurse more when you eat paleo does not mean that their tummies are calmer or that the paleo diet caused their nursing habits to change. Maybe they nurse more because you are happier and calmer on a paleo diet. Maybe they nurse more because your diet changed the properties of your milk and they need more food. You have no way of knowing why those two things happen simultaneously. There could be many other reasons, and it is dangerous to give advice based on one person's anecdote. And even if your guess about their tummies being calmer is right, there is no reason to think this would work for anyone else. I don't eat paleo and my supply is great, my kid nurses like a champ. I have chocolate daily. Should I go tell women not to eat paleo or to add a daily chocolate intake so that they can have my experience? No, because it might not work for them.
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#70 of 107 Old 12-06-2013, 03:32 PM
 
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I have found when I eat paleo my babie want to nurse more because their tummies are calmer. Large quantities of chocolate, sugar and dairy make my twins fussier. They arch their backs and pull away and cry. They use their Pacifiers more when I eat stuff that bothers them. These are the third and fourth babies I've nursed, it's taken me this long to learn. Just because the research hasn't been done yet doesn't make it untrue. I wish more professionals (doctors, midwives, lactation consultants) would realize diet is a huge part of health and actually try to educate the public. It's not a judgment on someone's lifestyle to tell them to ease up on the chocolate so their baby will nurse better! It is so frustrating to me that people won't admit that what you eat while pregnant and nursing matters! Food is more than just a number of calories.


Again, as an ethical practitioner, I have to follow what we know is evidence based data. If this diet works for you, that's great, but my quoting you as fact would not be ethical, as it is anecdotal. I also have vegetarian clients who claim their diets make their babies calmer and to consume more milk. Exactly opposite diets, same anecdotal reports. I have to use fact and science in my practice, otherwise all practitioners would all have been "on the bandwagon" with people claims to being "hypoglycemic"  (and eating that particular diet) in the mid 80s, everybody claiming to having "yeast candida poisoning"  (and eating that diet) in the late 80s and 90s, "parasites" in the early 2000s (that one didn't last long, people tend to move away from one when one tells others one has parasites) and the same for Paleo and gluten free diets of late and either vegetarian or vegan or even Macrobiotic diets since the late 60s . These diets might work for some people, and they MAY, but we simply don't have the peer reviewed data for people like me to try to change people's lifestyles based on the anecdotal reports a few people.

 

Please review this paragraph I wrote:
I, myself, don't consume alcohol, nor do I consume dairy products, but as a practitioner, ethically and practically, my job isn't to get all my clients to live my personal lifestyle my job is to give them the tools we know through research and practice will work to help women breastfeed their babies. I'm a Lactation Consultant, not a Lifestyle Consultant. Clients know what they hire me for. They hear enough horror stories from their friends who didn't succeed at breastfeeding. My job is to make breastfeeding as simple as possible for my clients, not clog their lives with thousands of "don'ts.."

 

My Scope of Practice also doesn't include radically changing people's eating habits, so I won't do it. Plus, make breastfeeding difficult and tied to all kinds of things that may be difficult or impossible for many (the Paleo diet as it is interpreted today (sans insects, carrion and other things true Paleolithic people actually needed to survive on) can easily be seen as one of Privilege, most low  and middle low income women  simply cannot afford the amounts of meats involved in this diet and they have to rely heavily on inexpensive carbohydrates for a good quantity of their caloric needs. And most of them have perfectly healthy milk supplies, as long as their breastfeeding management is good and there are no physiological problems with the babies or the mothers. Plus, it isn't MY business to assess their pantries and refrigerators. My job is to use the tools we know WORK to ensure healthy lactation.

 

Plus, we've seen that even famine doesn't drastically alter human milk composition or quantity! (This is FACT and has been proven.) Of course, women and babies tend to do somewhat better on a "healthy" diet, but what constitutes a "healthy" diet varies from person to person, from age to age and from community to community and often relies on access to expensive food that not all can afford. For me to tell my clients to "eat Paleo" when their WIC won't support that not only goes against my Scope of Practice, has no evidenced based science behind it, but makes MANY women feel they aren't eating "well enough to breastfeed" and they may wean their babies because they feel their diets are inferior.

