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Old 03-16-2009, 08:04 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Just wondering if anyone would be interested in a discussion of Jan Kwasniewski's "Optimal Diet."

It was developed a couple of decades ago, and it's quite popular in Poland, though still not very well known elsewhere. It's low-carbohydrate and very high-fat, with an emphasis on organ meats, cream, butter, cheese, eggs, gelatinous broths, and fatty pork products. The basic idea is that you have to keep your carbs, fat, and protein in a specific "optimal" ratio, which works out to about 80% of calories from fat. Even by TF standards, that's a lot of fat. For instance, only a few types of cheese have that much. Of course, you can always spread butter on the other kinds. The diet is supposed to be successful at putting many different health problems into remission -- including diabetes and autoimmune conditions -- and it's also recommended as a regular way of eating for everyone, including during pregnancy and lactation. (Dr. Kwasniewski is very pro-breastfeeding, and has harsh words for those who think it's weird to nurse a 4- or 5-year-old, LOL.)

Two of the books have been translated into English, but you have to order them directly from the publisher in Poland. My copies just arrived today; I've only had time to glance at them, but I'm really looking forward to reading them through and trying out this theory of "optimal nutrition."
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Old 03-16-2009, 08:55 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Some interesting ideas I've come across so far:

- The "optimal diet" is contrasted with the more common "pasture" and "piggish" styles of eating. "Pasture" is a high-carb, low-fat, grain- and plant-based diet. It's basically the way peasants ate in most cultures. According to Kwasniewski, it's not ideal, but it's not terrible, either.

"Piggish" is pretty much the typical affluent Western diet that mixes substantial amounts of carbs, fat, and protein all together (like a bucket of slops ). This is supposed to be very bad; I haven't read all the details, but I'd guess it's because the body can function as a carb-burning system or a fat-burning system, but not both at once. According to this theory, the absolute worst approach is to get 35-40% of calories from carbs, and the rest from a mix of protein and fat. He believes that such people would be much better off with 60% of calories from carbs... though of course the OD, with only ~10% carbs, would be better still.

This would help to explain why some people (like my DH) seem to gain weight, and not be especially healthy, when they shift toward a more TF way of eating. They've increased their intake of good fats, but they're also eating too many carbs and too much meat -- maybe because their feedback mechanisms are out of whack, or maybe just from long-standing habit. Even if all the foods they're eating are nutrient-dense, they still crave more food than they need. The author of A Life Unburdened had this problem, and found that he had to practice strict portion control, even after going TF.

- According to Kwasniewski, people with the best health and longest lifespan tend to be on the small and slim side. Optimally fed children will likely be smaller than their peers, and this is a good thing. We shouldn't strive to have children who are tall or stocky, as this is often a sign of endocrine disruption caused by a faulty diet. Ideally, menstruation shouldn't start until the late teens; if it starts at age 12 or earlier, it's a strong indicator of hormone problems. (I've heard this last point from many other sources that I consider reliable, and it fits with what I've observed in my own family.) The phenomenon of early puberty is associated with a shift toward "piggish" diets; "pasture" and "optimal" eaters tend to have slower development.


Lots to think about there. Feel free to dispute.
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Old 03-17-2009, 03:43 AM
 
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- According to Kwasniewski, people with the best health and longest lifespan tend to be on the small and slim side. Optimally fed children will likely be smaller than their peers, and this is a good thing. We shouldn't strive to have children who are tall or stocky, as this is often a sign of endocrine disruption caused by a faulty diet. Ideally, menstruation shouldn't start until the late teens; if it starts at age 12 or earlier, it's a strong indicator of hormone problems. (I've heard this last point from many other sources that I consider reliable, and it fits with what I've observed in my own family.) The phenomenon of early puberty is associated with a shift toward "piggish" diets; "pasture" and "optimal" eaters tend to have slower development.
Aaaaah, interesting. Makes me feel a little better about my slender paleo-eating kiddos. I'm going to read a little more about the Optimal Diet and get back to this post.
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Old 03-17-2009, 04:02 AM
 
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I thought that was interesting too - my lo is definitely on the small side but somehow she's sturdy but slim at the same time. Sounds like an interesting book
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Old 03-17-2009, 02:14 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Haven't been able to get back to reading the books yet, but just wanted to share some more links:

