Anybody else totally freaked out by soy? - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 66 Old 10-04-2006, 10:28 PM - Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Kingston, NY
Posts: 932
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I get so : when I hear people proudly declaring that their kids drink soy, eat soy nuggets, soy this, soy that...it makes me nauseous. Do people really not know that it should be consumed in moderation, if at all? I'd be so nervous to feed a kiddo so much soy.
BetsyNY is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#2 of 66 Old 10-04-2006, 10:33 PM
 
MyLittleWonders's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Always learning something new.
Posts: 7,928
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Me too. That's a huge benefit to us (along with the msg and other crud in food) to making more and more from scratch ... no more soy anything. It is nearly impossible to get away from in terms of processed/prepared foods. We will have a small amount of miso when at the local Japanese restaurant, and use a small amount of soy sauce or tamari (sp?), but man, the thought of feeding my kids soy in pretty much any form makes me feel ill.

 Me + dh = heartbeat.gif ds (7/01), ds (11/03), ds (6/06)
and dd born 11/21/10 - our T21 SuperBaby ribbluyel.gif heartbeat.gif
MyLittleWonders is offline  
#3 of 66 Old 10-04-2006, 10:45 PM
 
Annikate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: FL
Posts: 4,777
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yes and I really wish I could get SIL to understand how awful it is. Her ds has all kinds of allergies but she won't consider taking him off of soy.
Annikate is offline  
#4 of 66 Old 10-04-2006, 11:28 PM
 
glycerin19's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 56
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Not to be naive, but what is the problem with soy products?
glycerin19 is offline  
#5 of 66 Old 10-04-2006, 11:46 PM
 
DevaMajka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Burnaby, BC
Posts: 10,344
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I am, a bit. I've stopped drinking dairy, so we do use soy milk, but mostly for the occasional bowl of cereal, and in my coffee (which is worse there- the soy or the coffee?? lol)
I do have a meal that I cook that is really yummy that has tofu in it, so I make that sometimes. I did read something about *fermented* soy being ok. It's just the unfermented that we have to watch out for. The tofu I use says "traditional" so I don't know if that means fermented or not. But I'd like to find a place to get fermented soy to use in that dish.
But I've vowed to not use soy as a substitute for anything, no tvp for ground beef, no "soy nuggets" for chicken nuggets.

Ds doesn't get much soy at all. He doesn't eat the tofu in that meal, just sticks with the veggies. And he doesn't drink the milk in his cereal. So just whatever soaks into the cereal he eats.

So basically yeah. It worries me. But then I realize that we drank pop daily for years (dp still drinks it) and that HAS to be WAYYYY worse than the amount of soy we consume!

Becky, partner to Teague, SAHM to Keagan (7yo), Jonah (2yo)
 

DevaMajka is offline  
#6 of 66 Old 10-04-2006, 11:55 PM
 
MotherWhimsey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 3,387
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
yeh, soy scares me, so we avoid it.
MotherWhimsey is offline  
#7 of 66 Old 10-05-2006, 12:00 AM - Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Kingston, NY
Posts: 932
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
BetsyNY is offline  
#8 of 66 Old 10-05-2006, 01:23 AM
 
mamabohl's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Newport News, VA, USA
Posts: 1,310
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Oh yeah, I avoid it as much as possible. Right now the only places we get it are soy sauce (which I probably cook with once a week at most), store bought bread and tortillas. I need to get some sprouted flour and try making my own tortillas...and I'm just not ready to make my own bread, lol.

Genie, mama to T (4/02), I (10/04) and T (7/09)
 
 
 

mamabohl is offline  
#9 of 66 Old 10-05-2006, 01:26 AM
 
Ruthla's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 43,652
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
I know that soy messes up my menstrual cycles, so I avoid it. I do buy tamari (naturally brewed soy sauce) and there's soy oil in the "non hydrogenated margarine" I buy for serving with meat meals, but that's the only soy we use on a regular basis. I don't object to the occasional (like a few times a year) consumption of "soy fake foods" as a special treat (how else can I get a kosher cheeseburger?)

