NT September thread - Mothering Forums
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Traditional Foods > NT September thread
Brisen's Avatar Brisen 11:18 AM 09-01-2005
Here's a link to the last page of Aug's thread

And toraji asked a question at the end of it:

Quote:
Originally Posted by toraji
Hey, does anyone have any ideas for native nutrition classes for kids? I have an opportunity to teach a monthly class for children and am looking for fun ideas to get healthy eating across. They probably won't be SAD dieters, but the "alternative" mainstream types (shop at co-ops, eat organic generally, but no idea about NT and still eating packaged foods albeit organic ones).
And here's my question, for anyone who knows anything about bread.

Why is it that my soaked, freshly-ground, yeasted, long-risen, machine-kneaded bread barely rises and is dense and hard and sour, yet my soaked, freshly-ground, unyeasted, not risen, briefly hand-stirred NT pancakes are light and fluffy? Not that I'm complaining about the pancakes, I just don't know why the bread is so blah when the materials and methods are so similar. I thought that kneading helped the bread to stretch and capture air bubbles, yet the pancakes are fluffier. I have thought about abandoning yeasted, kneaded bread all together; my NT yeasted bread is usually very crumbly as well. My muffin bread and pancakes don't hold up as well as, say, store bought whole wheat bread, but they are at least better for sandwiches and sopping up gravy and beans than my pitiful bread. Sigh.

Hibou's Avatar Hibou 01:23 PM 09-02-2005
quick question: some of you have been making yogurt with raw milk, not heating it so much, right? (or am i just confused?) Where can I find a recipe? tia

toraji, what do you mean exactly by native nutrition? Eating only local foods? Using only native plants/foods?

Brisen, I have no idea why your yeasted bread won't rise. Is your yeast active? Can you post your recipe?
Brisen's Avatar Brisen 03:05 PM 09-02-2005
Hibou, I believe that the yogurt recipe in NT is either for raw milk or has a raw milk alternative. IIRC, you just have to heat it to about as warm as it needs to be for incubation. I mean, when you get right down to it with yogurt, you want to have as few bad germs in your milk as possible, and keep it at the temp that is too warm for the bad germs to do well, but warm enough for the good ones to thrive, right? You have to scald past. milk because it has been stripped of its protective properties and the bad germs can run rampant. So heat it to kill the germs, cool it enough that your good germs can live, and keep it warm while they multiply. The longer you let them multiply, the more of the milk will be soured.

I have directions for curds and whey in another book (a John Seymour book --The Self-Sufficient Life and How to Live It, I think) from raw milk. He says to just leave raw milk out in the summer, and it will curdle to curds and whey. I have made it, and my dairy farmer smelled it and said it is fine, but I haven't been brave enough to try it! This same book also recommended leaving your cream for butter out for 24 hours in a warm spot before churning for cultured butter.
Brisen's Avatar Brisen 03:05 PM 09-02-2005
Hibou, I pretty much follow the NT yeasted compromise bread recipe. I guess I'm not looking for advice so much as just complaining.
Hibou's Avatar Hibou 01:52 AM 09-03-2005
(all measures are approx! sorry, just the way I cook!)
1/2 pint kefir
1 egg
2 c. whole wheat flour, approx.

beat the egg into the kefir. Stir in about 1 c. flour, then slowly add more until it forms a ball. Knead in more flour to make a firm dough. Place in an oiled bowl for at least 8 hrs. Divide into 6. Roll out into rounds, with a little white flour to prevent sticking, as thin as possible. Fry in a large, lightly greased skillet for about 1 min on each side.

I made these last night and used them for chicken enchiladas, they were great. I started them early in the a.m., and rolled them out and cooked them just before dinner. I think I'd like to make a big batch to freeze though. It would be more convenient.
HerthElde's Avatar HerthElde 11:39 AM 09-03-2005
Brisen, is it possible that you overkneaded the bread? It's pretty easy to do so in a machine.
yitlan's Avatar yitlan 01:23 PM 09-03-2005
How do you prevent overkneading in a machine? Just curious, as I tried to make a sprouted flour bread in my machine for the first time last week!
Brisen's Avatar Brisen 03:34 PM 09-03-2005
Hmmm, overkneading.... I should try it by hand and see if it helps. I just hate icjky sticky dough on my hands :LOL
toraji's Avatar toraji 05:06 PM 09-03-2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hibou
toraji, what do you mean exactly by native nutrition? Eating only local foods? Using only native plants/foods?
Basically teaching ideas that are in line with NT but not necessarily exactly from the book. So a lot of WAPF groups take the name "native" or "traditional" nutrition, to be able to be more encompassing than just describing as NT. These are all ideas based on Dr. Price's work, of which there are many, many interpretations.