Praise the Lard -- "The 'Polish Atkins diet' recommends eating prodigious amounts of animal fat. Can this possibly be good for you?" (Chicago Tribune, 2004)

New Diet: 'Fit Through Fat' -- short news piece with video (CBS Evening News, 2005)

Give Kwasniewski's Homo Optimus Diet a Try -- a brief summary of the diet, with additional links (newtreatments.org)

Hyperlipid -- a blog about very-high-fat diets in general. Has some specific discussion of the OD, especially in the comments section. Lots of interesting stuff.
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Old 03-18-2009, 12:01 PM
 
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thanks for those links. I think this makes a lot of sense. Where did you order the book from? That hyperlipid blog is pretty convincing about fats. Are you staying totally SCD legal at the same time?
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Old 03-18-2009, 04:54 PM - Thread Starter
 
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The books are only available from the publisher in Poland; there's a link on the main English Optimal Diet site (see the first post), as well as on the newtreatments.org site. They actually showed up quite fast after I got around to placing the order. It's a bit of extra work, as you have to fax them your signature for the credit card payment... what can I say, I'm getting spoiled in these days of Paypal and one-click ordering. :

After reading some more, I'm a bit confused about how a child or a pregnant woman would go about transitioning onto the diet. It sounds as if the rules are somewhat relaxed for them; they're supposed to be able to eat according to instinct, and find their own ratio, within reason (i.e., you serve a variety of "optimal" foods, and don't make high-carb treats available). But this presumes that they've already been on the diet for a while -- or, in the case of children, that they were weaned onto it. If you take it up later on, there seems to be an initial stage of major ketosis and often weight loss, lasting a few days for children, and a few weeks for adults. I don't think this would be advisable during late pregnancy, and I'm not sure about how it would work for my skinny DD1 either. She tends toward low blood sugar, and often gets sick before breakfast if she doesn't eat a lot of carbs at dinner. She also has some fat intolerance; this has improved since she went GF, but I think it would be best to wait a while to see if it improves even more.

In any case, I've had to put off experimenting with the diet, as I have a GI bug that I'm pretty sure I picked up from my darling toddler. (It's likely not diet-related, as she and I are eating quite different things these days.) So I'm back to scrambled eggs and chicken soup for now. When I do get around to trying it out -- which will probably be after the new baby is born -- I'll definitely stay 100% SCD legal. It looks like the person who wrote the newtreatments.org article is on the SCD as well.

Meanwhile, I'm going to keep the carbs reasonably low, and enjoy cooking yummy treats with my freezer stockpile of organ meats, Organic Prairie bacon, and US Wellness ground pork that's "72% lean" (i.e. 28% fat, LOL). If I happen to exceed my optimal carb range, and slip into piggishness along the way.... well, you are what you eat, right?
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Old 03-19-2009, 05:42 PM
 
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I'd like to read more about it, though feeling like I don't have a lot of time right no, but I have realized that having enough fat is key for me. I used to think it was protein, and that's part of it, but as long as I am eating enough fat, I feel so much better, less tired, no cravings, etc. As soon as I go too high on the carbs, the carvings start and the cycle starts all over again.
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Old 03-20-2009, 05:27 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Last night, I re-read parts of Nutrition & Physical Degeneration, trying to see where the different societies might fall on the pasture/piggish/optimal scale. I wrote a detailed post about this, but it got erased somehow. Anyway, it looks like the Swiss villagers were fat-burners. Weston Price says that their slices of rye bread were accompanied by equal amounts of cheese, and they also drank whole cow's or goat's milk. They also evidently ate butter (given the high value they placed on the June butter), and they drank bowls of cream as a treat or a health tonic. There's no mention of sweets; if they had them, it would likely have only been on special feast days. Maybe a honey-rye cake? Yum yum.

OTOH, the Gaels in the outer Hebrides appear to have been pasture-eaters. Their only animal foods were fish and shellfish, which are high-protein and relatively low in fat, so they wouldn't have been able to eat a lot of fat without getting a great deal of excess protein (which WAP says didn't happen in traditional societies). It looks as if they got the bulk of their energy from oatcakes and oatmeal. They were also healthy until refined foods were introduced, which kind of challenges the notion that northern Europeans aren't adapted to eating a grain-based diet. Although, given that the Swiss mountain folk were said to have "some of the finest physiques in all Europe," there's some evidence for saturated animal fats as being a more ideal source of energy.

