How much bone broth = calcium in dairy? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 17 Old 12-20-2008, 01:00 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I may be a bit premature in posting on this, but today its looking possible that my DS is sensitive to the cultured goat dairy that I eat. If this is true, I'm trying to figure out how much bone broth I would shoot for eating a day, considering the dairy recommendation for pregnant or nursing mothers is 4 servings (4 quarts of fluid milk). I can't find a rec anywhere....
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#2 of 17 Old 12-20-2008, 01:09 AM
 
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This article has the most detail on bone broth I've ever come across -
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/m...0/ai_n10299306
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#3 of 17 Old 12-20-2008, 04:17 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks velcromom. It had wonderful info in it. I think the info I want is impossible to find - basically a nutritional label that will help me feel okay about not having dairy. Obviously I won't continue to have it if its causing my little one problems, but it sure we be nice to be confident of the bone broth. I feel like I can't uncover anything beyond "It's a great source for calcium." i think my tactic is going to be to have bone broth as much as I would dairy. It's a lot of soup, but 'm hard pressed to see how bone broth would typically have a lot more calcium than dairy and have that not be made explicitly clear at least by Fallon.

I hope this isn't the case though - I can't tell you how much I'll miss dairy
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#4 of 17 Old 12-20-2008, 05:31 PM
 
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Do you like carob? In the NT book it says that carob has three times the calcium as mothers milk.
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#5 of 17 Old 12-20-2008, 07:09 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blessedmum View Post
Do you like carob? In the NT book it says that carob has three times the calcium as mothers milk.
I do, but I'll have to introduce slowly, as we're working out allergies. Is it bioavailable? I'll need to read up on it in NT....
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#6 of 17 Old 12-20-2008, 10:29 PM
 
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It's hard with bone broth. Everyone makes it slightly differently. Even if you follow the same basic method, you could use a different size pot, or a different size carcass. And different pots allow different amounts of evaporation. The concentration matters a lot here. If you don't want to drink that much bone broth, you could boil it down so that it's more concentrated.

A Yahoo group that I'm on had a discussion about this awhile ago. One woman actually tested a batch of her broth. It had 400mg/liter of calcium. I was surprised, because I would have thought that it would have more. But she didn't really describe well how she made it, and of course we didn't know her quantities. I've wanted to test mine (we each kind of make it pretty close to the same each time, I would think), but haven't. I've been told that there are tests at pet stores to test the calcium in water. I haven't looked into it, though.

In that same discussion (I think), someone posted a link to an article discussing traditional Korean (I think) bone broth, and described the process, which sounded an awful lot like the NT method. It said that there were pretty high levels of calcium in it (something like 100mg/Tbs., IIRC). But, I'm not finding that article, so I can't swear to it.

Anyway, if you really want to know, then you'll probably want test your own broth. You could even do some experimenting and play around with different methods and different concentrations, testing the different batches and keeping records, and figure out what works best for you.



As for the carob, comparing a powder and a liquid is a bit misleading. I'm not sure of the calcium content of mother's milk, but you'd have to eat quite large quantities of carob to make much of a difference. Carob flour has just 28mg calcium per Tbs. That's not bad, but how much of it could a person consume on a daily basis??

Another good source of calcium is nettle infusion. 1 oz. of dry nettles in a quart jar, boiling water poured over and allowed to sit for several hours or overnight, has 1000mg/quart, according to Susun Weed. The only problem is getting the infusion down! I find it to be fairly yucky. And I find it hard to remember to keep making the infusions. It is good stuff, though, in terms of the effects.

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#7 of 17 Old 12-20-2008, 10:37 PM
 
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Sorry for double posting here, but I remembered something else. Chia seeds are a pretty good source of calcium. They have 76mg/Tbs. I put a couple Tbs. in a glass of water kefir, stir every few minutes until they stay suspended (otherwise they clump up). I let it sit for a few hours. I figure this takes care of most of any phytates, and then I drink it down. The mixture thickens. It's not unpleasant, and in fact it's pretty nice. Apparantly in Mexico they sometimes serve lemonade with chia seeds in it.

Of course, this wouldn't take care of your daily need for calcium, but it would certainly help, added on to all the other dietary sources.

Christie ~ proud Mama to : 5/01, and : 3/07; and proud wife to my since 1992. We have 13 and 2 : It's looking more and more like either a farm or a zoo around here.
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#8 of 17 Old 12-20-2008, 11:41 PM
 
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Blackstrap molasses has loads of calcium.
Sesame seeds,
Kelp, and
almonds do too.

I prefer red raspberry leaf infusion to nettles. Nettles is too strong for me, but chilled RRL infusion is just fine.

I also take Garden of life Living Calcium with Natural Calm Magnesium. I take this on days that I don't drink the RRL.

About the carob and allergies: I do think it would be hard to eat enough to get the daily requirement of calcium. Carob is very constipating. If you don't believe me, well just trust me (or find out for yourself.) It is known for helping with loose stool. Many people agree with me about this. I couldn't see consuming more than a tablespoon a day. Anymore, and oh not so fun, ouch!
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#9 of 17 Old 12-21-2008, 12:06 AM
 
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Nettle infusions are much easier to drink fresh while still warm - I do smaller batches so I don't have to choke it down later when it's chilled and gross.