Ruth, single mommy to Leah, 19, Hannah, 18 (commuting to college), and Jack, 13(homeschooled)
Ruthla is offline  
#10 of 66 Old 10-05-2006, 01:29 AM
 
christacular's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: the hills of the chankly bore
Posts: 396
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
nope.
http://www.foodrevolution.org/what_about_soy.htm
christacular is offline  
#11 of 66 Old 10-05-2006, 01:42 AM
 
caedmyn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 5,226
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by christacular View Post
Even if the negative hype about soy isn't accurate (and it can't all be wrong--if even 1/10th of the stuff in "The Whole Soy Story" is accurate soy is bad news), it's a processed food unless you're eating straight soybeans or making your own soy milk, tofu, etc (which I know some people do). Since one of the main points of a traditional diet is avoiding processed foods, that pretty much leaves out soy.
caedmyn is offline  
#12 of 66 Old 10-05-2006, 01:44 AM
 
christacular's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: the hills of the chankly bore
Posts: 396
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
it is actually very easy to make your own soy milk, tofu, tempeh or buy freshly made (where i live, anyway). natural foods stores carry miso and shoyu and frozen tempeh, asian markets often make their tofu on the premisis, soy milk making machines are relatively inexpensive and all it takes is a 1/4 cup of organic non-GMO dry soybeans to make 6 cups of fresh soy milk.

the point is to avoid overly processed foods, including soy foods. but that doesn't mean all soy should be tarred with the same brush. it is just a bean, after all.

don't believe the hype! (on either side of the issue).
christacular is offline  
#13 of 66 Old 10-05-2006, 01:53 AM
 
Gale Force's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Nestled in the Sierras
Posts: 4,950
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks for the link, christacular. I'm going to read it again when I'm not headed to bed. I don't know if all of the issues raised by WAPF about soy are true and I can see why some of it is just simply inflammatory (e.g., "Zinc deficiency can cause a 'spacey' feeling that some vegetarians may mistake for the 'high' of spiritual enlightenment.").

But I would like to see Robbins delve deeper into the soy-thyroid link. He suggests that in populations there isn't a problem with consumption, but my understanding is that people with hypothyroid are regularly advised to avoid it. That is, it IS a problem if you're hypo, it's more controversial if it's a problem otherwise.

I would also like to see him address the phytates issue in more detail. He acknowledges that phytates inhibit absorption (and that is a finding that has not been in dispute for decades) but says that people on a plant-based diet are no more likely to be deficient in zinc. The way I see it is that there are many paths to zinc deficiencies and the SAD is one of them, so to compare vegetarian populations to people on the SAD doesn't really tell us much. Human studies show that if you reduce the phytates to zero in your food, you will double your absorption of iron, zinc, and magnesium. We all eat only so much food in any one day. High phytate foods that are not prepared properly to reduce phytates should not be the mainstay of any diet. And that includes grains and nuts as well as legumes.

Amanda Rose, author, Rebuild From Depression: A Nutrient Guide. Don't miss this opportunity to build a business telling friends about probiotic foods and grass fed meats: Beyond Organic Review.

Gale Force is offline  
#14 of 66 Old 10-05-2006, 01:54 AM
 
christacular's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: the hills of the chankly bore
Posts: 396
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deva33mommy View Post
I am, a bit. I've stopped drinking dairy, so we do use soy milk, but mostly for the occasional bowl of cereal, and in my coffee (which is worse there- the soy or the coffee?? lol)
I do have a meal that I cook that is really yummy that has tofu in it, so I make that sometimes. I did read something about *fermented* soy being ok. It's just the unfermented that we have to watch out for. The tofu I use says "traditional" so I don't know if that means fermented or not. But I'd like to find a place to get fermented soy to use in that dish.
But I've vowed to not use soy as a substitute for anything, no tvp for ground beef, no "soy nuggets" for chicken nuggets.

Ds doesn't get much soy at all. He doesn't eat the tofu in that meal, just sticks with the veggies. And he doesn't drink the milk in his cereal. So just whatever soaks into the cereal he eats.