Then, out of curiosity, I took a look at the WAPF board members' food journals on the "How We Eat" page. This is pretty old information -- I'm not sure if they still eat this way -- but still, it was interesting. Sally Fallon's Day 1 is the closest to "optimal" eating: 70% of calories from fat, below 20% carbs & protein. The other two days, she eats a fair amount of sweets (2 tbsp raw honey & 3/4 cup ice cream respectively), which makes a big difference in the ratios. Still, she eats a lot less carbohydrate than do many TFers... including, until recently, my own family.

Mary Enig eats a fairly typical American diet, but with TF versions of everything, apart from occasional indulgences like organic oreos. This is fairly similar to how our family used to eat. She spends all her time in the Kwasniewski "Forbidden Zone" of 35-45% calories from carbs. Yikes. (BTW, I find it quite amusing that JK's "Forbidden Zone" is pretty much as same as the "Zone diet," which is 40% carb, 30% fat, & 30% protein.)

Geoffrey Morell floats in and out of the FZ, with the consumption of raw honey and ice cream being the deciding factors. Same thing with Cherie Calvert, whose extra carbs come from honey, juice, and dried fruit... and Linda Forristal, who goes from 16% carb on day 1 (with a breakfast of fried eggs and toast), to 33% on day 2 (with a breakfast of pancakes, maple syrup, and fruit salad).

Tom Cowan's menu is interesting. It has moderate carbohydrate and reasonably high fat, but it's also very high calorie... almost twice what a typical adult male is supposed to require... so it ends up being very high in protein, over 200 grams/day. This is a no-no by Dr. K's standards. Dr. C must have very strong kidneys. How on earth does he manage to put all this food away, anyway? Is he building the pyramids single-handedly or something? LOL
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Old 03-29-2009, 02:53 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I found some more detailed diet information for the Gaels and Swiss on the PPNF web site. The data was taken from a journal article written in 1933 by Weston A. Price. The protein/fat/carb numbers aren't given, but from my calculations, the Swiss mountain valley folk actually tended toward the higher-carbohydrate end of things, with 20% calories from protein, 35% fat, 45% carbs. The Gaels of the Outer Hebrides were around the same for carbs, but they had a lower fat intake than the Swiss, and about 30% of calories from protein. This was a surprise, since WAPF claims that such high protein levels are dangerous and weren't consumed by healthy primitive societies (see their critique of the Zone diet).

It isn't clear if Price's lists were supposed to be examples of what a typical adult would actually eat in a day, or if they were more of an average of the intakes of children, adults, different seasons, different activity levels, etc. From his writings, he was clearly more concerned with minerals and fat-soluble nutrients than with calories and macronutrient levels. Still, it's interesting data.
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Old 03-29-2009, 03:03 PM - Thread Starter
 
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In a different thread, I mentioned the claims that the Optimal Diet can put type 1/insulin-dependent diabetes into remission. Just wanted to add a couple more links that address this subject. (There are said to be hundreds of successful cases in Poland, but it appears that most of the data and testimonials haven't been translated into English.)

Optimal Diet -- Treatment of Disease
Optimal Nutrition versus Atkins diet (PDF)
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Old 03-29-2009, 03:59 PM
 
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subbing. thanks
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Old 03-30-2009, 05:57 PM
 
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I have been thinking about this all day long and boy, these diets seem so very right!

Thank you OP for bringing this to my attention. Now I've got even *more* reading to do!
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Old 03-31-2009, 09:47 PM
 
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Thanks for the "food for thought".
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Old 04-01-2009, 02:07 PM
 
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I have been playing around with this diet for a few days and am also really trying to transition to eating more local foods (pork, pork, pork... (pastured of course)). I am eating sausage or thick bacon for breakfast and using the grease to sautee beans or veggies throughout the day. It tastes great and I feel ok, but I am getting some gallbladder area pain that I usually don't get even when I eat high amounts of coconut oil or olive oil. Does anyone know how I can digest pork fat better?

