Bone broth makers - do you eat the bones? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 21 Old 07-19-2011, 06:53 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I have this feeling I may have posted this question here before, but if so, I've forgotten...

 

I make bone broth every week. I LOVE how the bones become soft and crushable after simmering for 12 hours in a slow cooker w/a dash of vinegar. I'm just wondering if any of you crush the bones and throw 'em in the soups, or do you throw the bones away? Do you crack the bones and suck out the marrow? Or do you do something else with them? And do you do it with all bones, like fish, pork, beef, chicken, or just some bones? 

 

I want to know.

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#2 of 21 Old 07-20-2011, 02:07 PM
 
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I don't eat mine. In fact the crumbly texture after a day or so of simmering grosses me out. However, if there is visible bone marrow I will dig it out and mix it into the broth. I don't usually bother cracking bones to get at hidden marrow though. I'm lazy. wink1.gif


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#3 of 21 Old 07-20-2011, 10:54 PM
 
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I love the cartilage and ooky stuff in broth and the marrow is my favorite.  Yum!  When I was eating bread I would mix marrow with sea salt and slather it all over a slice of bread.  So good.

 

When my bones get super soft I like to dehydrate them in my oven and grind them up with my mortar and pestle.  I can get it very fine, like flour.  I'll add this bone powder to all sorts of things: pancakes, smoothies, soups, etc.  It still tastes a little broth-y so sometimes I'll use it to boost flavor in my soups.  I've been wanting to experiment with using the bone powder as a flour substitute in some recipes.  I remember reading a book that had a recipe for bone meal cookies.  Anyways, we like our bones over here!


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#4 of 21 Old 08-01-2011, 12:02 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ursusarctos View Post

I don't eat mine. In fact the crumbly texture after a day or so of simmering grosses me out. However, if there is visible bone marrow I will dig it out and mix it into the broth. I don't usually bother cracking bones to get at hidden marrow though. I'm lazy. wink1.gif


Same here - I've tried eating the bones, but the texture puts me off too much.

 

We feed the bones to the dogs and cats.

 


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#5 of 21 Old 08-02-2011, 01:33 PM
 
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Same here - I've tried eating the bones, but the texture puts me off too much.

 

We feed the bones to the dogs and cats.

 


Chickens love them, too!  I just found that out yesterday.  I had made broth from pig trotters and didn't want to deal with the bones.  There was still a lot of tissue on the bones so I threw them to the chickens.  They went after the bones like crazy, I was shocked.  But, hey, cheaper than oysters shells.

 


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#6 of 21 Old 11-14-2011, 11:46 PM
 
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What does the bone marrow look like?

Is it brown?

What does it taste like?

 

Many thanks,

Blessings!

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#7 of 21 Old 11-15-2011, 10:23 AM
 
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I feed mine to the chickens.

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#8 of 21 Old 11-29-2011, 05:44 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Lazurii View Post

I love the cartilage and ooky stuff in broth and the marrow is my favorite.  Yum!  When I was eating bread I would mix marrow with sea salt and slather it all over a slice of bread.  So good.

 

When my bones get super soft I like to dehydrate them in my oven and grind them up with my mortar and pestle.  I can get it very fine, like flour.  I'll add this bone powder to all sorts of things: pancakes, smoothies, soups, etc.  It still tastes a little broth-y so sometimes I'll use it to boost flavor in my soups.  I've been wanting to experiment with using the bone powder as a flour substitute in some recipes.  I remember reading a book that had a recipe for bone meal cookies.  Anyways, we like our bones over here!


We are the same way here: cook the bones into a reduction after baking in a roasting pan. We keep chicken, turkey, lamb and beef bone soup separate. We freeze a lot of bone stock to use as a soup base. Marrow is rich in fat-soluble vitamins (and of course Calcium) We like the flavor.  