What I was looking for was how to introduce concepts of eating whole foods that are prepared properly, not just quick wheat breads. The problem is that these things usually take some advance preparation and it would only be like a 1-day class for maybe only a few hours. I could bring pre-made fermented dough, but then you miss out on the whole mixing and kneading part. Hmm...any ideas? Does not have to be only bread either. Maybe make your own salad dressing?

cobluegirl, I'll pm you with details about the class.
toraji's Avatar toraji 05:15 PM 09-03-2005
I have been really into this site lately. Gale Force, you'd probably like it a lot too. It is from a company that has been doing hair analysis for many many years, and this page has articles that talk about health issues related to mineral imbalances and toxic metal levels. Ex-veg people, check out the article about vegetarianism...it may explain the mood swings after switching diets.
http://www.arltma.com/Articles.htm
JaneS's Avatar JaneS 06:00 PM 09-03-2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hibou
quick question: some of you have been making yogurt with raw milk, not heating it so much, right? (or am i just confused?) Where can I find a recipe? tia
Yes, I follow the yogurt making instructions in NT to heat raw milk over a double boiler to 110. Actually I find it easier to heat slowly with the jar of milk submerged in water and a candy thermometer clipped to the side to monitor progress. I use my pasta/multi-pot, it has a strainer insert that I use to hold the jars.

With kefir though I'm not as exacting. I just want to bring the milk up to room temp, so I put the jar in a bowl and add some hot (not over 120) tap water and let sit for a bit, changing a few times.
JaneS's Avatar JaneS 06:12 PM 09-03-2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by toraji
Basically teaching ideas that are in line with NT but not necessarily exactly from the book. So a lot of WAPF groups take the name "native" or "traditional" nutrition, to be able to be more encompassing than just describing as NT. These are all ideas based on Dr. Price's work, of which there are many, many interpretations.
I would suggest ideas for healthier sandwiches, since they probably eat them everyday. New things to bring in a lunchbox, that kind of thing.

Not sure what they'd be... (a lot of help I am :LOL )

Maybe the importance of raw foods? That would be a relatively new concept.

Also soaking oatmeal. All sorts of fun additions to add to oatmeal, again something they can eat pretty frequently. People don't know that boxed cereal and granola is not healthy... everyone I say this to thinks I'm insane. "Whole grains" is such a magical advertising word. Then I start talking about the toxins from heat processing and then I really lose them.

Speaking of which, does anyone know what the chemical is that is produced by high heat... something that begins with an "a". I remember reading about it when I was pg and forgot. Something like acrylide?
memory maker's Avatar memory maker 09:41 PM 09-03-2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by toraji
I have been really into this site lately. Gale Force, you'd probably like it a lot too. It is from a company that has been doing hair analysis for many many years, and this page has articles that talk about health issues related to mineral imbalances and toxic metal levels. Ex-veg people, check out the article about vegetarianism...it may explain the mood swings after switching diets.
http://www.arltma.com/Articles.htm
thanks, I really had some problems with depression when I switched to a veggie diet. I feel so much better when I can have some meat.
memory maker's Avatar memory maker 10:54 PM 09-03-2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hibou
(all measures are approx! sorry, just the way I cook!)
1/2 pint kefir
1 egg
2 c. whole wheat flour, approx.

beat the egg into the kefir. Stir in about 1 c. flour, then slowly add more until it forms a ball. Knead in more flour to make a firm dough. Place in an oiled bowl for at least 8 hrs. Divide into 6. Roll out into rounds, with a little white flour to prevent sticking, as thin as possible. Fry in a large, lightly greased skillet for about 1 min on each side.

