Bone Broth color, what should it look like? Is it creamy/beige color? - Mothering Forums
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Traditional Foods > Bone Broth color, what should it look like? Is it creamy/beige color?
countryangels's Avatar countryangels 01:40 PM 11-15-2011

What color should my bone broth look like?

 

How much water do you place into the pot for a small chicken?

 

Do you keep adding water, until the bone marrow dissolves? How long should that take?

 

Is it ok to let it boil?

 

After its completely done, do you strain it?

 

Does it taste like chicken soup or stronger than that?

 

Many thanks,

Blessings!thumb.gif



Bantams's Avatar Bantams 06:15 PM 11-16-2011

Chicken stock is usually quite pale in color, unless you roast the bones first (and then it will be a rich golden brown).  Chicken broth will be just a little richer in color than stock.

I was taught to use 8# of bones per 4-5 quarts water.  If you are using meat as well (a whole chicken) you can use a lot more water.  I would use 6-8 qts for a chicken.  It just depends on how flavorful you want the stock.

Chicken bones don't really have much marrow - after all, bird bones are mostly hollow.  But mammal bones will have marrow.  I think the normal 12 simmering time for beef stock would be enough to extract marrow.  I would simmer chicken stock for 4 hours.  At that point, most of the flavor and nutrients will have come out, and longer cooking will only dull the flavor.

It's best to keep stock at a gentle simmer - vigorous boiling will emulsify the impurities into the stock, making it cloudy. 

Yes, you will want to strain the stock when it's done.

 


kwiathellen's Avatar kwiathellen 10:37 PM 11-17-2011

Is chicken stock the same thing as chicken bone broth?


Bantams's Avatar Bantams 10:27 AM 11-18-2011

Technically, "stock" is made from bones (chicken, beef, veal, etc) while "broth" is made from meat and bones, so it's much richer.  Many chefs will even use stock as the base liquid (vs water) when making broth. 

I have to say, not many would care if you used the words interchangeably.  Probably only the chef instructors at a culinary school...


Chicky2's Avatar Chicky2 11:36 AM 11-18-2011

I probably make more stock than anyone I know.  We butcher our own animals so I have a huge amount of bones at any given time.  Almost every week I have at least 3 full stock pots (30-60 quart pots, depending on the size of the bones) of stock going.

 

I always simmer for a few hours (completely cover bones in water and don't forget your whey or vinegar), skimming the junk off the top, and then remove bones and clean off the meat for later use.  Then put the bones back into the pot and let simmer the rest of the day.  Then I'll put the pot on the back porch if it's cold enough out or let it cool and put in the extra fridge.  Next morning I skim the fat off the stock and strain it.  Then back onto the stove it goes (unless it's not gelled, in which case I'd keep the bones in after getting the fat off and then simmer another 12 hrs or so) to simmer down to a couple of inches in the pot.  Then I either can that or pour it into ice cube trays and freeze. Pop into a bag later.  If you skim it well, and don't boil, but simmer, your stock should be clear.

 

HTH!  FTR, I do chicken, guinea, feral pig, beef, goat, duck, lamb, and domestic rabbi stocks.  And deer if I get the chance!


kwiathellen's Avatar kwiathellen 03:33 PM 11-18-2011

I always use chicken bones from roasted chicken legs. There always are pieces of meat still attached to the bones when I put them in the slow cooker. So is it necessary to simmer chicken bones  with vinegar for 12 hours to get the nutrients out or can I just do it for 4hours like Bantams said?


philomom's Avatar philomom 05:28 PM 11-18-2011
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwiathellen View Post

I always use chicken bones from roasted chicken legs. There always are pieces of meat still attached to the bones when I put them in the slow cooker. So is it necessary to simmer chicken bones  with vinegar for 12 hours to get the nutrients out or can I just do it for 4hours like Bantams said?

I get good results from letting mine simmer in the crockpot from nine a.m. to nine p.m....... I break the bones some with a kitchen hammer. I add whatever veggie scraps I might have on hand in with the leftover bones from a couple of meals.The stuff always gels well when cooled.
Thyme Mama's Avatar Thyme Mama 06:17 PM 11-18-2011

I make two gallons or so of chicken bone broth every week. I buy chickens from a local family who raises them on pasture. I usually roast my chicken, strip it, and then save the bones and cartilage in the freezer or start the soaking right away. I soak my bones in a pot full of water and a 1/4 cup of whey overnight. In the morning I start my pot. I get it to a rolling boil, skim it and then reduce heat to a gentle simmer all day. I skim throughout the day, if necessary. Before I go to bed I take the pot off of the heat and depending on how it looks, I either strain and cool it or just stick the pot in the fridge to cool and I simmer again the next day.