I don't know if many know this, but 4H Auctions are great places to obtain properly fed meat animals. They are raised in really nice conditions, kept on a healthy (not grain intensive) diet, are not crowded into a pen and confined or stressed. When sold the money helps 4-H kids save for College. This past year we purchased 2 lambs and a pig: the meat is delicious, and the animals in excellent health. We process them ourselves and everything gets used. Having a freezer (not the frost-free kind) helps a lot.

If the bones get soft enough to eat, I consume them with the meal. 

 

As for fish bones, DH makes fishbone stock for his mother after he goes spearfishing. This is completely different than a meat stock. The bones are 'roasted' and then cooked with water and vegetables. Simmered for about 4-6 hours. We pour the soup through a Chinoise (or cheesecloth) and freeze it for DH's mom who has Osteoporosis. {she had malnutrition as a child, hospitalized twice} I think her early diet deficiencies are causing her to have more problems at a fairly young age (71). My mom is 85 and has always tested negative for Osteoporosis...she's pretty active and amazingly healthy.

Fish bones can have a strong odor while cooking. If you add parsley or a few potatoes to the stock, it can really help mellow out the flavor/fragrance. Stay away from oily fish for soups. Those fish are better consumed after smoking them.

 

Oh, the question about what bone marrow looks and tastes like: when raw, marrow is white or creamy-white. When the bones are roasted or cooked in soup, the marrow seems to dissolve into the broth. If it doesn't, it can be spooned out of the bone cavity and eaten. It is very bland, with a creamy texture. When the bones are from a cut of roasted meat, the marrow can be golden brown where the heat and air contact it. Digging deeper, it is creamy white.

Just this past month I read a restaurant review of a place that features roasted marrow bones with vegetables (which are cooked separately) as an entree. It seemed funny to me that it was treated as a 'new' culinary phenomenon. Serving it with toast is traditional.

 

Some butchers will saw larger bones lengthwise for you: if you wish to serve the marrow in the bone, place it in the roasting pan in such a way that it won't melt and spill out of the bones. Foil can help avoid this. It is pretty rich tasting, and the flavor benefits by pairing with Sitka or Chantrelle mushrooms. Follow with salad :)

 

I am happy to hear about the chickens enjoying bone fragments; they need Calcium, too!

Fun thread.

 

I have a question for you, Lazurii; Do you refrigerate the bone powder? I like the idea of putting it in soups! Good one!

 

for gcgirl:

Fish per se don't have 'marrow'. Even large fish like 400# seabass don't have marrow in the bones. Most fish bones are either solid and very dense, or they can be partially (or completely) made of cartilage. The cartilage becomes very watery and delicate when the whole fish is baked, including the spinal column. It is possible to focus on fish like Bat Rays and cook the fins for the Calcium. The body doesn't have any significant meat, but the wings become tender after simmering a while. Cut the wings up, as the skin is tough and you won't get a good extraction of nutrients unless the inner meat is exposed to the broth. As with any fish take, consult your Fish and Game recommendations for consumption by pregnant and nursing women. Some fish can harbor significant amounts of undesirable compounds, and the DFG Annual Guide will inform how often it is okay to eat those kinds of fish. (They will mention which amounts are safe as well.) In the tropics, be aware of Ciguatera. (sorry got off topic.)

 

 

 

 

 

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#9 of 21 Old 12-01-2011, 09:46 AM
 
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So when you all are talking about the bones becoming an edible food.... mine never get soft, per se. I sometimes use vinegar and that doesn't change the end result for me at all. The crumbly thing I get, but only on the rough ends, and only after 3 + days of simmering.  Could you all give more detail about the textural change in the bones that makes it usable (without breaking a household appliance)?


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#10 of 21 Old 12-01-2011, 12:10 PM
 
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Originally Posted by LCBMAX View Post

So when you all are talking about the bones becoming an edible food.... mine never get soft, per se. I sometimes use vinegar and that doesn't change the end result for me at all. The crumbly thing I get, but only on the rough ends, and only after 3 + days of simmering.  Could you all give more detail about the textural change in the bones that makes it usable (without breaking a household appliance)?