Jessi wife of mama to Lil D (10/08)
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Old 04-01-2009, 04:10 PM
 
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i think it may be a stomach acid problem a/o enzyme problem. either way, i think you have to have really strong digestion to eat this way.

i am going try some of the ideas on this thread:

http://www.mothering.com/discussions....php?t=1063558

Jessi wife of mama to Lil D (10/08)
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Old 04-01-2009, 06:42 PM
 
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Old 04-03-2009, 02:36 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Pain in the liver region is mentioned in Optimal Nutrition as a possible side effect early in the diet. Dr. K says that this can happen when gallstones are shrinking and getting ready to pass out of the gall bladder. He suggests eating smaller portions more often, to reduce the strength of the gall bladder's contractions, until the stone has passed and the pain goes away. If the symptoms suggest that a stone is causing trouble when passing through the bile duct (continued pain, dark urine, yellow stool), he recommends taking a pain reliever/antispasmodic and going to bed, and letting the stone work its way through. He says that it's extremely unlikely that a stone would be trapped once it gets into the bile duct, since the duct is the same diameter all along its length.

Another thing to keep in mind is that the diet has other "rules" besides the quantity of fat. It's considered essential to have several eggs per day, or a couple of eggs + a few extra yolks (with some of the yolks raw or lightly cooked), as well as bone broth soups and organ meats pretty much every day. These foods provide the vitamins, minerals, and amino acids that are necessary for good digestion.

The OD also doesn't allow for a large amount of vegetables, beans, and other fibrous foods: "Fiber is literally a load of cr@p that results in a weakening of the system." The carbohydrate allowance can be taken in the form of grains, potatoes, or other starchy root vegetables, or (if desired) from fruit. Non-starchy vegetables are used sparingly. Dr. K points out that vitamins were only discovered due to observation of their associated deficiency syndromes, which occurred in societies that ate diets based on plant foods. He says that vitamin deficiencies, including scurvy, are unknown among people who eat plenty of meat, organs, and eggs. (I'd certainly believe that about raw animal foods... not so sure about cooked, though.)

With all these factors involved, it seems as if the best way to try out the diet would be to use the suggested menus on the web site. The trouble is, they're very challenging for Americans to follow, on both a cultural and practical level... especially on Day 5, when you're supposed to have homemade headcheese for breakfast, and homemade blood sausage for dinner. Personally, I'm not squeamish about organ meats, but I don't enjoy the prospect of trying to *find* half a pig's head, let alone having to prepare it. I've made brawn with just pig's feet before, and I've found it quite tricky to get all the little bones out. Not to mention that you're left with a very greasy mess to clean up.

I guess this is why the diet hasn't caught on much outside the expatriate Polish community. They even have an Optimal Diet restaurant in Chicago. Without that kind of support -- or an alternate set of menus, which provide similar ratios and nutrients with easier-to-manage recipes -- I'm not sure the diet is going to take off here any time soon.

The Hyperlipid author is British, and he seems to have incorporated the OD principles into his diet, without necessarily copying all the particulars. In particular, he doesn't seem to eat a lot of very exotic "variety meats"... mainly just liver & kidneys. For now, I've been following his example.
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Old 04-03-2009, 11:32 AM
 
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Call me vain... but when I eat too high a percentage of fat I notice that my face gets rounder. Also looking at cultures who ate alot of fat predominantly.. such as the eskimos.. I do not find them to be a beautiful race and I think it has to do with their diet.

Honestly I think the key to health is insulin and therefor the proper balance of fat, protein, and carbs is whichever ratio has the lowest insulin impact.. And I think it is the zone diet where they say 40% complex carbs, 30 fat and protein. But I could be wrong......

Another thing I read about alot of fat is that it inhibits your secretion of acid in the stomach which could disrupt your digestion of the protein that you do eat.

I am not saying that fat makes your body fat... which it doesn't seem to especially the animal types from grassfed with the natural CLA.. but I think it makes your face rounder
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Old 04-08-2009, 12:30 PM
 
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Haven't been able to get back to reading the books yet, but just wanted to share some more links:

Praise the Lard -- "The 'Polish Atkins diet' recommends eating prodigious amounts of animal fat. Can this possibly be good for you?" (Chicago Tribune, 2004)

New Diet: 'Fit Through Fat' -- short news piece with video (CBS Evening News, 2005)

Give Kwasniewski's Homo Optimus Diet a Try -- a brief summary of the diet, with additional links (newtreatments.org)

Hyperlipid -- a blog about very-high-fat diets in general. Has some specific discussion of the OD, especially in the comments section. Lots of interesting stuff.