So basically yeah. It worries me. But then I realize that we drank pop daily for years (dp still drinks it) and that HAS to be WAYYYY worse than the amount of soy we consume!

tofu is not fermented, it is basically a "cheese" made from soy milk using a curdling agent. tempeh is fermented, as well as shoyu (tamari), and miso.

you are right in being wary of foods containing "isolated soy protein" or "soy protein isolate", "texturized vegetable protein" etc. many of these are also made with genetically modified non-organic soy beans. we don't know enough about the long-term effects of consuming large quantities of these types of foods to be sure of the health consequences, if any, they could have on us.
christacular is offline  
#15 of 66 Old 10-05-2006, 02:04 AM
 
christacular's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: the hills of the chankly bore
Posts: 396
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gale Force View Post
But I would like to see Robbins delve deeper into the soy-thyroid link. He suggests that in populations there isn't a problem with consumption, but my understanding is that people with hypothyroid are regularly advised to avoid it. That is, it IS a problem if you're hypo, it's more controversial if it's a problem otherwise.
from the mayo clinic website:
"No direct evidence suggests that people with underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism) should avoid soy foods or supplements. But it's possible that eating large amounts of soy could reduce your body's ability to absorb the synthetic thyroid hormone levothyroxine. Other foods and medications that may decrease absorption of this hormone include:

* A high-fiber diet
* Iron supplements
* Cholestyramine (Questran), a medication used to treat high blood cholesterol
* Aluminum hydroxide, an ingredient found in some antacids
* Sodium polystyrene sulfonate (Kayexalate), a medication used to treat high blood potassium
* Sucralfate (Carafate), a medication used to treat ulcers

If absorption of this hormone is reduced, signs and symptoms of underactive thyroid may persist despite usual doses of levothyroxine. Blood tests can detect this problem. If you take levothyroxine, talk to your doctor before starting any new diets, medications or supplements."


Quote:
I would also like to see him address the phytates issue in more detail. He acknowledges that phytates inhibit absorption (and that is a finding that has not been in dispute for decades) but says that people on a plant-based diet are no more likely to be deficient in zinc. The way I see it is that there are many paths to zinc deficiencies and the SAD is one of them, so to compare vegetarian populations to people on the SAD doesn't really tell us much. Human studies show that if you reduce the phytates to zero in your food, you will double your absorption of iron, zinc, and magnesium. We all eat only so much food in any one day. High phytate foods that are not prepared properly to reduce phytates should not be the mainstay of any diet. And that includes grains and nuts as well as legumes.
he does say that fermenting and cooking soy foods reduces the phytates. but i think his point all along was that we should not make any one food (high phytate or no) the mainstay of our diets. also, it is not just the consumption of phytates that impedes mineral absorption but a whole host of other factors in the diet, including inadequate consumption of vitamins from fresh food sources.
christacular is offline  
#16 of 66 Old 10-05-2006, 02:18 AM
 
Gale Force's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Nestled in the Sierras
Posts: 4,950
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by christacular View Post
he does say that fermenting and cooking soy foods reduces the phytates. but i think his point all along was that we should not make any one food (high phytate or no) the mainstay of our diets. also, it is not just the consumption of phytates that impedes mineral absorption but a whole host of other factors in the diet, including consumption of vitamins from fresh food sources.
There are many factors that affect mineral absorption. Phytates are one of those factors. If you are deficient in zinc or iron you would be wise to prepare your foods to reduce the levels of phytates. Most soy preparations don't do that. I don't think anyone argues that absorption of minerals all boils down to phytic acid.

If you had goiter, christacular, would you eat soy? It is a goitrogen.

You see, many of us found this way of eating here on the traditional foods forum because things we had eaten in the past have affected our health. I have low thyroid function, so I don't eat goitrogenic foods. When I've had mineral issues, I didn't eat a lot of high phytate foods without fermenting them. That just makes sense. And, in fact, I continue these practices so that I don't have to worry about my zinc levels int he future.

But to answer the OP, no, I wouldn't say I'm freaked out about soy, I just don't eat it.

Amanda Rose, author, Rebuild From Depression: A Nutrient Guide. Don't miss this opportunity to build a business telling friends about probiotic foods and grass fed meats: Beyond Organic Review.