I made these last night and used them for chicken enchiladas, they were great. I started them early in the a.m., and rolled them out and cooked them just before dinner. I think I'd like to make a big batch to freeze though. It would be more convenient.

thanks I will have to try these. I have always wanted to make my own, but havent been brave enough to.
PrettyBird's Avatar PrettyBird 09:02 AM 09-04-2005
Hi everyone! I got NT from the library a couple weeks ago and I've started implementing a lot of the principles in our diet. I've switched to unhomogenized whole milk (I can't get raw unless I drive to PA and that's just unrealistic ), organic butter, I've been soaking nuts, beans, grains, and sprouting grains. I have always made my own stock, but now I am making it "properly" with the right cuts of meat.

Some of the NT recipes haven't turned out for me, notably the baked beans. I doubled the sauce and even after 7 hours in the oven they were still hard.

I was able to obtain some organic beef liver, but I can't say I like it very much. Blech. I still need to get some coconut oil, but it is SO expensive.
HerthElde's Avatar HerthElde 12:54 PM 09-04-2005
Hi PrettyBird,
I've made the beans once and they turned out for me - I did have to keep adding water (not sauce, just water) while they were cooking though, and it took a long time. I read recently that tomatoes don't allow beans to soften, so if you try it without the tomato stuff (can't remember exactly what's in it) and add that at the very end it might work. Also, some seaweeds are supposed to help soften beans (wakame maybe?), so if you add some while it's cooking that could help too.
Did you soak your liver in lemon all day before cooking it? Eat Fat Lose Fat has an awesome recipe for a liver stir-fry (with bacon) - it's soooooo good. I'll try to post the recipe later on.
An alternative they mention in Eat Fat Lose Fat is if you don't like liver, just take desiccated liver tablets.
PrettyBird's Avatar PrettyBird 02:31 PM 09-04-2005
Thanks! I am going to try the beans again, because I really did like the sauce. I did keep adding water, but I'm going to try soaking the beans longer and adding the tomato at the end like you said. I did try the Jamaican style beans and rice (with Pinto beans) though and it was such a hit I'm making it again tonight!

I'd love to try that liver/bacon stir fry..mmm! They even have nitrate-free bacon at my HFS.

Has anyone else noticed their skin looking better? Maybe it's the cod liver oil.
yitlan's Avatar yitlan 03:44 PM 09-04-2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by PrettyBird
Has anyone else noticed their skin looking better? Maybe it's the cod liver oil.
I have friends with dry skin whose skin has greatly improved with taking CLO. We live in the desert, so dry skin is common. I have acne prone skin and when I'm consistently taking CLO, it's much much better!
nini2033a's Avatar nini2033a 08:45 PM 09-04-2005
Actually I believe you might be talking about what I do. I use raw milk, and make Caspian Sea Yogurt. I add 1/4 cup yogurt into a mason jar of milk and leave it on the counter. With store bought milk it takes about 12 hours to culture(but is a thin drinkable yogurt), with Raw milk we had to experiment and discovered that it take 24 hours, then should be stirred then another 24 hours for a good thicker yogurt. I got my original culture from www.happyherbalist.com
Karen
memory maker's Avatar memory maker 12:29 AM 09-08-2005
I am wanting to start giving the kids fish oil, but dont know where to get it. I checked at our health food store, but they only had it for adults. Where online can I buy some at for kids?
yitlan's Avatar yitlan 01:01 AM 09-08-2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by memory maker
I am wanting to start giving the kids fish oil, but dont know where to get it. I checked at our health food store, but they only had it for adults. Where online can I buy some at for kids?
First, I love your username! When I became a mom, I felt like that was my new calling in life: to make memories for my kids. Anyway, I just give my kids the regular stuff. I know some people give theirs Carlson's flavored, but some people question the quality of Carlson's. We use Blue Ice CLO from http://www.greenpastures.org. When I first started taking it, I would get it out of the fridge and turn my back towards my kids (about three and one) like I didn't want them to see what I was eating. They begged for it then

Now they still act like it's a treat b/c they only get a small amount so they figure it must be good. Weird, I know!
Hibou's Avatar Hibou 02:32 PM 09-08-2005
fish oil: I have been taking the nordic naturals gels. I just bite a tiny hole in them and squeeze them into the kid's smoothies/kefir. Next time I will just buy it in liquid form. I think it is more economical that way. Is there a significant difference in CLO for kids and CLO for adults?