 

This diet may work for you and that's great.  If it works and you are happy with it, stick with it. But, I cannot, in good conscience tell people to change their lives based on nothing but Testimonial. My practice requires evidence, and I don't see it for any of the eating fads that I have seen in the 20+ years I've been practicing. Nothing against any of these diets, just that there is no proof that they make any difference in milk supply or milk quality and the huge fact that there is simply NO evidence based, peer reviewed data to show ANY of them makes a bit of difference in quality or quantity of a mother's milk.

 

I'm not telling you not to eat this way, it's your choice, but I likewise can't tell other women to eat the way you do, based on nothing but anecdote.


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#71 of 107 Old 12-06-2013, 04:20 PM
 
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MaggieLC, do you know how long people usually go using the SNS? My son is 4.5months and we are still supplementing with the SNS because I was never able to work up my milk supply. He is currently getting between 8-15oz of formula daily. I don't know how much milk I make. Many people I talk to keep saying I should stop using the SNS because they think it is more stressful then bottle feeding but they don't seem to understand that that their experiences of EBF is very different than not having enough milk and supplementing and the only reason I have any milk at all is because I used the SNS. Also, many people seem to think that once my son start solids when he is 6 months old, I will be breastfeeding and supplementing much less. But this can't be true because solids don't make up very much of the diet for a 6m-1yr old, correct? And if I give up the SNS and switch to bottles, will my dreary milk supply become more non existent? Should I just give up breastfeeding all together and formula feed completely and accept the heartbreak of not being able to breastfeed?

Anyways, my main question is how long do people use the SNS for?
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#72 of 107 Old 12-07-2013, 07:09 AM
 
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MaggieLC, do you know how long people usually go using the SNS? My son is 4.5months and we are still supplementing with the SNS because I was never able to work up my milk supply. He is currently getting between 8-15oz of formula daily. I don't know how much milk I make. Many people I talk to keep saying I should stop using the SNS because they think it is more stressful then bottle feeding but they don't seem to understand that that their experiences of EBF is very different than not having enough milk and supplementing and the only reason I have any milk at all is because I used the SNS. Also, many people seem to think that once my son start solids when he is 6 months old, I will be breastfeeding and supplementing much less. But this can't be true because solids don't make up very much of the diet for a 6m-1yr old, correct? And if I give up the SNS and switch to bottles, will my dreary milk supply become more non existent? Should I just give up breastfeeding all together and formula feed completely and accept the heartbreak of not being able to breastfeed?

Anyways, my main question is how long do people use the SNS for?


Actiasluna, how long depends on the situation.

 

I've worked with women who have used an SNS device for only a few days and some who have used the device for the entirety of their breastfeeding experience.

 

I can't advise directly, but if you are experiencing a chronic low supply issue, it is perfectly fine to use the SNS for as long as you and the baby need it.

 

Moms often wean from the SNS when the baby is leaving nearly ALL the formula or donor milk in the SNS, then we know her supply has caught up and she can stop using the device, along with watching wet and stooling diapers and with some weigh ins.

 

As you are using between 8-15 oz of supplement a day, it is obvious your baby still needs that supplement and if the SNS is working well for both of you there is no reason to stop using the SNS.

 

I've never heard that "the SNS is more stressful than a bottle." We know that when the baby is at breast respiration, heart rate and even cortisol and other hormones are more regular and at more healthy levels than with bottle use, the SNS doesn't change that. From what we know, as long as the SNS is working for mom and baby, the device usage is usually LESS stressful than bottle use. I think maybe the idea that the SNS is "stressful" comes from people who are in their early days of trying it and are stressing about the device, getting used to the working of the device etc.

 

If you and your sweet baby are comfortable and the supplement is necessary (and it sounds like both of these are true) then I would tell a client in this situation to use the SNS for as long as she and the baby need it.

 

I've seen moms use the SNS for a year or more. After that, babies are often taking more solids and a chronic low milk supply is less of a problem, but I've seen moms with older toddlers (over the age of 1 or 18 months, not 6 months, your baby will still need the same amount of milk at 6 months, so I would keep using the SNS even after he starts solids for quite a while)  using them, often in adoption situations, lesbian partner nursing situations (where the non-bio mom wants to help out with nursing and is using the SNS) and in situations of chronic low supply where the baby relies heavily on milk for a long time.