Gale Force is offline  
#17 of 66 Old 10-05-2006, 02:38 AM
 
christacular's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: the hills of the chankly bore
Posts: 396
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
thyroid disfunction runs in my family. i am tested for it frequently and likely will develop issues at some point or another. while i believe that diet plays a much larger role in our overall health than we have been lead to believe over the last few decades i also think that genetics and other factors beyond our control play a role few people are willing to admit to.

if there is some issue with the goiter and you want to look at dietary causes, you are best to look at your iodine intake. studies show that you can safely eat the foods that may pose a risk to your healthy goiter safely if you up your intake of iodine rich foods like sea vegetables.

more information talking about the anti-soy movement and why it is flawed:

http://www.aviva.ca/article.asp?articleid=14
http://enzymeuniversity.com/artman/p...ticle_31.shtml
http://www.drweilselfhealing.com/pri...=272&iBDC=3264
http://youngagain.com/antisoyfraud.html
christacular is offline  
#18 of 66 Old 10-05-2006, 02:50 AM
 
runes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 4,933
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
traditional foods, ok. but whose traditions?

some of the arguments of nt are valid, however i do take issue with their problem with vegetarianism as well as it's apparent ethnocentrism. i'm 1/2 japanese and soy has been a part of my diet since i was little. no isolates or uber-processed soy. mostly fermented.

but then again, the japanese don't eat the quantities of soy the way that we do here in the us. their diet is mostly vegetables, fish, some meats that are used more for flavoring than as a main dish.

who's going to go to japan and start waving the evil soy flag? i double dog dare you .
runes is offline  
#19 of 66 Old 10-05-2006, 03:23 AM
 
christacular's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: the hills of the chankly bore
Posts: 396
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
the okinawans are considered to be the longest-lived, healthiest people on the planet and they consume on average 1 - 2 servings of soy (the minimally processed/fermented stuff) per day. also, a lot of seaweed (there's that iodine again!)
christacular is offline  
#20 of 66 Old 10-05-2006, 01:38 PM
 
aprilibarra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 512
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think kidspiration has an important point, that the Japanese do not rely on soy as a staple of their diet. We frequent a japanese market and there are more kinds of seafood than i've ever seen in my life and a utilization of fruits and vegetables. but in the US, we are so lazy that anything that doesn't take any time to prepare.
I was a vegetarian for several years and in all that was very depressed and anemic, periods were debilitating, and i believe that it contributed to my cervical cancer. Now i have terrible problems with hypoglycemia. the other stuff is undiagnosed so i'll leave at this. I ate a lot of vegetables as well, but tofu was my staple, primarily asian food, bc i worked at an authentic chinese restaurant for years.
aprilibarra is offline  
#21 of 66 Old 10-05-2006, 01:48 PM
 
hanno's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Lansing, MI
Posts: 3,490
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I just don't buy any of the 'soy is evil' stuff. I have been eating it regularly for decades and it has helped me be a much healthier person than I ever was eating SAD. I only buy/eat organic vegan food and have not been ill for more than a day in years (aside from pregnancy stuff). Now for all those nuggets and other process stuff, well it is junk food and junk food is just that, JUNK.
hanno is offline  
#22 of 66 Old 10-05-2006, 02:01 PM
 
Laurel723's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: In the bellybutton of the NW
Posts: 867
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruthla View Post
I don't object to the occasional (like a few times a year) consumption of "soy fake foods" as a special treat (how else can I get a kosher cheeseburger?)
I never thought about that-that would be a huge bummer!

I avoid soy as much as is humanly possible. The only places we get it is from store bought bread (just a little more than I can handle, making my own bread right now, even though I enjoy it!) and eating at MILs house because they use 'vegetable oil (read: soy) and margerine, and when I make cookies I use chocolate chips w/ soy lecithin in them because DH can't stand the taste of carob, and I just can't give up a good choc chip cookie at that time of the month, kwim?