We've had some major progress with the baby's dairy sensitivity, so I just wanted to share! Last year at this time ds#2 was spitting up all the time and had constant eczema on his bum, despite being an EC baby. We quit dairy completely and adopted a traditional foods/NT diet. A few months ago, we started incorporating cultured goat's milk, then regular pasteurized goat's milk (i couldn't get raw) and then recently we were connected with someone selling raw cow's milk (thanks HerthElde!), so we tried it. Even in spite of indulging in soft ice cream over the long weekend : , ds's skin is doing great. It gets a little dry sometimes, but I can't even seem to link it directly to dairy in either of our diets anymore. I am hoping the continued use of fermented foods (he loves kimchi!), CLO, and other oils/fats in our diets will improve this over time. I really believe that if it weren't for our diet, both of us would still be having dairy issues- I am ever so thankful for having adopted this way of eating! I was just thinking about it this morning as I was kneading our bread, and putting nuts in the dehydrator- I am almost thankful that he had the problems with dairy because it really opened my eyes to so many things. It has also allowed me to have more control over what people feed my kids because I can use "allergies" as a reason for not eating numerous unhealthy things...so I think that he is *cured* will remain my family's little secret!

btw, I warmed my yogurt to 110, added the starter, and put it in the oven with the light on, wrapped in towels, for 8 hrs. It turned out great. I didn't stir it and continue because it seemed thick enough.
cobluegirl's Avatar cobluegirl 07:16 PM 09-08-2005
wow no wonder I haven't been getting any emails..I had forgotten to subscribe...duh....

As for oils for the kids...we give our kids the nordic naturals strawberry CLO. They love them. They are about the size of peas. I have wondered about the potency or benefit of them..but do notice a slight change in behavior when we run out. I was hoping for help with the dry skin & eczema but haven't really noticed it this time around...
mz_libbie22's Avatar mz_libbie22 02:44 AM 09-09-2005
I have a question for the ex-vegetarians. If you switched your kid's diet from veg to omni how did you get your kids to like meat? Or did they eat it like any other food and it wasn't an issue? My DS will only eat hotdogs, procuitto, and.....that's about it. Oh, he didn't mind finely chopped up beef liver in his rice either and he also eats dishes made with chicken broth. But he's not eating hardly any meat at all and he is a total carb-aholic. Besides cheese, all of his favorite foods are high in carbs/sugars (pasta, cold cereals, fruit-which he really tends to binge on, fruit juice, chocolate, crackers, chips, cookies,etc) He doesn't get these things very much at all now except for the fresh fruit and his cookie for dessert at preschool. But I feel like I've taken out all the processed carby stuff and now it's like there's no variety to our meals because we haven't replaced them with the high protein foods.

I made him some chicken nuggets from scratch and he ate the bread crumb coating and that's it! The bite he took of the chicken he spit out. I made him maple syrup breakfast sausages, and he spit them out. I made a meatloaf, and he spit it out (but he likes veg meatloaf). He obviously wouldn't touch something like roast beef with a ten foot pole if he can't even stomach chicken nuggets. I am out of ideas. The only thing I could do is to let him eat the processed meats, like the hotdogs and frozen fish sticks/chicken nuggets that don't resemble meat. But that kind of defeats the purpose of trying to eat healthier.
Brisen's Avatar Brisen 11:20 AM 09-09-2005
Hibou! Glad to hear your success story.

mz_libbie, I wonder if maybe you could try stuff that is more different rather than trying for things that are close to what you ate before? I'm thinking of for instance veg loaf and meat loaf -- maybe since he's expecting veg loaf, he dislikes the taste of meat loaf. My dh is like this -- I've tried adjusting his favourite dishes to be more NT, but it just irks him that they aren't what he expects. I generally have more success with finding great new recipes that become favourites.

