Kosher Cooking the NT Way. - Mothering Forums

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Old 06-07-2006, 03:10 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I'm trying to convert my diet to include more traditional foods and complete nutrients. NT is short for Nourishing Traditions, a cookbook/nutrition book by Sally Fallon of the Weston A. Price Foundation. She also co-wrote Eat Fat, Lose Fat (aka EFLF,) which I own. "NT" has become internet shorthand for the kind of traditional diet Sally Fallon writes about.

I'm also 100% committed to keeping Kosher, according to Orthodox Jewish law. It's quite a challenge to combine the two eating philosophies.

I'm well aware that, throughout history, Jewish people kept kosher AND ate according to traditional principles- since ALL people ate according to traditional principles before modern food processing came into existence. However, much of what I learned about keeping Kosher relies on modern food processing.

Kosher law states that milk must come from a Kosher animal to be considered Kosher. In times past, there was a requirement for a Jew to supervise the milk from the time of milking, through packaging, until it arrives at the Kosher household. In modern times, we're allowed to trust the USDA since USA law requires that anything labeled "milk" is cow's milk, and milk from any other mammal must be clearly labeled. Some Jews choose to keep "Chalav Yisrael" and have all milk supervised by a Jew as an extra stringency- but it's no longer required in the USA.


NT encourages the use of raw, not pasturized, dairy products. If I had my own cow or goat in my backyard, or purchased milk from a local Jewish farmer, there would be no Kashrut questions. However, the USDA isn't overseeing all the raw milk sales out there, especially in states where raw milk can only be sold as "pet food" or raw milk can only be consumed by the animal's owner. So I can't simply purchase kefir grains from a fellow MDC member if she used the grains in raw milk.

I also have some questions about liver. Kosher law states that liver must be from a Kosher animal or fowl that was slaughtered in a Kosher manner, and that liver must be broiled before using. It can then be cooked in other ways after broiling. This means that I can't eat raw liver or use any of the liver recipes in NT or EFLF. I also wonder how much of the nutritional qualities of liver are reduced by the Kashering methods- for example, should I eat liver more often to get its health benefits?

Ruth, single mommy to Leah, 19, Hannah, 18 (commuting to college), and Jack, 13(homeschooled)
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Old 06-07-2006, 03:40 PM
 
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I'm not going to be too much help here, but I did hear Sally Fallon say the reason there aren't pork recipes in NT is b/c Mary Enig is Jewish and it was out of deference to her. I wonder if you can find some contact info for her at the WAP website? She might have lots of answers for you.

Also, not everyone did everything the NT way, right? Some cultures had dairy, some didn't. Some probably ate a ton of organs, some not so much. Some mostly fish, some none. So if you can't do it ALL, you're still OK and will benefit. I'm curious to watch this thread. My daughter goes to a Jewish preschool and I know a bit more about kosher laws than I did before, but not enough to help you out!

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Old 06-27-2006, 12:43 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Could this get moved to the NT forum pretty please?

Ruth, single mommy to Leah, 19, Hannah, 18 (commuting to college), and Jack, 13(homeschooled)
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Old 06-28-2006, 02:45 PM
 
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one thing you might be able to do that would be helpful, would be trying to get ahold of a really old Jewish cookbook. It wouldn't help with sources for animal products, but it would definitely help with recipe ideas and preparations of kosher alternative dishes.
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Old 06-28-2006, 03:46 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruthla
I also have some questions about liver. Kosher law states that liver must be from a Kosher animal or fowl that was slaughtered in a Kosher manner, and that liver must be broiled before using. It can then be cooked in other ways after broiling. This means that I can't eat raw liver or use any of the liver recipes in NT or EFLF. I also wonder how much of the nutritional qualities of liver are reduced by the Kashering methods- for example, should I eat liver more often to get its health benefits?
I'm sure that you could adapt the pate recipe. (I know, I'm always mentioning pate ) I would broil the livers, cook the mushrooms & onions in schmultz, add the broiled liver, wine & seasonings & reduce. Then whir it up, add a little more schmultz for creaminess. Basically, I'm suggesting following the recipe with the exceptions of broiling the liver & using chicken fat in place of the butter. Coconut oil might also work. What do you think?

Sorry, very little advice on the milk. In states where raw milk is legal, I think that there is state testing to ensure quality. Would that qualify? The other option is to culture pasteurized, non-homogenized milk. Would using a yogurt culture from commercially available yogurt qualify?

Bummer about the kefir grains. Would using the powdered starter be kosher?
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Old 06-28-2006, 04:26 PM
 
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We've been using Straus milk for our kefir lately. It's pasteurized ... but it's mostly grass-fed, organic, non-homogenized, and makes very tasty kefir. http://www.strausmilk.com/
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