I've found that standard grocery store bones get soft enough to easily crumble with my fingers within 12-18 hours, but that bones from our home-grown animals (we raise goats and chickens) don't. So, if you're using bones from high quality meat, maybe you won't get the same soft bones.


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#11 of 21 Old 12-03-2011, 02:04 PM
 
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Ocean Swimmer, I don't refrigerate the bone powder.  My logic is you can keep dried gelatin and jerky in the pantry, so how is this really different? 

 

No all of my bones become soft enough to grind into powder, it's usually the ends of the bones or the more honeycomb type bones.  The dense, solid bone that surround marrow usually doesn't get soft enough for me.


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#12 of 21 Old 12-04-2011, 12:08 PM
 
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Ha! And here I was simmering those grass fed high quality marrow bones for days and wondering what I was doing wrong. Thanks y'all!


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#13 of 21 Old 12-06-2011, 06:21 PM
 
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Originally Posted by LCBMAX View Post

Ha! And here I was simmering those grass fed high quality marrow bones for days and wondering what I was doing wrong. Thanks y'all!



OMG... ME, TOO!!!  I had no clue that bones got soft and crumbly!  LOL!


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#14 of 21 Old 12-11-2011, 06:00 AM
 
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With beef bones, how long till you actually decided to crumble them? I have used grass fed beef bones for 3 batches and each time it gels up great. So I guess it could be used again or I could stop and grind them up as they are pretty soft already?
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Originally Posted by ocelotmom View Post


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Same here - I've tried eating the bones, but the texture puts me off too much.

 

We feed the bones to the dogs and cats.

 


I just want to warn you not to feed cooked chicken bones to animals because they splinter and can puncture the esophagus or other parts of the digestive tract and be very dangerous. My dog got a splinter lodged in her throat once and almost died. She had an abscess the size of a baseball.

 

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#16 of 21 Old 12-11-2011, 06:31 AM
 
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These bones are super crumbly. I wouldn't dare give a regular roast chicken bone to my dog, but after a 24-48 hour simmer, these are falling apart.

Oh and Silversparrow, I hope you dog is ok now! My parents dog died from a brittle dog bone.
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#17 of 21 Old 12-11-2011, 11:05 AM
 
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Well, that happened over 10 years ago now. She's dead, but not from the bone. (She was 19 and very sick)
 

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These bones are super crumbly. I wouldn't dare give a regular roast chicken bone to my dog, but after a 24-48 hour simmer, these are falling apart.
Oh and Silversparrow, I hope you dog is ok now! My parents dog died from a brittle dog bone.


 

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#18 of 21 Old 12-11-2011, 01:02 PM
 
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With beef bones, how long till you actually decided to crumble them? I have used grass fed beef bones for 3 batches and each time it gels up great. So I guess it could be used again or I could stop and grind them up as they are pretty soft already?


I had 10 lbs of fresh grassfed beef bones, a good mix of marrow and femur ends.  I got about 30 quarts out of those bones of stock that gelled.  I pressure canned it and put it in my pantry.  Even after canning it still gels.


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#19 of 21 Old 12-12-2011, 10:44 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Koalamom View Post

These bones are super crumbly. I wouldn't dare give a regular roast chicken bone to my dog, but after a 24-48 hour simmer, these are falling apart.
Oh and Silversparrow, I hope you dog is ok now! My parents dog died from a brittle dog bone.

Yes. We feed bones to our dogs when they're soft enough to crumble with just our fingers, and we don't feed the bits that don't crumble without splintering.

 


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#20 of 21 Old 12-12-2011, 02:09 PM
 
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My parents dog died from a brittle dog bone.
I hope you guys know that this is a typo; I didn't mean that my parents feed their dogs other dogs.
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#21 of 21 Old 07-23-2014, 08:56 AM
 
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Rotissiere chicken bones (even organic) cook soft

Rotissiere chickens will have lots of finger smushable bones after 24 hours, including the ends of the biggest bones. 48 hours would be better still if you break some of the ends off and return them to pot.
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