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#1 of 9 Old 02-28-2012, 05:08 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Hi,

wdyt, i am trying to eat local food, just started. i can get tons of winterveggies like beets and winter greens and cole - stuff like that, apples and pears but obviously nothing "really" fresh. do you think one needs to eat imported stuff in winter like bananas and oranges?

 

what do you think?


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#2 of 9 Old 02-28-2012, 06:16 AM
 
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Hmm, no, you don't "need" to eat imported anything, really. It was only very recently in our history that the average person COULD eat imported anything.

 

That said, eating local is not a blood oath. You are certainly free to take it as far (or not) as you like. I personally avail myself of citrus in the winter - which is not local for me but at least seasonal.

 

BTW "winter greens" are *really* fresh :)


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#3 of 9 Old 02-28-2012, 06:18 AM
 
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Another thought: next harvest you can preserve some food yourself for the winter. Drying or canning or even freezing your own food does result in a lot better quality than food preserved by commercial methods.


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#4 of 9 Old 02-28-2012, 07:55 AM
 
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besides what the other poster gave (and those were good) we grow sprouts and micro greens (they are nice and fresh) and with our full freezer we have no problem eating local and loving it eat.gif


 

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#5 of 9 Old 02-28-2012, 09:02 AM
 
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We are lucky to have year-round farmers markets where we can still get local produce, some of it fresh, some of it canned. Some area farmers grow things in hoop houses, so we get local items that aren't necessarily strictly seasonal.

 

And we do a lot of freezing and canning and drying in the summer, so we have local stuff all winter.

 

That said, we are not purists. I am local, but I like to drink tea and eat chocolate! And my DD is crazy about bananas and pineapple. We try to support our local farmers and supplement with a bit of imported produce.


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#6 of 9 Old 02-28-2012, 05:03 PM
 
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Not sure what you mean by "really" fresh - greens are definitely fresh. 

 

In a Russian winter, we survived with the only "fresh" produce being what was harvested before the snow and kept all winter - potatoes, cabbage, beets, carrots, green tomatoes (they strip all the fruit off the vines before the snow hits), onions, garlic.  Supplemented with whatever had been preserved during the summer - pickles, jams, krauts.  That's how people in cold areas have been doing it for centuries.  The only "really fresh" foods we got during the 8 mos of winter were the occasional bunch of radishes (with greens attached) from the market, and once we caught a street vendor with fresh oranges.  There wasn't anything else in the way of produce in a society where you are stuck eating what produce you can grow or barter with neighbors.  Once the growing season moved in, there were more options, of course, but it's a short growing season, and plenty needed to be preserved for winter. 

 

Around here, to the above I might add winter squash, broccoli, cauliflower, sweet potatoes and the occasional head of lettuce.  Parsnips, rutabagas/turnips if you like them. 

 

For fruit, it depends on where you live.  I can get both citrus and apples that are locally grown.  Sometimes asian pears and kiwi.  We don't get much in the way of pears.  But I also dehydrate fruit all summer long so that we have lots to choose from.  And I have a toddler who is addicted to bananas, so I'm not going to forgo those even though they're imported. 

 

You really have to choose for yourself what your comfort level is. 


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#7 of 9 Old 02-28-2012, 05:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Triniity View Post

Hi,

wdyt, i am trying to eat local food, just started. i can get tons of winterveggies like beets and winter greens and cole - stuff like that, apples and pears but obviously nothing "really" fresh. do you think one needs to eat imported stuff in winter like bananas and oranges?

 

what do you think?


Bananas and oranges?  No way is that necessary.  I hardly ever buy oranges.  I get bananas as a luxury item. 

 

We eat winter squash, sweet potatoes, greens, onions, carrots, apples, garlic.  Especially love sauerkraut for winter.  We indulge in a few other things for no good reason at all but none are necessary.  I think this is plenty of vegetables for a healthy diet throughout the winter and the live ferment is a big plus.  I think variety gets a little overrated and it unnecessarily fuels the food import business.  That was one of the things I changed my thinking about along with eating in a more primal style. 

 

I have one more butternut squash left from last year's garden.  The perfect winter keeper.  My dds will eat them for breakfast and dinner both on the same day and the next, too!     

 

 

 


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#8 of 9 Old 02-28-2012, 07:51 PM
 
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Oh, I know what you mean by "fresh!"  Once your body gets used to eating raw fresh lettuces and salad greens, you get a craving for them.  Something that winter squash, sauerkraut and potatoes just doesn't satisfy. 

 

I have started relying on bulk storage, including that of vegetables, for longer periods of time.  We eat the long keepers (i.e. carrots, winter squash, sweet potatoes, pickled jalapenos, canned tomatoes, etc.) rather than buying fresh veggies each week, mostly because we live far from a store, and seems silly to go shopping every week for food.  I went for a few weeks with nothing fresh, and then my sweetie brought back a package of romaine hearts home from work.  After everyone was asleep, I sat and ate two heads of lettuce with dressing - it was weird.  I couldn't stop.  It just tasted so good.

 

We grow sprouts too.  I think I need to do more of them - usually I try to save them for the kids, so I only get a few nibbles.  But I definitely crave fresh produce, even if it is not local, it is something I am hungry for.   

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#9 of 9 Old 02-29-2012, 08:14 AM
 
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I thought greens including lettuces were a winter vegetable?  Or maybe I'm spoiled because we have rather mild winters...  We are in the warm side of zone 6 and had a milder than usual winter this year.  The spinach and parsley are still perfectly green standing in my garden and weren't even covered.  I wish I'd had more of them planted! 

 

But even colder locations seem to have lettuce available locally from unheated greenhouse or just covered production--that's the norm here because our climate is variable and sometimes below zero for a while. 

 

I love that crazy-for-green feeling that makes Spring so welcome!  Body and spirit both want it.


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