Thanks so much for these links! I especially like the Hyperlipid blog and have read half of it already this week. I have been motivated to cut way back on grains and omega-6 vegetable oils. I think they have been compromising my weight and my blood sugar and maybe my thyroid. I will keep you posted.
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Old 04-08-2009, 01:30 PM
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I guess this is why the diet hasn't caught on much outside the expatriate Polish community. They even have an Optimal Diet restaurant in Chicago.
I've read a couple of mentions of this in articles, but never seen anyone give a name of the deli or restaurant. Do you have any more information about this? Thanks!
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Old 04-08-2009, 02:18 PM
 
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Also looking at cultures who ate alot of fat predominantly.. such as the eskimos.. I do not find them to be a beautiful race and I think it has to do with their diet.
oh, thanks!

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Old 04-08-2009, 07:33 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I've read a couple of mentions of this in articles, but never seen anyone give a name of the deli or restaurant. Do you have any more information about this? Thanks!
From what I've heard, this is the place; it's on Milwaukee Avenue.

Calma Optimal Foods

HTH... If you get to go there, have some extra sausage for me!
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Old 04-08-2009, 08:11 PM - Thread Starter
 
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oh, thanks!
Yeah... I'm not sure what to make of such a comment, except to say that I disagree strongly with that whole line of thinking (in more ways than one). Even if we set aside the issue of denigrating other racial/ethnic groups, there are so many things that seem attractive to various people, but are really quite unnatural and unhealthy: the "emaciated supermodel" look, foot-binding, those neck rings... So I'm just not seeing the logic in judging the appropriateness of one's diet by examining the shadows of one's profile in the mirror every day.

BTW, in homeopathy, a thin face with prominent cheekbones is associated with the syphilitic miasm, which is an inherited taint caused by a relative with syphilis somewhere in the ancestral line. Despite the popular notion that such cheekbones are "glamorous," the homeopath would see them as suggesting a family tendency to heart disease, cancer, mental illness, violence, serious birth defects, and many other disorders that are prevalent in modern life (though, interestingly, not found among the Inuit or other societies studied by WAP). If that could be cured by some extra helpings of pate and bacon, it would be wonderful indeed.
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Old 04-08-2009, 08:29 PM
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If you get to go there, have some extra sausage for me!
I will most definitely check it out and report back. Thank you!
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Old 04-18-2009, 08:14 PM
 
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hummingmom, how is your diet coming along?
there is so much info out there on the www.... it's nice to hear from actual people, not marketers!
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Old 04-19-2009, 03:25 AM - Thread Starter
 
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hummingmom, how is your diet coming along?
All good so far, thanks. I'm still trying to balance my meals, but will occasionally snack on extra protein or fruit if I feel like I need them. I'm a lot less hungry than I remember being at this stage of my other pregnancies, but I'm gaining the right amount of weight, so it seems as if I'm well nourished.

It will be interesting to see if my blood pressure goes up at the end of the third trimester, as has happened with all my previous pregnancies. There were never any other signs of pre-eclampsia, but still, it caused a lot of worry, and I'd be very happy to avoid it this time. Dr. K also claims that women on the diet will have a painless childbirth; not so sure I believe that one, but it would certainly be welcome.

I'm still trying to figure out whether or not to try the Optimal Diet for the children. It's one thing to put oneself on such an extreme way of eating, but it takes more of a leap of faith to do it with a three year old. I've thought about just limiting concentrated sweeteners and fruits, and letting them choose their own proportions of everything else, but I'm concerned that they'd end up eating too much protein.
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Old 04-19-2009, 06:07 AM
 
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wow, a painless childbirth! interesting. you'll have to report back on that one
I had a bit of high blood pressure at 41 weeks of pregnancy.... mostly because I didn't want "them" to induce me, so I would get "all worked up" at appointments. when I went into actual labour, my blood pressure was normal! go figure!
were you on a much higher carb and protein diet during your last 2 pregnancy?

I am trying to figure out my protein balance and trying to find healthy sources of fat that arent dairy and are lower protein (my daughter and I are dairy intolerant at the moment), any suggestions?

congrats on your wee one on the way
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Old 04-19-2009, 09:23 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by bella_stranger View Post
were you on a much higher carb and protein diet during your last 2 pregnancy?
With #1, I was eating mostly TF and following the Brewer diet. Lots of high-quality fats, but also lots of grains, potatoes, meat, fish, and cheese... probably much more food than I needed. When my blood pressure started going up, I increased the protein even more, adding extra yogurt and other protein-rich dairy (which didn't seem to help). I gained 50 lb., which seems really excessive in hindsight. Maybe I'm wrong, but I don't think women in traditional societies typically gain anywhere near that much.