Homemade beek jerky? Chicken wings (my kids love these)? Ribs? Omlette, scrambled eggs? You didn't mention eggs in your post (not that I'm assuming that you posted everything you ate, so maybe you do eat them). Eggs for us are a great, cheap way to get that protein. We often have eggs for breakfast, and as long as we don't have them *every day*, the kids don't get sick of them. Omlettes are super easy, and my kids enjoy them. Fried eggs, soft boiled, poached, egg banjos (fried egg sandwiches), scrambled eggs, egg salad, pancakes with double, triple, or quadruple the number of eggs called for. Or quick breads (like banana bread) with a lot of eggs added, then smothered in butter. My mil makes a yummy dish -- she sautees sliced cabbage in butter and pepper, then adds a couple of beaten eggs, they kind of coat the cabbage. Add eggs to your rice and beef liver. Your ds didn't like chicken nuggets; maybe he will like chicken liver nuggets, if he likes beef liver? My kids love these when I make them (and trust me, I'm not very good at it, they are pretty low-quality in terms of being like commercial chicken nuggets). If he likes carbs, one of those breakfast bakes where you fill a pan (like a cake pan) with stale bread, mix milk, eggs, and cheese, and pour it over and soak it, then bake? You can add meat, like cooked ground sausage, if you like. My mil makes something like this acutally as an appetizer, and cuts it into squares -- *divine*. But still quite starchy and cheesey tasting.

For fruit juice, can you start making some lacto-fermented beverages to replace the fruit juice?

I don't have my copy of NT on hand, but she has some sandwich recipes. Maybe the meat spreads would work, in leiu of processed meats?

Smoothies, with yogurt, and if you are comfortable, raw egg yolks?

My kids like hollandaise sauce for a dip, that has egg yolk and butter in it.

What about gravies/meat sauces? Mashed potatoes with beef gravy? We make fish sauce with frozen filets. OK, when I make it, I use canned mushroom soup, because then my dh will eat it , but here's the basic recipe. I use a can of cream of mushroom soup or cream of chicken soup (you can make a white sauce or whatever), some sour cream, butter, mayonnaise, and seasonings. I usually cook the fish first in the butter and then add the sauce stuff, but if you're making a white sauce you could make that in the pan first and then add the filets. (I use Alaskan pollock, just because they are cheap.) Cook until the fish is tender and fallen apart into little pieces. The fish I use I haven't found bones in, yet. We have it over mashed potatoes.

What about tuna, salmon salad? My kids are surprisingly fond of these, even my pickier eater. He eats the salmon salad (just a can of salmon -- I include the skin and bones -- and mayo) with grated cheese.

Can you replace the cold cereal with oatmeal, or another hot cereal? Will he eat the fried mush? That has eggs in it, plus the milk if you cook your oatmeal in milk.

Good luck!
Brisen's Avatar Brisen 02:02 PM 09-09-2005
I have a friend who is doing very well with NT. I asked her for some advice, and this is what she wrote to me. I thought I would pass it along, in case it helps anyone.

<< I am writing in the hope that you can help me out. I'm still struggling with implementing NT eating. I don't know how much you plan your meals, and if you do it on the computer, but if you do have anything like that -- files, plans that you have created -- would you mind sharing them with me? I feel somewhat overwhelmed thinking about what I need to do. I understand a lot of the concepts, but I tend to leave things until the last minute, and that doesn't work well with NT. Even if I do plan, I feel like once I miss doing one thing (I often fall asleep with the kids putting them to sleep, and usually plan to do soaking prep and that kind of thing in the eve after they are asleep) that it throws everything off. Do you have any suggestions, tips or anything that have helped you with implementing? I also have a hard time finding things that everyone likes to eat. And variety is a problem too. >>


