Raw goat milk Qs - Mothering Forums

 
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#1 of 17 Old 07-11-2006, 06:23 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I need help making a decision.

I asked a question last week about getting cream out of raw milk. Turns out goat milk is not so easy to seperate. Someone mentioned a cream seperator. What is this and how much does one cost?

My potential source mentioned that she freezes her milk so it is easier to get the cream out. Is this true?

I have to decide whether or not to buy a share. We do not drink or use straight milk for much. It is yogurt, sour cream, ice cream, cheese, and butter we use most. Can I make these things out of goat milk (not the butter)? I understand that goat yogurt will be runnier? That is OK. But if there is no easy and/or economical way to get the cream out, it does not make sense for us to buy a share. There are no local sources of raw cow milk or else that is the way I would go.

Help!
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#2 of 17 Old 07-11-2006, 08:10 PM
 
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Goat milk yogurt definitely works- I eat it for breakfast almost every day! Goat milk works great in baking, and I can't imagine why it wouldn't work in ice cream. I know I've seen goat milk butter in a store- I didn't buy it because it was expensive but I know it exists!

Here's a website I found with cheesemaking info- they use raw goats from their own dairy so they should be able to answer many of your questions.

Ruth, single mommy to 3 quasi-adults
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#3 of 17 Old 07-11-2006, 08:37 PM
 
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#4 of 17 Old 07-11-2006, 09:12 PM - Thread Starter
 
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$300!!!!!! YIKES!

OK, new topic......

Is there any way to seperate goat milk without one of these things?
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#5 of 17 Old 07-11-2006, 10:10 PM
 
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I can't find the article anymore, but I read about one lady who poured two gallons at a time in a basin and kept it in the fridge overnight. Then she carefully skimmed the very thin top layer...I think it took her about 5 gallons of milk to get a pint of cream which made 1 lb of butter. Only practical if you have lots of goats' milk, She had two milkers producing about a gallon per day.
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#6 of 17 Old 07-11-2006, 10:16 PM
 
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I googled "making goat butter" to find out how they were getting the cream and found this:

Quote:
Strain one gallon of fresh milk into a clean, shallow, large pan and allow the container to situncovered and undisturbed-in your refrigerator for 24 hours. The next day, take the pan from the fridge and-with a large spooncarefully skim off the cream that has risen to the top and store it in the refrigerator in a sterile, tightly covered jar. (The skim milk can be used in cooking, in cottage cheese, or as a tasty treat for your livestock.)

Note: So far, I've had no problem with "off flavors" in my milk or cream. As long as your utensils and refrigerator are reasonably clean, you shouldn't have any trouble either. Just don't store garlic or onions next to the milk.

Repeat the foregoing procedure on a daily basis until you've accumulated one pint of heavy cream in your jar. This should take about five days, if you skim a gallon of milk per day. (Naturally, if you use two gallons of milk and two large pans, you can cut this time in half.) When you've collected a pint of cream, you'll be ready to make butter.
(from Mother Earth News but no longer online, I used google's cache)
From UC Davis:

Quote:
Separation

Due to the smallness. of the fat globules, separation will normally be incomplete unless a cream separator is used. A cream separator, if available, will recover practically all the butterfat. If a separator is not available, the milk can be set in a shallow pan and brought to the scalding point by slow gentle heating. The milk is then set aside in a cool place, and in ten or twelve hours the cream may be removed in thick layer.
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#7 of 17 Old 07-12-2006, 12:53 AM
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Hello,