Kwasniewski talks about the "obesity of the poor," which is caused by lots of cheap carbs and a scarcity of good quality proteins and fats. This reminds me of the high incidence of pre-eclampsia in the poor Southern women that Dr. Brewer worked with. Getting extra protein certainly helped them. But I haven't eaten anything resembling that kind of diet for the last 15 years. I've been on and off dairy, but I've been fortunate enough to always be able to have meat and fish. : If I ever became obese, it would be what Dr. K calls the "obesity of the rich." So maybe I had the "gestational hypertension of the rich?" (I've heard it speculated that PE and GH are caused by the same underlying mechanism, but with GH your organs are healthy enough to handle the extra burden, whereas with PE they start to fail. It makes sense that my organs would be in better shape than those of a woman who was living on Wonder Bread.)

With #2, I was on the SCD, so I was relatively limited in carbs, but I did have a ton of protein, maybe even more than with #1 (baked goods made with nut flour and cottage cheese, lots of meat and eggs, yogurt, etc.).

#3 was very different. I had little appetite, especially for meat and other "heavy" foods, and was craving salads and vinegary things. I did eat pretty well, with adequate but not excessive protein (mostly from dairy), though I probably went a bit heavy on fruit and refined GF breads. It turned out that the baby was born with congenital defects, which appear to have been there since the first month of the pregnancy. I think my body somehow knew that the extra protein could cause trouble for her. At 18 months, she still doesn't like meat... though she loves fatty cheese, and will eat butter by the fistful.

Quote:
I am trying to figure out my protein balance and trying to find healthy sources of fat that arent dairy and are lower protein (my daughter and I are dairy intolerant at the moment), any suggestions?

congrats on your wee one on the way
Thank you. Here are some non-dairy sources of fat:

Most recommended:

egg yolks (you can use the whites in baking)
fatty cuts of meat
beef tallow or lard -- the best all-purpose cooking fat; it's worth rendering your own, if you can't find an additive-free brand

Less highly recommended, but very good as a supplement to the above:

nuts with a high proportion of fat, such as walnut, pecan, or macadamia
mayonnaise made with decent quality vegetable oils
olive oil

Many people also use coconut oil and other coconut products, though I'm not sure where they rank on Dr. K's scale of "biological value."

You might also look into Barry Groves. He promotes a similar type of diet, but with 60% fat rather than ~80%. His recommendations are close to the "modified Optimal Diet" that I'm doing at the moment, with its more generous allowance of protein and carbohydrates. The Groves plan is relatively easy to follow in everyday life, when eating out, etc. The Optimal Diet is more extreme, though it seems to be well worth it for those with serious health concerns. Maybe for everyone else, too, but it's hard to say with the current state of the research.

This is Barry Groves' web site: http://www.second-opinions.co.uk/
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Old 04-20-2009, 10:45 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Just got back from a prenatal visit, and my blood pressure is indeed starting to creep up again. : I wasn't really surprised, as I haven't been feeling great today. We're having an early heat wave, which always hits me hard... so I've been eating less carefully than usual, and I was likely dehydrated as well. (I get dehydrated very easily on plain water, and I didn't have any electrolyte drinks in the car.)

I'm thinking that maybe I should try to follow Dr. K's advice a bit more strictly, especially with respect to protein, to give my kidneys as much of a break as possible. His recommendations for pregnancy would keep me at the lower end of Dr. Brewer's range of 80-100 grams. I've been aiming for closer to 100 up to now, sometimes going a bit over. So I'm going to try to cut back slightly in terms of quantity, but try to do better at getting an optimal balance of amino acids.

With this in mind, I stopped by my favorite specialty grocery store on the way home, and got an awesome selection of organ meats: kidneys, sweetbreads, tripe, lamb's tongues, and pig skin. I also got some hazelnuts in the shell, which I'll be soaking and drying for snacks. And then there's bone broth, raw egg yolks, raw cheese, and the grass-fed liver and spleen we have in the freezer... those are some fine quality proteins.

The only trouble is, in this weather, I have no desire to cook. I guess I could just throw all the organ meats in the blender, bake them in a loaf pan with some bacon on top, and call it "Kwasniewski mystery meatloaf."
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