Her response:
I had felt very much the same way. Dh and dd are picky eaters too and it is VERY hard to have variety according to what everyone will eat, but I don’t want to be cooking 2 meals everyday. I did that when I was vegetarian and it was A LOT more work. I have made a list of meals we like, I also decided what we needed to eat. I learned that there is more to NT and Dr. Price then just soaking your grains, eating organically and free range, etc. But for immunity and such, it really is important to concentrate on getting enough of the fat soluble activators. Each people that Price studied valued these and all ate them as much as possible for health. For us, I decided our main source would be from naturally raw yellow butter, cheese, egg yolks and then also adding liver as much as possible. A lot of people just supplement with high-vitamin cod liver oil, but I haven’t had a good experience with this. The kinds in the stores are just either too low quality that I question it’s purity and whether it’s rancid or not (cod liver can go bad VERY easily, it’s sensitive and if it does it can be toxic as Price mentions in his book, and the high-quality ones in the stores are distilled and are low-vitamin. The brand that Sally Fallon suggests is from the U.S.. I’ve seen it on a Canadian website before but it is far too expensive. So for us it’s yellow cheese and butter (raw), egg yolks and the addition of liver especially in the winter or if I haven’t been able to store enough yellow butter and cheese for the winter months. Since no one likes liver here, I pan fry it and then grate some with ground beef meals. I have also been adding liver to the stock pot lately and it’s been working out great, no one notices! We also have a lot of raw cream and milk. So for us, we’re concentrating mainly on high-quality, raw dairy, along with high quality eggs (the farmer’s are deep coloured, so that’s even better, I think A’s are too) and a little liver. Once I decided that, I also needed to decide a few other things. Such as the need for real stocks, they are incredibly nutrient dense containing trace minerals, as well as calcium, copper and magnesium and other things, the addition of the veggies and parsley add to it. So, I decided we would have many meals concentrating on the stocks. I thought of the meals we all like and wrote them down, such as different soups, stews, pot pies and other meals that are stock based. Since we’d be having a lot of stock-based meals and beef soup is a family favorite which we’d have atleast once or twice a week if I prepared it, then that meant it would be a good idea to have a pot roast once a week and I could use the leftovers in the soups. It is much less expensive than using stewing beef (which when I get meat from the farmer I need to choose whether I want all or part of the stewing beef to be that or ground beef or half and half, since it’s the same part of the cow used for both; I’d rather get more ground beef). So, I decided that. As for vegetables, I wanted to concentrate on the green (but I also use a lot of other veggies in cooking) for fresh, and the best and cheapest is lettuce, cucumber and that sort of thing. So, I thought we’ll need to include a salad somehow everyday. I normally don’t like eating salads with dinner so that left lunch. I did start having a salad for lunch everyday and added cheese and eggs, but it wasn’t enough, so now for lunch I’ll have salad or raw veggies with a sandwhich and ofcourse plenty of dairy foods (such as milk, yogurt and/or cheese). Now, my children won’t eat salad, but the only green veggie they’ll eat is cucumber but they tend to leave the skins, so I give them a chewable, kids green food supplement that I first found at [a local health store]. It’s really good. Anyway, I’m probably going into way too much detail, but I made decisions and then decided what my family would eat. I also made the rule that since I cook and do consider everyone’s likes and dislikes, everyone must eat what I make. I made this rule, because they are so picky that although they normally like something they don’t want to have it too close together, I’m talking about a week apart. I think that’s absolutely ridiculous, so I made that rule. So, I made a menu planning guide that I use. It doesn’t include snacks on it, but we tend to have NT cookies and nuts for snacks. I also notice that when eating the way I feel through the Spirit to eat, we tend to snack less, so that helps. This is a guide I use for my family, based on what I felt was healthiest and the best ways to get the nutrients we need that everyone will also eat. I’ll attach it to then e-mail. But it is a guide and is flexible if needed, especially during holidays. But we do still eat NT during holidays, but we’ll have a holiday meal depending on the holiday and more sweets (made NT style). Now when you look at it, it also doesn’t include drinks. We drink a lot of water (the farmer gives us free well water, which he tested and is just as pure as spring water and it tastes just like it too) as well as lacto-fermented beverages, and things like egg nogs and smoothies (but that’s more like food really). You’ll also look at it and it doesn’t appear that we concentrate on eggs since we only have it for breakfast a couple of times or so. But, I do. I add it to sandwhiches, salads and it’s also in our desserts, egg nog and smoothies, porridge/oatmeal, pancakes, etc. I have changed the recipes and made it to my specifications, so for pancakes for example, I will have 4 eggs and a couple of yolks in my recipe, which serves 4; Dh told me that it’s the best pancakes he’s ever had. It also doesn’t show how much yellow butter we eat. So, the guide doesn’t show all the details, but I use it for meal planning and it helps a lot. When I look at how I felt we should eat and felt satisfied that for us this is right, I noticed that it is pretty similar to how the Native Swiss ate. SO that makes me feel good, knowing that it’s been tried and true already. Now, I did notice that for me, if something came up and I didn’t do the stock or soak the porridge it ruined everything. I also noticed that I spent a lot of time in the kitchen everyday, cooking and also cleaning. So, I made a weekly schedule that works well for me. Once a week (for me, I chose Monday), we only do a very small amount of Homeschool and we spend the day doing food preparations. This is the day that I prepare as much as possible for the week’s meals and I also bake muffins and bread. Now, we really like fresh bread and dinner rolls straight from the oven, so for those two things I prepare the dough and let it rise a couple times, then only partially cook it (about 5 minutes, maybe 10) and then freeze. I partially cook it so that it the dough doesn’t get squished in the freezer, I’ve done it before where I froze it after the final rising, it works too. For muffins, I cook and then freeze. We’ll eat them defrosted or if we want warm muffins I’ll defrost them in the oven at 150F. I’ll also make the week’s cookies. If I need pie crusts or pizza crusts I prepare those too and freeze them. Doing the weekly cooking is a lot less difficult than once a month cooking, it really alleviates the work for the week and it means that we’ll be eating as we should all week and it can be routine. Now that was the key for me, to make it a routine. So, it really starts on Sunday night. I start soaking everything and start the stocks. And then I’m prepared to start preparing and cooking on Monday. I’ll also start the lacto-fermented beverages Monday. So, I just have a guide and this routine and it makes the week go more smoothly and I really enjoy eating A LOT more. Now, I had the same problem about forgetting to soak the rolled oats for porridge the next day. If you’re on e-mail a lot, then you can use Microsoft outlook to set up reminders. Just add soak oats to the calendar, you can repeat it every day, on chosen days every week and to repeat what you choose forever. Also, choose to be reminded of it. Then at the time you chose, if you have your e-mail open, a box will pop up making a short musical sound with that reminder and you’ll need to click on dismiss, so you’ll see it. Other tricks can be, putting up post it notes and such, remember you can start soaking the oats up to 24 hours in advance, if that’s easier. Oh, I’ve got to run. I hope this helps, let me know if you have any questions.
**********

