Could someone answer some fairly general/newbie questions for me? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 5 Old 05-06-2011, 10:49 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I was having trouble with my gums starting to receed and my bite changing pretty substantially. I'm also dealing with scoliosis and tmj problems that seems to be getting a bit more noticeable lately. I'm a male around mid 20s and just found out about weston A price through a book about healing tooth decay. It got me curious about organic foods (is this what traditional foods is referring to?). I feel lost in this whole thing, I went out to buy milk from organic pastures and notice the milk has some solid white stuff floating in it, some time before the expiration date I think there was more of the solid white stuff and it already started to smell kind of sour... I poured it away because I wasn't sure if it was alright to drink anymore. I also went out to buy organic gee to cook eggs with in the morning, the eggs are the regular ones (not advertised as organic or anything), and got some coconut oil. I didn't put it in the fridge and it got really hot one day, the oil turned liquid and when it went back to solid there were some black spots that formed near the bottom of the bottle... I think it might have been mold =/

 

I'm lost... those of you that eat organic/traditional foods, do you actually notice a change in your health, like a really big dramatic change, after making the move from eating "normal foods" to organic/traditional foods? Also, isn't it pretty expensive? Do you eat exclusively organic foods only? I don't cook, not really at least (I can make eggs... and instant noodles) and I don't want to be eating salads most of the time, atleast that's what I'm thinking now. My diet right now mainly consists of meat and grain (white rice), there's little vegetables. I did just buy a blender though to make smoothies, I'm hoping this will help... hope I can get some responses from you guys here... =/

 

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#2 of 5 Old 05-07-2011, 11:03 PM
 
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It got me curious about organic foods (is this what traditional foods is referring to?).
Organic food means food that is produced without inorganic chemicals (carbon based molecules that are components of life are organic, whereas other chemicals are inorganic. simplified.) It means only products derived from natural things can be used as fertilizer, pesticides, etc. It also in the US means that the crop cannot be genetically modified. It reduces harmful chemicals in your food and pollution from them of the earth and seas, but doesn't mean it's healthy. You can get organic junk food that isn't good for you. Traditional foods is refering to certain types of food and methods of preparing such foods, that have been eaten and provided good health to people for a very long period of time (hundreds or thousands of years)

I feel lost in this whole thing, I went out to buy milk from organic pastures and notice the milk has some solid white stuff floating in it, some time before the expiration date I think there was more of the solid white stuff and it already started to smell kind of sour... I poured it away because I wasn't sure if it was alright to drink anymore.

Organic Pastures milk is both raw, and unhomogenized. The solid white stuff is the cream from the milk. You can drink raw milk even when it begins to sour, though the taste might not be as good (it's great for baked goods instead of buttermilk). Try bringing it home in a cooler, and making sure your fridge is cold enough. Shake it up before drinking to mix the cream back in.

I also went out to buy organic gee to cook eggs with in the morning, the eggs are the regular ones (not advertised as organic or anything), and got some coconut oil. I didn't put it in the fridge and it got really hot one day, the oil turned liquid and when it went back to solid there were some black spots that formed near the bottom of the bottle... I think it might have been mold =/
At the least, you want to get organic eggs, as conventional eggs are horribly treated and not good for you. Organic eggs, the chickens aren't treated any better, but the organic feed does make a noticeable difference. The best is to get eggs from chickens which spend most of their days outside, eating bugs and weeds as well as chickenfeed, but you probably can't get them in a store. A farmer's market would be a good place to get them. the coconut oil is almost certainly not moldy. Mold forms on the top of foods, not deep under oil. I'm not sure what it is, but not mold. (and even a lot of mold, you can just scrape it off and eat the rest)


I'm lost... those of you that eat organic/traditional foods, do you actually notice a change in your health, like a really big dramatic change, after making the move from eating "normal foods" to organic/traditional foods?

Yes. A huge change. My cholesterol dropped back to healthy ranges, my weight dropped back to healthy ranges, my mental health issues (combined with several other lifechanges) are almost non-existant, I have more energy and just feel better.

Also, isn't it pretty expensive? Do you eat exclusively organic foods only? I don't cook, not really at least (I can make eggs... and instant noodles) and I don't want to be eating salads most of the time, atleast that's what I'm thinking now. My diet right now mainly consists of meat and grain (white rice), there's little vegetables. I did just buy a blender though to make smoothies, I'm hoping this will help...
Yes, and no. It is more expensive, however if you can't cook, then presumably you are eating a lot of processed foods and eating out a lot, in which case, it may not be that much more expensive. Cooking whole foods at home is always hugely less expensive than eating processed foods and eating out, but eating traditional foods is expensive. A lot more expensive. I could get a gallon of conventional milk for about 1.30. I pay 7.50 for half a gallon (which would be 14 dollars for a gallon) of raw, grass-fed, non-homogenized Guernsey whole milk, straight from the farmer. I could get a dozen conventional eggs for about 2.30. I pay 7-8 dollars a dozen pastured eggs from chickens who run around outside and eat bugs and weeds and veggie scraps as well as feed. I could get conventional ground beef for 50 cents a pound, but I pay 6 dollars a pound for ground beef that comes from cows eating grass, roaming outside with lots of free space their whole lives, which is healthier, more ethical, and more humane. That said, I'm not spending lots of money on soda, snacky puff things, cereal, etc, which don't make you feel full and aren't healthy.