I avoid that junk like the plague though...esp now that I'm pg and will be nursing soon. Little boys don't need any estrogen!
Laurel723 is offline  
#23 of 66 Old 10-05-2006, 02:59 PM
 
MerelyGod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 799
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm on the fence about soy. I don't think it's healthy, but I think it's probably OK in very small amounts. I guess I am not freaked out by it, but when I hear people touting the "health benefits" or that SIL gives my 14 month old niece cups of soymilk to drink, that does kind of freak me out.

We don't eat a lot of it, but we do occasionally use it in place of meat and dairy (which we don't eat at all). We put soy milk on our cereal and eat veggie burgers. I love tofu and soy sauce in my stir frys. But it is not a daily thing (or even weekly), and I don't let my 14 month old have it ever, although she is nursing, so I guess she kind of gets it anyway.

I view it as a processed "conveinence" food, and even though I know I shouldn't eat it, I do anyway because it tastes good.
MerelyGod is offline  
#24 of 66 Old 10-05-2006, 03:13 PM
 
Gale Force's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Nestled in the Sierras
Posts: 4,950
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidspiration View Post
traditional foods, ok. but whose traditions?
some of the arguments of nt are valid, however i do take issue with their problem with vegetarianism as well as it's apparent ethnocentrism. i'm 1/2 japanese and soy has been a part of my diet since i was little. no isolates or uber-processed soy. mostly fermented.
This issue gets discussed a good bit on this forum and most people here would probably agree.

On the thyroid issue, people definitely need to be concerned about iodine if they are hypo (or getting too much if hyper). But considering soy affects iodine, I would look at both.

But following the soy proponents "come on, it's just a bean" argument, given that it is a goitrogen, I have no reason to eat this particular bean. And it is lower in phytase than other beans (the enzyme that breaks down phytates), so again, I don't know why I would choose this bean when I have other beans to choose from.

The genetics argument gets discussed here and in the Vax and Health and Healing board and subforums. My son might point to me when he examines his own low thyroid function. He did inherit it from me because when I produced him, my thyroid was not producing at the levels it should have. My breastmilk did not contain the levels it could have. His case is not severe, thank goodness, but he is low. It's his inheritance but it didn't have to be. And in light of this, I wouldn't feed him goitrogens and I don't mean just soy. There are too many things that affect our thyroids and all of the other glands and organs in our bodies that we cannot control. This one I can control.

Amanda Rose, author, Rebuild From Depression: A Nutrient Guide. Don't miss this opportunity to build a business telling friends about probiotic foods and grass fed meats: Beyond Organic Review.

Gale Force is offline  
#25 of 66 Old 10-05-2006, 03:38 PM
 
Gale Force's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Nestled in the Sierras
Posts: 4,950
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
But this thread got me thinking why WAPF has a specific campaign against soy. Obviously, I've read the arguments and see that the WAPF leaders have specific reasons to be against soy, but I don't recall soy being an issue in Price's research. Does anyone remember if he anything to say about it? Of course, he didn't see the American over-consumption of soy and may have had a comment had he lived in a later generation, but he didn't.

Amanda Rose, author, Rebuild From Depression: A Nutrient Guide. Don't miss this opportunity to build a business telling friends about probiotic foods and grass fed meats: Beyond Organic Review.

Gale Force is offline  
#26 of 66 Old 10-05-2006, 03:44 PM
 
Attila the Honey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: swimming with sharks
Posts: 2,614
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Just to echo what has already been said, I am concerned with children (or anyone) eating large amounts of processed foods, not necessarily soy.

My dd eats edamame, soy sauce, tofu, miso but we avoid processed 'fake' foods and stick to organic non-GMO soy. I am mostly skeptical of the anti-soy hype but at the same time I think eating minimally processed foods (soy or not) is the most beneficial for our health.

flowersforyou.gif

Attila the Honey is offline  
#27 of 66 Old 10-05-2006, 03:48 PM
 
trmpetplaya's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 3,757
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We eat the occasional tempeh with dinner (it's so yummy!) and use tamari for stir-frys (works better than sea salt in stir fry, IME), but the use of non-fermented soy all the time every day does kinda freak me out... And my mom knows someone who stopped breastfeeding because her baby had allergies and instead of trying to eliminate whatever it was from the mom's diet they put the baby on a soy formula : Poor baby girl

love and peace.

mama to two girls and due in November!
: Circumcision can never be undone :
trmpetplaya is offline  
#28 of 66 Old 10-05-2006, 03:57 PM
 
Sharondio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 582
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm not soy-phobic. I use tamari and eat edemame. I consider tofu to be pretty worthless from a foodie standpoint, my adherence to traditional foods only adds to my not liking it.