She hasn't been able to send me the file with her plan yet, but if anyone is interested in it, let me know and I will send it out to you when I receive it. We live in a cooler climate (Ontario, Canada) and our summers are short (but hot ) so she has mostly based her meals on cold-weather foods. I would likely not buy lettuce in the winter (I like to buy local produce; she buys organic, and doesn't mind if it is from far away, just different philosophies) but I would grow sprouts, and I will look into having some kind of little hothouse set up for growing greens through the winter. If I can have houseplants, why not lettuce?

HTH
TopazBlueMama's Avatar TopazBlueMama 06:04 PM 09-09-2005
Thanks for posting that, Brisen! It was very helpful with many great ideas.
mz_libbie22's Avatar mz_libbie22 02:02 PM 09-10-2005
Thank you for the great ideas! I just made some pancakes and I added one extra egg and two yolks. They are SO yummy! So can you add extra eggs to just about anything you bake? I just bought some peach flavored Cod liver oil and I put it on DS's pancakes, is that okay to do?

Could you tell me how you make the chicken liver nuggets? Is it the same as how you'd make regular ones? Also, how exactly do you cook the fish? I've never cooked fish before : and I thought you had to bake white fish, but can you cook it on the stove?

Okay, sorry for all the questions!


I plan on trying the orangina recipe soon. I tried salmon salad but it didn't go over too well. Maybe I should try it with cheese though. I tried fried mush once but that didn't come out very good. But we do eat oatmeal here. I haven't bought a box of cold cereal in two months.
Brisen's Avatar Brisen 04:20 PM 09-11-2005
So, I bought some lard. It was just the cheap boxed stuff. I looked at the ingredients recently, and it says "Lard (may be hydrogenated)" followed by preservatives (bht, bha? a couple like that). : I can't escape!
Brisen's Avatar Brisen 04:22 PM 09-11-2005
I don't have my book on hand. Has anyone made sour cream? I can get organic, but not raw, sour cream at the grocery store, can I use that as a starter?
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