 

For a ballpark figure (this is NOT written in stone as babies vary) an average 14 lb 4.5 month old, on average is taking around 35 oz of milk a day. So, you are making between 20 and 27 oz a day, which is great. :joy However, if he needs more than your body can make supplementing only makes sense, and the SNS seems to be the best way for you to nurse at the breast and supplement at the same time.

 

A small numbers of mamas simply don't make enough milk, sometimes it due to physiology (a lack of milk ducts, or hypoplastic breast and/or primary ductal insufficiency, bi-lateral or unilateral mastectomy, damage to the breast or ducts) or hormones (PCOS, Insulin Resistance, high estrogen or testosterone or vasopressin levels) or on occasion, an issue we simply can't pin down. Whatever the reason, if the baby needs a supplement, there is nothing wrong with using the SNS for as long as you both need it.

 


Keep up the good work, use the SNS if needed and keep doing what you are doing.  Blessings to you and your baby. :goodvibes


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#73 of 107 Old 12-07-2013, 09:10 AM
 
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I am needing a little boost because I am not quite pumping enough for when I go to work. My midwife told me to pump after every nursing (which is annoying but I will try) and take capsules or tincture of fenugreek and blessed thistle.

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#74 of 107 Old 12-10-2013, 11:59 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Wow.  I hadn't checked this post in a long time and am amazed at how much discussion it created.  A lot has happened since my original post.  My son is now almost 3 months.  I never saw an increase in my supply while doing the supplement, nurse, pump - every 3 hours routine, nor from all the different galactagogue foods and herbs I was taking.  When my son was 1 month, we moved back to El Salvador.  I brought a Medela Pump in Style with me (no hospital grade pumps outside of the hospitals here), but never found any opportunities to pump because my son is very high needs and I didn't have much support when I got here.  We had to switch from human milk supplement to formula (which broke my heart).  I started taking 60 mg domperidone and it seemed to make a difference, but since I wasn't pumping I'm not sure how much and I wasn't able to really increase the boost.  Unfortunately, supplementing with a bottle (the only thing that has been practical for me) has made my son like the breast less and less.  He will barely nurse during the day, but I can get him to nurse quite a bit at night.  His latch has also suffered since he won't open his mouth very wide.  I am trying to use paced feeding to get him to start liking the breast more now, but he is so fussy it can be awful trying to slow down his feedings, prompting a full on scream fest.  An LC I saw in the US also suggested I go up to 120 mg of domperidone for a few days, so I just started that yesterday.  I now have help during the day, but only from 8am-4pm so I can only get in 2-3 pumping sessions while she is here.  But I am doing that.  I just pumped today (2nd day of 120 mg domperidone) and got about .5 oz more than I usually get.  I'm trying to find a balance between keeping up hope and being realistic about having a breastfeeding experience that is very different from my expectations.  It has been extremely emotional and trying.  I'm pretty sure my low supply was due to my son's tongue tie (which didn't get diagnosed or clipped until he was 3 weeks old).  I see pictures from his first few days and my breasts were much fuller.  I feel like earlier intervention would have helped us out.  Because by the time we figured out something was wrong, he was 2.5 weeks old and a pound under his birth weight and still losing, so we went into emergency mode and started supplementing, which I don't think helped (lowered my supply and gave him a bad bottle habit), but was necessary for him.  Plus, I had already kind of missed the breastmilk production boat.  I also wish I could have gotten domperidone in the US, because I think it would have made a huge difference when I still had the support and time to be pumping every 3 hours.


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#75 of 107 Old 12-10-2013, 01:05 PM
 
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The only way I can pump is to wear two sports bras with slits cut over the nipples and then do "hands free" pumping while working on the computer. I pump while I'm driving to work. I pump 3 times per day, every 8 hours, and I'm able to pump about 20 oz per day. I then supplement about 15-18 oz per day. Since implementing bottles with nipples, my son won't nurse from me. With Domperidone 20 mg every 6 hours, I'm able to keep my supply up with pumping so infrequently. Since your baby is nursing, that should help you even more. It took almost 2 months before I saw the most effect from the Domperidone. I know that it's heartbreaking to have to supplement with formula, but keep offering the breast and pump if you can. Some breastmilk is better than none.

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#76 of 107 Old 12-10-2013, 01:20 PM
 
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I pump while I'm driving to work.