 

My bone broth is usually a golden-milky color. It is opaque and gelled completely. If I use non-pastured chicken I notice that my broth doesn't gel as much. Also, IMO, bone broth has a different aroma and taste than regular broth. It's hard to describe, but it does smell and taste different to me. But I do have a very sensitive palate and sense of smell.

 

If I don't use it sooner, my bone broth will stay fresh in the fridge for up to four weeks.


cyclamen's Avatar cyclamen 09:03 PM 11-18-2011

The milkiness, I have been told, is a result of emulsified fat.


pookahjade's Avatar pookahjade 10:30 PM 11-18-2011

Quick (possibly silly) question: why would you add vinegar to the chicken/bones when making stock? I have never heard of this before.


philomom's Avatar philomom 10:33 PM 11-18-2011
Quote:
Originally Posted by pookahjade View Post

Quick (possibly silly) question: why would you add vinegar to the chicken/bones when making stock? I have never heard of this before.

The vinegar is helping to leach minerals out of the bones... that "goodness" is then available for your body when you eat it. At least, that's how I understand it. I use lemon juice. My kids don't like that hint of vinegar.
pookahjade's Avatar pookahjade 10:52 PM 11-18-2011


Quote:
Originally Posted by philomom View Post


The vinegar is helping to leach minerals out of the bones... that "goodness" is then available for your body when you eat it. At least, that's how I understand it. I use lemon juice. My kids don't like that hint of vinegar.


So would any acid do the same?


DoubleDouble's Avatar DoubleDouble 05:27 AM 11-19-2011

I think so. Tomato paste would do the same.


Blessed_Mom's Avatar Blessed_Mom 11:28 PM 11-22-2011

Is there anyplace I can purchase bone broth from? I live around Seattle. I don't eat that much chicken and would like some bone broth from chicken or turkey......

 

 


Chicky2's Avatar Chicky2 11:01 AM 11-23-2011

Do you have any neighbors or friends who would save a few bones for you?
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blessed_Mom View Post

Is there anyplace I can purchase bone broth from? I live around Seattle. I don't eat that much chicken and would like some bone broth from chicken or turkey......

 

 



 


Blessed_Mom's Avatar Blessed_Mom 12:03 PM 11-23-2011


Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicky2 View Post

Do you have any neighbors or friends who would save a few bones for you?
 



 



Err...we have never had *that* conversation yet...Lol.

 

Thing is...we don't really have friends or family here (at least with whom we are close)......

 

So - no stores sell bone broth is it? Why? It seems like a ripe business idea - no?


philomom's Avatar philomom 01:58 PM 11-23-2011
My New Season's sells frozen stock, not bone broth.
Blessed_Mom's Avatar Blessed_Mom 02:13 PM 11-23-2011


Quote:
Originally Posted by philomom View Post

My New Season's sells frozen stock, not bone broth.


How is that different from the regular stock so many stores sell? Wholefoods, Trader Joe's , even Safeway sells stock (maybe not frozen) but how is it different? TIA


Thyme Mama's Avatar Thyme Mama 12:56 PM 11-24-2011

Bone broth is much more nutritious, it is gelatinous (it looks like jello when cold, it will melt to a liquid when heated) and has lots of available calcium and gelatin and protein. Stock or regular broth is a liquid, and while still good for, it has nowhere near all the nutrition bone broth has. I believe US Wellness Meats may stock bone broth now.


colsxjack's Avatar colsxjack 01:26 PM 11-27-2011

If you can't find bone broth, you may be able to find soup bones and make broth.

We sometimes buy beef or chicken bones. And we just bought a whole bunch of bones from a grass fed beef farmer.


CherryBomb's Avatar CherryBomb 07:23 PM 12-01-2011

Not sure what color it *should* look like, but mine is usually a golden yellow and cloudy.  I don't skim off the fat, but I do skim any "scum" (it's impurities rising, from what I understand?)  I just chuck a carcass into my big pot with some salt and raw apple cider vinegar. I bring it to a boil, skim off the scum, then reduce the heat and simmer.  I throw in some carrots, onions, and celery before I go to bed, and let it simmer for at least 24 hours total.  Then I strain it to get any chunks out out and divide it into ball freezer jars and freeze it.  I do mostly chicken, but also turkey, duck, beef, and pig bones.


GER611's Avatar GER611 09:49 AM 12-02-2011

I made bone broth for the very first time and cooked it for about 14 hours in a slow cooker. I added water a few times, but I never saw any 'scum' at the top of the broth. Why not? Did I do something wrong? The color it ended up being is a light yellowish color and it is not see through and a little thick. 