Postpartum doula & certified breastfeeding educator, mama to an amazing girl (11/05) and a wee little boy (3/13).

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#10 of 17 Old 12-21-2008, 12:56 AM
 
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Oh, I definitely prefer the taste of RRL. But it doesn't have the high amount of calcium. I tried it, because I read that it was a good source of calcium (no actual amounts given, though), but it just didn't help like the nettles do.

Since it's supposed to sit for several hours to pull all the minerals out, I can't really drink it freshly brewed. Maybe next time I'll try heating it up before I drink it.

Christie ~ proud Mama to : 5/01, and : 3/07; and proud wife to my since 1992. We have 13 and 2 : It's looking more and more like either a farm or a zoo around here.
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#11 of 17 Old 12-21-2008, 05:52 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChristieB View Post
Since it's supposed to sit for several hours to pull all the minerals out, I can't really drink it freshly brewed. Maybe next time I'll try heating it up before I drink it.
I leave a tea cozy over it while it's brewing away - usually 3-4 hrs. It's still warm when it's done, and thick and rich and feels very like broth. I've never tried heating it up before, that's an idea.

Postpartum doula & certified breastfeeding educator, mama to an amazing girl (11/05) and a wee little boy (3/13).

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#12 of 17 Old 12-21-2008, 06:00 AM
 
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I know its not totally TF, but canned salmon with bones has a lot of calcium in it. Because of the cooking process, the bones are soft, and can me mashed in with the salmon. I don't know exactly what the effects of the cooking are on the salmon though. I was looking this up for a lactose intolerant, non-tf friend of mine who worried about his calcium intake. some greens, such as dandilion greens and I can't recall what else, are also quite high in calcium. I think that including lots of high calcium foods might be more successful than just focusing on one and trying to eat enough of that one source, but thats just me.

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#13 of 17 Old 12-21-2008, 12:15 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebirdmama1 View Post
Blackstrap molasses has loads of calcium.
Sesame seeds,
Kelp, and
almonds do too.
Ya know... along with the chia seeds mentioned, and carob, this is starting to sound like a raw bar/nut ball kind of thing.

I'm currently eating a Raw Revolution "Live Food Bar" and it's really yummy and I actually feel good afterward, or else a prepackaged bar would not have become my Official First Breakfast. Anyway... the ingredients are very straightforward: nuts, agave nectar, dates, cocoa powder, sprouted flax seed. Sooo... maybe instead... almonds, sesame seeds, molasses, carob... yeah... and one of my flavors of food bar has spirulina, so I'm sure a bit of kelp would work fine, too.

And they might be darn tasty!

For what it's worth, thanks to food allergies I haven't been getting enough calcium for years. I haven't been able to get a military doc to CARE, so I haven't had any bone density testing done, but... I seem to be ok.
There have been times when I worry... times when I take a supplement... but most of the time I figure that a LOT of people didn't drink milk traditionally, and they were fine.

SAHM of Kayla (11/98) Hunter (8/03) Jo (1/04) : Jared (2/05) Camelia (12/07) Hope/Chance (11/08) and Jack (12/09)
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#14 of 17 Old 12-21-2008, 02:32 PM
 
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Sorry, no specifics here, but I wanted to mention that in the Chinese culture, we hardly drink dairy, but in many areas of China, bone broth is available at every meal. In my sister's household, they don't drink any water at mealtimes, but the food is accompanied by a huge bowl of bone broth. There's usually very little salt in as it's consumed like water at a meal.

The other benefit of broth is that the gelatin in the broth helps you digest your food. I also like that it's full of many other minerals, and while many people are conscious of their vitamin intake, they don't take in enough minerals.
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#15 of 17 Old 12-21-2008, 06:19 PM
 
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I know that there has been some debate about whether or not pressure cooking is "TF" but most of the discussion I've seen concludes with giving it the pass I got a pressure cooker for making my bone broths. It's much faster, about 1.5-2 hours, and many of the bones end up very brittle, some of the smaller ones mash up really easily and almost melt away into the broth. I'd imagine that it leaches out as much or more of the minerals than regular simmering. Testing a batch of simmered broth and a batch of pressure cooked broth would be very interesting.
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#16 of 17 Old 12-22-2008, 01:57 AM
 
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Excessive heat could also eliminate certain things... maybe even calcium I am not sure. But it would be interesting.
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#17 of 17 Old 12-22-2008, 10:02 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Junegoddess View Post
Ya know... along with the chia seeds mentioned, and carob, this is starting to sound like a raw bar/nut ball kind of thing.

I'm currently eating a Raw Revolution "Live Food Bar" and it's really yummy and I actually feel good afterward, or else a prepackaged bar would not have become my Official First Breakfast. Anyway... the ingredients are very straightforward: nuts, agave nectar, dates, cocoa powder, sprouted flax seed. Sooo... maybe instead... almonds, sesame seeds, molasses, carob... yeah... and one of my flavors of food bar has spirulina, so I'm sure a bit of kelp would work fine, too.

And they might be darn tasty!
Now we have got to make one. If you do, let us know how it goes! Sounds yummy!!!
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