I posted in your other thread also. You can make terrific cheese, ice cream yogurt, etc. without having extra cream. Really, it can be done. You don't need to add goat cream to these things. If you want to make ice cream, what we do is add coconut milk to it in place of the cream, and it is really, really good. There are only a couple of cheese recipes that call for extra cream. You don't need to add extra cream to make cottage cheese or most other soft cheeses. The best goat cheese book I have found out there is Goats Produce Too by Mary Jane Toth. Our yogurt is not jelly like, but I don't think that is natural looking anyway. It is softer, but really good as a drink or in a smoothie. You would have to buy butter somewhere instead of making it. I don't know of many people who actually make goat butter though. We just buy cow butter and turn it into ghee so that all the milk protein is removed, since we don't tolerate cow milk protein. Also, yes the cream separators are exhorbitantly priced, which is why we don't have one at this point! Maybe if we win the lottery. Also, you have to get a good one in order for it to work well with goat milk, which will be more than 300 dollars most likely. Anyway, hope some of my rambling is helpful.
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#8 of 17 Old 07-12-2006, 12:53 AM
 
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Here's the mother earth news article

http://www.motherearthnews.com/libra...ut_a_Separator
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#9 of 17 Old 07-12-2006, 12:56 AM
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Oh and one more thing... you can make a perfect cream cheese substitute with whole goat milk (it talks about it in the cheese making book I mentioned). Also, draining the whey out of your yogurt will give you yogurt cheese, which is also really good. It can be used as a cream cheese substitute also. We don't use sour cream much, but I know alot of people that substitute yogurt for sour cream and don't seem to have much of a problem with it.
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#10 of 17 Old 07-12-2006, 10:29 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks!!!!

I am all over the goat book. Going to go look for it online now.

I am not trying to be so hung up on the cream. It is just that we are not yet eating meat and might not even get to the point. So many of the recipes that are meatless in the NT book call for cream or their sour cream-like recipes. Looks like I just need to experiment with yogurt and see what happens.

Thanks for all of your help!
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#11 of 17 Old 07-12-2006, 11:30 AM
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Will you eat eggs? I add raw egg yolks to our smoothies and sometimes even yogurt that will be consumed right away to up the vitamin/fat content. Of course, lots of people are squeamish about raw egg, so I don't know if that is something you would go for.
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#12 of 17 Old 07-12-2006, 02:04 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RAF
Will you eat eggs? I add raw egg yolks to our smoothies and sometimes even yogurt that will be consumed right away to up the vitamin/fat content. Of course, lots of people are squeamish about raw egg, so I don't know if that is something you would go for.
We do eat eggs on a very limited basis. But they REEK. The smell makes me pretty sick. If they taste anything like they smell when raw, I do not think I could stomach them.
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#13 of 17 Old 07-12-2006, 02:06 PM - Thread Starter
 
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On a related note.....

Is it OK to freeze raw milk? Our provider takes the milk directly from the pail to a freezer. I know the rule that once something is thawed you are not suppose to refreeze it. So canI still make ice cream and popsicles out of thawed goat milk? I hope so since dd is currently chewing on a goat milk-stawberry popsicle.
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#14 of 17 Old 07-12-2006, 06:14 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper
On a related note.....

Is it OK to freeze raw milk? Our provider takes the milk directly from the pail to a freezer. I know the rule that once something is thawed you are not suppose to refreeze it. So canI still make ice cream and popsicles out of thawed goat milk? I hope so since dd is currently chewing on a goat milk-stawberry popsicle.
I think the only reason you shouldn't refreeze it is that the texture suffers. If she liked the popsicle then I don't think you have a problem.

Ann
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#15 of 17 Old 07-13-2006, 07:01 PM
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Does he freeze it completely or just long enough to cool it down to an acceptable temp? I know that we stick our milk in the freezer right after straining so that it cools faster to avoid certain bacteria growing too quickly. We take it out and refrigerate it long before it freezes though. I don't think it would be a problem to make ice cream, etc. out of thawed milk, but like the pp said, it does make the texture funny.
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#16 of 17 Old 07-13-2006, 10:24 PM - Thread Starter
 
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They freeze it completely. I can request that it not be frozen but I will only be able to pick it up once a month so frozen is good for us.
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#17 of 17 Old 07-13-2006, 10:38 PM
 
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We froze our raw goat milk. It was really the only option for us, since we also had to drive far to get.
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