This sounds dangerously distracting. Can you wait until you arrive at work to pump? Most employers are required to provide you with pumping breaks and a place to pump.
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#77 of 107 Old 12-10-2013, 10:13 PM
 
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lilmamita, did you try or want to try an SNS or Lact-Aid? That way you could nurse from the breast and he would get the formula still but it would stimulate to produce more of your own milk. I have been using SNS for 4.5 months and I am sure that if I had used bottles instead, my supply would be much lower. It would be hard because his latch has suffered but just a suggestion. It has allowed me to have a good breast feeding relationship even though I still supplement with about 8-15oz per day. If they don't have them in El Salvador, maybe someone in the US could send one to you. Just a suggestion unless its something that wouldn't work for you.
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#78 of 107 Old 12-11-2013, 12:36 AM
 
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I wear a hands free bra and let it do it's thing while I'm driving, I'm not even paying attention to it. It takes me 30 min to pump because I'm an exclusive pumper, so no, I can't pump when I get to work. I'm training for a new job so it's only going to be for 2 more weeks anyway.

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#79 of 107 Old 12-11-2013, 10:21 AM - Thread Starter
 
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JNajla - That gives me some hope.  I think I'm only making like 4-6 oz of milk a day right now, so I hope I can at least increase substantially (I've given up hope on ever having a full supply).  I will be going back to work in January and am planning to pump as much as I can at work (I should be able to do it pretty much whenever, unless I am in a meeting).

 

Actiasluna - I actually have an SNS and used it some early on.  I was told you can't use them with powdered formulas, that they clog.  And powdered formula is all they have here.  I thought about trying it anyways since whether it clogs or not I am not using it right now.  I kind of wonder if I could get Simón back on breast with that.  I think it would be hard still, because he is accustomed to the bottle which is far more easy for him.  I may give it a try and see what happens.  I guess since he's a fuss bucket I worry some that I would get it all prepped and he'd still reject the breast with SNS.  Though now that I think about it, if that happens I can just pour the formula into a bottle and give it to him that way.

 

Sphinxy - I do all kinds of things while pumping.  The whole thing becomes background noise after a while.  I could see myself driving while pumping if I had a car.


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#80 of 107 Old 12-11-2013, 10:59 AM
 
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I get that a pumping bra is very convenient. I have one and enjoy the convenience of having my hands free in the comfort of my home. But I believe when we're talking about multitasking while driving we must ask ourselves, "would I want my child on the road with someone who was doing X?" When it comes to applying make up, reading a newspaper, or texting I say No... and now I can add pumping to that list also.

I'm getting off topic so I'll bow out of the conversation now.
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#81 of 107 Old 12-11-2013, 03:36 PM
 
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I hook the pump on and hook it up before I even start my car and then I don't touch it again until I park my car at work. So I'm not multitasking. It's no different than having a phone headset attached to my head.
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#82 of 107 Old 12-11-2013, 05:28 PM
 
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The bottles are in between you and the steering wheel, limiting your range of motion. Believe what you want about it being safe, but I wouldn't want to be on the road with someone who was pumping behind the wheel, and I wouldn't choose to put others in that position either.
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#83 of 107 Old 12-11-2013, 10:06 PM
 
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lilmamita, I use the powdered formula only in my SNS. You just have to keep your eye on it to get on the clogs before it gets too much, otherwise baby gets frustrated. The way that I clean the tubes is that I run water through them by squeezing the bottle when I'm cleaning it, if that makes sense. If its really clogged, I sort of squish the tubes between my fingers all the way down the length of them and am able to squeeze it out. Then I run water through it. I try to do it with nice hot water to loosen the clogs. Also, at the top, where the holes are in the lid part, that is connected to the tubes, (I hope this makes sense) that part can get the most clogged and it took me months to notice..so, I sort of carefully squish the tubes so that whatever is in that top part comes out the holes. Sometimes I replace the whole thing, for example if they break. But mostly I clean them and its very doable. I hope all that made sense, I have the worst baby brain these days.

I know the SNS can be very very trying to get used to. I was extremely stubborn and have totally mastered it. If it wasn't for the SNS, I would not produce the 20-30oz per day that I produce. I don't pump, because I can't get any in a pump and I find the very discouraging. My baby is better at extracting the milk anyways and so is yours. Remember, if its not working, you can always do a bottle. smile.gif
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#84 of 107 Old 12-12-2013, 08:30 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Also, just wanted to add:

 

My struggle with supply has been extremely emotionally trying.  And I found it extremely frustrating when people who hadn't had much trouble establishing a breastmilk supply would make suggestions like "Eat oatmeal" or "Drink Mother's Milk tea"  I wish it were that simple.  I know people are just trying to be helpful, but every time someone says that stuff it is like a little stab at my heart.