Chicky2's Avatar Chicky2 11:12 AM 12-02-2011


Quote:
Originally Posted by GER611 View Post

I made bone broth for the very first time and cooked it for about 14 hours in a slow cooker. I added water a few times, but I never saw any 'scum' at the top of the broth. Why not? Did I do something wrong? The color it ended up being is a light yellowish color and it is not see through and a little thick. 


It probably didn't boil.  I boil mine a bit first, and then let it simmer.  Boiling makes the scum come to the top.

 


GER611's Avatar GER611 11:56 AM 12-02-2011

So then there are probably no special benefits to the bone broth I made?  Thanks so much for the info. I started the broth in a dutch oven and after 4 hours, switched it to a crock pot. I saw it simmer, but not boil wildly. How long should I let it boil the next time? 


Chicky2's Avatar Chicky2 05:08 PM 12-03-2011

I"m sure there is still lots of goof stuff in there!  I just let mine come to a boil for, oh, maybe 5 minutes (gently boiling, not rolling) while I skim.


GER611's Avatar GER611 05:25 PM 12-04-2011

Oh good! Thank you. I froze 5 jars worth, so I'm glad to hear there are still benefits to it. I will make sure to watch it boil the next time. 


majoie's Avatar majoie 02:30 PM 12-05-2011

So what I've been calling stock (bones, skin, cartilege simmered for hours) that jells when it's cold is the same as what you call bone broth? I never thought of putting any acid in it. I guess that would help dissolve the minerals. Is it the dissolved minerals that sometimes makes it very whitish-opaque? I've sometimes had broth/stock not jell when I chilled it, simmered it more the next day (after it sat in the fridge over night with the bones and all in it) and it then turned whitish. I thought something was wrong with it and dumped it. It might have been more nutritious than what I usually make. Hmmm


Chicky2's Avatar Chicky2 10:38 AM 12-06-2011


Quote:
Originally Posted by MaJoie View Post

So what I've been calling stock (bones, skin, cartilege simmered for hours) that jells when it's cold is the same as what you call bone broth? I never thought of putting any acid in it. I guess that would help dissolve the minerals. Is it the dissolved minerals that sometimes makes it very whitish-opaque? I've sometimes had broth/stock not jell when I chilled it, simmered it more the next day (after it sat in the fridge over night with the bones and all in it) and it then turned whitish. I thought something was wrong with it and dumped it. It might have been more nutritious than what I usually make. Hmmm




Can't answer that question about the color, but that would have been perfectly good to keep!


t2009's Avatar t2009 08:10 PM 04-24-2012
I just made my first attempt at bone broth & base on the comments here I definitely got it wrong. It's cloudy & didn't gel at all after sitting in the fridge. It also didn't taste particularly great when I tried it. So what can or should I do with it? I'm assuming it's good for something & I'd hate to waste it after spending so long tending to it.

Also any ideas to trouble shoot for next time? I cooked it for one full day, refrigerated it over night & kept it going off & on the next day. It boiled for longer than it should have for a bit when DH was watching it. Also, the bones weren't particularly meaty & I added water quite a few times because it was reducing so much. Chicken broth I've got down, so I was disappointed that this came out so poorly.

TIA!
cristeen's Avatar cristeen 06:09 PM 04-25-2012

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by t2009 View Post

I just made my first attempt at bone broth & base on the comments here I definitely got it wrong. It's cloudy & didn't gel at all after sitting in the fridge. It also didn't taste particularly great when I tried it. So what can or should I do with it? I'm assuming it's good for something & I'd hate to waste it after spending so long tending to it.

Also any ideas to trouble shoot for next time? I cooked it for one full day, refrigerated it over night & kept it going off & on the next day. It boiled for longer than it should have for a bit when DH was watching it. Also, the bones weren't particularly meaty & I added water quite a few times because it was reducing so much. Chicken broth I've got down, so I was disappointed that this came out so poorly.

TIA!

 

 

Cloudiness is caused by boiling (not simmering).  That's appearance only.  Gelling is hit or miss, and dependent upon what you put in it - I have about a 50/50 chance of my chicken stock gelling, but nothing else tends to gel for me.  As to taste, IME, without a fair bit of salt, it tastes hideous.  It smells hideous too.  But if I put it in something and season it up, it's great. 

 

The bones don't need to be meaty, but you do need to have enough of them for the volume of water you put in.  And if it's evaporating too quickly, add a lid, and turn down your heat.  I don't refrigerate it overnight because it makes it too difficult to get the full 24 hours out of it, I just turn it down to the lowest setting and leave it overnight. 

 

As for color, if you start with raw bones or even bones that have only been cooked on the inside (like a chicken), then it's going to be light in color.  For a darker color, you need to roast your bones.  It does provide a deeper flavor also, but is not completely necessary. 


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