I don't eat exclusively organic foods. I buy organic where it matters, and often buy "beyond organic" (that is, from farmers who pay attention not just to USDA organic standards, but their own personal higher standards), buying grass-fed or pastured animal products. I try to buy organic, or from farms which don't use chemical pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers, etc when I can. I always buy the "dirty dozen" (worst contaminated produce) and commonly genetically modified foods organic, but most others I buy conventional (with an emphasis on local and quality) because I can't afford it.

It sounds like you really need to start with just learning to cook. Eating even just a whole foods diet with a traditional foods emphasis, and learning to cook your food will help your health a lot, and then you can learn to make things like sauerkraut, and sourdough bread, but that's not where I'd start. I'd start by learning how to cook three healthy tasty meals a day, which are made fromfoods still in their original form or similar to it (like whole wheat flour, which is wheat which is just ground, fresh meats and veggies, rice, etc)

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#3 of 5 Old 05-08-2011, 09:15 AM
 
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If you like to read I would check out the book Real Food by Nina Planck.  Great information on real food newbies!  For me in the begining it was more exspensive to eat real foods but I think in the end it isn't.  Food cost around here has really gone up so I spend about the same amount as other non traditional eating people.  Really great job getting healthy fats in your diet.  That's a great place to start.  Also cutting out grains is another thing that will help you feel better and be less hungry.  For me when I completly cut out grains I feel less hungry and in turn eat less.  Just wanted to add to the information about eggs.  In my opinion organic/cage free eggs from the grocery are not worth the money.  I buy straight from a farmer in my area and pay $3 a dozen for pastured eggs!  Some other good resources would be www.eatwild.com, www.realmilk.com, www.marksdailyapple.com, and www.westonapricefoundation.com.  Goodluck!  I promise you won't ever be sorry you educated yourself about real nutrition, you'll feel better than you ever have before!


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#4 of 5 Old 05-08-2011, 01:35 PM
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The idea of traditional food is that most cultures at some point in time followed a diet that was nutrient-rich and healthy. With the development of methods of refining and processing crops, especially starches and sugars, a lack of understanding of why those traditional foods were important, and an abandonment of those traditional foods in favor of refined/processed foods, the general health of the people in the culture declined. There are many ways to put together a diet based on traditional foods principles. Most of us here in the US do a combination of nutrient-rich foods from a number of traditional cultures or try to make our American foods more nutrient-rich by soaking, sprouting, and growing in nutrient-rich soil.

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#5 of 5 Old 05-08-2011, 02:09 PM
 
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First I would learn how to cook.  I can give you hope in that department.  4 years ago I called my DH at work when I made a grilled cheese sandwich.  That is how pathetic I was in the kitchen!!!  A whole bunch of food intolerances and moving to a whole foods diet has taught me how to cook.  Start with something simple and follow recipes and you can move on from there.  I also would substitute whole grains for any "white" carb you eat.  Learn to cook brown rice instead of white.  Use whole wheat instead of white wheat.  There are simple recipes to use at first.  A grass fed roast in the crockpot with veggies.  :)  Yummm.......  Get a whole foods cookbook and cook 3 meals a day as pp said.  The kitchen isn't scary:  I promise.  If I can cook anyone can.  If you are better than baking then are some really fun ways to bake and still be traditional. 

 

What are Traditional Foods?

To me it is looking at how food used to be eaten.  Grains used to be soaked.  Corn wasn't eaten without processing.  Fermented food was common, etc.  People get caught up on organic.  My MIL keeps on handing me organic junk food with wheat.  Her argument is "but it's organic."  Yes, it's organic but it's also sugar and wheat filled and ultra processed and consequently devoid of nutrients.  TF is about food as food was meant to be grown and eaten to best satisfy the needs of our body.

 

Do we eat everything organic?

No.  If what I eat is local I skip organic.  I know the local farmers around here and trust the food.  For non local food I follow the Environmental Working Groups "dirty dozen."  If it isn't in the dirty dozen than I don't buy organic.  The exception is anything possibly GMO which I do buy organic.  Meat I buy local. Meat is important to get properly raised and fed.  Grass fed beef, etc. 

 

Is it expensive?

It depends on your viewpoint.  It is cheaper than eating out by far but much more expensive than SAD.  We have food intolerances to deal with which ups the cost drastically so I can't speak for you lucky people who can eat dairy, gluten, and whatnot.  You can cut down cost by buying bulk and local. 

 

Is there a health difference?

Oh yes.  Definitely without a doubt. Your body needs nutrients and whole food.  You will be amazed at how different you feel.  The funny thing is that after you are on a whole foods diet you can feel the affects of SAD food when you eat them.  Then you can be sure what they were doing to your body. 

 

Black spots in coconut oil

I don't refrigerate mine and deal with liquid oil if it gets above 75 or so.  Besides:  when I bake I always melt it first anyway.  The black spots sounds like something was in the oil either from you or the manufacturer.  I'd just work around it.  :) 

 

Good luck and happy cooking!


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