Any good tips for preparing Spaghetti Squash? - Mothering Forums
Traditional Foods > Any good tips for preparing Spaghetti Squash?
raksmama's Avatar raksmama 10:57 AM 05-05-2011

Any good tips for preparing Spaghetti Squash?

One of the foods my family loves is pasta and we have not been able to give it up. I tried buckwheat soba pasta but everyone hated it! I resigned to serving regular organic wheat pasta around once a week. The thing is one you get used to eating TF you really feel it when you don’t!  We all feel awful from eating Pasta last night so I am determined to find  a decent substitute.

 

I saw recipes for Spaghetti squash in Nourishing Traditions. Before I have another cooking disaster I thought I would ask in this forum first. Thanks!



laohaire's Avatar laohaire 11:15 AM 05-05-2011

I love spaghetti squash and look forward to the season. I cut in half lengthwise and bake cut side down in the oven (350F, until you can fairly easily push a knife through the skin), then scrape out the spaghettis with a big spoon. I like to toss with olive oil, balsamic vinegar, feta cheese, olives, fresh basil, diced raw tomatoes and other in-season vegetables. Yum!


raksmama's Avatar raksmama 11:46 AM 05-05-2011

Do you take out the seeds before you bake or after?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by laohaire View Post

I love spaghetti squash and look forward to the season. I cut in half lengthwise and bake cut side down in the oven (350F, until you can fairly easily push a knife through the skin), then scrape out the spaghettis with a big spoon. I like to toss with olive oil, balsamic vinegar, feta cheese, olives, fresh basil, diced raw tomatoes and other in-season vegetables. Yum!



 


laohaire's Avatar laohaire 12:14 PM 05-05-2011

Sorry, I forgot to mention that. It's been a while since I've had it (it's a mid-summer to early-fall dish for me). Yes, I take the seeds out before baking. I bake on a casserole dish. Of course you can also roast the seeds, but separate them first (cookie sheet, add a little oil and salt). Baking time varies depending on squash size, but give it a test poke every 10 minutes after about 30 minutes.

 

When it's ready, I turn the halves over face up on the casserole dish for a few minutes to cool slightly, so I can handle them. Then I take a metal spoon and scrape out the squash meat, and it just comes apart into little spaghetti-like strings into the bowl.


rhianna813's Avatar rhianna813 01:45 PM 05-05-2011

We've also switched from pasta to spaghetti squash ( in the fall, winter) and zuchini (summer) if we get gigantic ones in the garden.

 

Definitely let the squash cool a bit before attempting to scrape it. The steam is yikes! You get SO much squash from these things, it's amazing. We always have leftovers and store it in a glass mason jar in the fridge. It's lasted easily a week or so before we had spaghetti again.

 

I've also done a layered lasagna like dish with this squash. Turned out pretty good.

 

Rhianna


raksmama's Avatar raksmama 05:30 PM 05-06-2011



just curious, do you make pasta from zuchini too?

Quote:
Originally Posted by rhianna813 View Post

We've also switched from pasta to spaghetti squash ( in the fall, winter) and zuchini (summer) if we get gigantic ones in the garden.

 

 

 

Rhianna



 


Materfamilias's Avatar Materfamilias 07:45 PM 05-06-2011
NettleTea's Avatar NettleTea 09:29 PM 05-06-2011

Bake it, slice it open, remove seeds, pour in olive oil, add salt, spices and parmesan cheese. Delicious!


cocobean's Avatar cocobean 10:31 AM 05-09-2011

Another substitute that we like is quiona noodles.  They have only a slightly different texture than white flour noodles and they have tons of protein(for pasta) in them.  I've served it to many unknowing picky eaters and they never knew the difference. 

 


raksmama's Avatar raksmama 03:05 PM 05-09-2011



A good friend livng in San Fransisco gets those too but I have had no luck finding them here in Ottawa

Quote:
Originally Posted by cocobean View Post

Another substitute that we like is quiona noodles.  They have only a slightly different texture than white flour noodles and they have tons of protein(for pasta) in them.  I've served it to many unknowing picky eaters and they never knew the difference. 

 



 


wendyland's Avatar wendyland 01:17 PM 05-10-2011

I usually just use it with a marinara or meat sauce. 

 

I made it with lentils and breadcrumbs and some seasoning before.  I can't remember where I saw the recipe.  You can scrape out the "noodles" after cooking.  Put it in a casserole dish, mixed with breadcrumbs, s&p, lentils, parmasean cheese, onions(optional) and bake until slightly brown on top. 


Bellabaz's Avatar Bellabaz 01:37 PM 05-10-2011

Its great with some butter or olive oil and garlic. Also good with pesto.


raksmama's Avatar raksmama 06:55 AM 05-11-2011

Yumm I can't wait to try!   Spaghetti squash is not in the stores yet here. I guess they are more of a summer-fall vegetable.


TonyaW's Avatar TonyaW 09:07 AM 05-11-2011

Two great options are shredded zucchini and brown rice pasta. If you only eat it once a week, the brown rice pasta is fine unless it makes you feel bad. It tastes like homemade pasta. eat.gif


raksmama's Avatar raksmama 10:30 AM 05-12-2011


 

TonyaW, you are the second poster to mention  Zucchini.

Would you mind posting the recipe?

Thanks!

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyaW View Post

Two great options are shredded zucchini and brown rice pasta. If you only eat it once a week, the brown rice pasta is fine unless it makes you feel bad. It tastes like homemade pasta. eat.gif



 


cristeen's Avatar cristeen 04:48 PM 05-12-2011
Quote:
Originally Posted by jalilah View Post

Yumm I can't wait to try!   Spaghetti squash is not in the stores yet here. I guess they are more of a summer-fall vegetable.


Its a winter squash, but not everybody carries it. I can get it @ the farmers mkt in the fall when its fresh, but the few grocery stores that carry it do so year round because it stores well.
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