Can I just say that I'm *grateful* that I eat traditional foods and don't need to rely on soy as a protein convenience food.
Sharondio is offline  
#29 of 66 Old 10-05-2006, 05:34 PM
 
MCsMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: WA
Posts: 1,185
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I would consider myself against processed food in general, and 'fake' soy processed food even more. I do not think that soy in and of itself is bad, but I do have issues with people who want to eat 'healthy' and are eating lots of processed soy 'health' foods all the time. As if to say that a soy burger is better for you then a pastured, organic beef hamburger, simply because one is meat and one is not, kwim? And everything in moderation, except processed junk food, no one really needs that IMO.

Go Green I don't vax either, why mess with perfect?
MCsMom is offline  
#30 of 66 Old 10-07-2006, 10:50 PM
 
Chicharronita's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: In the Candyland of my Imagination
Posts: 1,560
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
All through the 90s I was so into eating fake soy meats, soy milk and eating a low-fat diet. I ate some boneless, skinless chicken, and small amounts of red meat occasionally, but I was drawn to vegetarianism (however, my ex at the time was the cook, so I'd eat what he made for dinner. I would never make the meat myself because it grossed me out). I thought I was being so virtuous, and what did I get in return? Severe PMS and menstrual cramping, endometriosis, uterine fibroid, ovarian cyst, weight gain, severe sugar cravings and hypoglycemia. I didn't make the connection to the soy, figuring that since I was Asian, it should be fine for me.

In 2002, when I was pregnant I stumbled on Dr. Brewster's diet for preventing pre-eclampsia (blueribbonbaby.org). He recommended drinking a quart a day of milk, which up to then I had been avoiding (regular P & H milk gives me constipation). However, I got a hold of the Organic Pastures raw milk, and started drinking it, quite reluctantly I might add. Was I ever surprised that I felt fine on it.

From there I found the Weston Price Foundation information, and that sure was an eye-opener! I was pissed at all the vegetarian information that I had been believing up to then. I started to slowly eat more meat, and eliminated all soy from my diet except small amounts of miso and soy sauce. I no longer had any cramping, and felt more energetic, but something was still a problem.

After sitting on the fence for two years, and developing high blood pressure, I went on the Atkins diet last December. Once I eliminated grains and sugar, and started eating more vegetables, I lost a ton of weight, and all my other symptoms disappeared. Lately, I've even been able to eat small amounts of sprouted wheat bread! But I have no PMS, no sugar cravings, I even don't crave chocolate! This last is a miracle to me. I hardly ever get that feeling I used to get, of wanting to eat something but not knowing what it was....a maddening feeling that I used to fill with eating chocolate, or drinking more coffee.

Sorry to go on and on, but I want to shout this information from the rooftops. People wonder why we Weston Price fanatics are so anti-veg. Well, it's because quite a few of us have been damaged by the pro-soy, anti-meat propaganda, and it'll be a while before we're not pissed anymore, LOL.


Quote:
Originally Posted by aprilibarra View Post
I think kidspiration has an important point, that the Japanese do not rely on soy as a staple of their diet. We frequent a japanese market and there are more kinds of seafood than i've ever seen in my life and a utilization of fruits and vegetables. but in the US, we are so lazy that anything that doesn't take any time to prepare.
I was a vegetarian for several years and in all that was very depressed and anemic, periods were debilitating, and i believe that it contributed to my cervical cancer. Now i have terrible problems with hypoglycemia. the other stuff is undiagnosed so i'll leave at this. I ate a lot of vegetables as well, but tofu was my staple, primarily asian food, bc i worked at an authentic chinese restaurant for years.

Chicharronita is offline  
Reply

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off