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#85 of 107 Old 12-12-2013, 06:27 PM
 
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lilmamita, I am right there with you. I cried for months every day about my supply. Months. And I have tried EVERYTHING. I am so tired of people saying eat oatmeal or alfalfa sprouts or oatmeal cookies. Pfff. I don't believe that the type of food you eat helps supply. I beleive having a healthy diet is good but not certain foods.. I have seen no personal evidence and I've tried it all. Many people who have never experienced low supply (like really low, like you and I and many others experience) have a hard time understanding the heartbreak that is related to not being able to feed your child when all you want to do is just that. Using formula broke my heart so much and still does. But eventually I had to stop crying, for my son. For myself, I am just happy when the amount of formula he eats goes down. Then I feel a little better because I know he is getting a little more breast milk. I totally how you feel. Many of my friends think I've obsessed too much over my milk supply. (Their milk was always good or oversupply) So I've stopped talking about it because it seems too emotional for people to hear.
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#86 of 107 Old 12-13-2013, 09:29 AM
 
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What do the bottles being in front of me have to do with anything? How is that any worse than people who eat in their car, talk to the passenger, yell at their kids in the backseat or talking on the phone? Being able to pump during commutes helps to continue pumping. It takes me 30 min to pump since I'm an exclusive pumper. It's a major time saver for me.

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@JNajla - first off, I understand that you are an exclusive pumper and that it takes you 30 minutes to pump. You don't have to convince me that pumping while driving is incredibly convenient for you. But convenience has absolutely nothing to do with whether it is safe. There are a great many things that I would do during the time it takes me to drive to work if I thought they were safe - dry my hair for example. But it's not safe, and in my opinion, neither is pumping. You aren't going to convince me otherwise, so there's really no point in continuing this discussion. If it were only you who I thought was put it danger by this distraction then I wouldn't have even continued to respond this much. But when you get behind the wheel of a car you are responsible for how your actions affect others, too. I have used a double electric pump with a pumping bra, I know how it feels and how it impacts my range of motion. And my bottom line is that I wouldn't want me or my kid on the road with someone who was pumping. I understand that you disagree with me and won't be changing your behavior based on my opinion. So now is when we agree to disagree and walk away.
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#88 of 107 Old 12-13-2013, 11:18 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JNajla View Post

What do the bottles being in front of me have to do with anything? How is that any worse than people who eat in their car, talk to the passenger, yell at their kids in the backseat or talking on the phone? Being able to pump during commutes helps to continue pumping. It takes me 30 min to pump since I'm an exclusive pumper. It's a major time saver for me.

 

You are sacrificing your mobility by having that gear there, as well as putting yourself at great risk if the airbags deploy and smash the bottles into your face and chest. 

 

Almost EVERYTHING you have listed has been proven to cause accidents and increase passenger mortality. Headsets especially were just part of a major study that proved they are no better than hands on talking on the phone. Don't kid yourself saying this is safe.

 

Somethings you can choose to do, like eating and pumping in the car, other things are beyond your control, like needing to handle kids in the backseat.

 

I think what Sphinxy is saying, that I echo, is that a few ounces of breastmilk are not enough of a health benefit to cancel out the risk of distracted driving. Seriously. The studies show that 1/3 breastmilk is enough to see most of the benefits compared to exclusive formula feeding. 

 

Do you do this with kids in the car!? 

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#89 of 107 Old 12-15-2013, 07:26 PM
 
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No kids in the car. I think you're overreacting, and I will continue to pump occasionally while driving if I need to. Apparently everyone on here is a model driver who doesn't listen to music, doesn't talk to the passenger, doesn't talk to your kids in the backseat, doesn't eat or drink in the car, or ever talk on your phone or look at it for that matter. And comparing having a pump strapped on to using a hairdryer while driving is just beyond ridiculous. Seriously. Go be judgmental somewhere else. *rolls eyes*

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#90 of 107 Old 12-17-2013, 04:59 AM
 
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You're right, the hair dryer comparison was ridiculous, because unlike pumping, I could still put the hair dryer down in an emergency if I needed to.

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