Have you all seen this innovation in bread making??!! - Page 5 - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
Old 01-07-2007, 03:10 AM
 
dvons's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Seattle
Posts: 821
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have always used "white" whole wheat flour that I grind at home for my WW loaves and it does get a little of the spongeyness that PPs are talking about. I've got some red wheat berries now though so I was going to try those next since they are supposed to have more natural gluten. I've never not eaten the loaves, they are always tasty they just don't rise as well as any of the loaves I've made with 100% AP flour.
dvons is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 01-07-2007, 04:04 AM
 
jordmoder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: the wild west
Posts: 451
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
ok, so I want to use my crockpot insert - fine - but what do you use for the lid ??? Mine is glass with this plasticy looking knob ... will it melt ???

thanks
jordmoder is offline  
Old 01-08-2007, 04:06 PM
 
estuary's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Lower Putah Creek Watershed
Posts: 115
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Tamogotchi, thanks!

It turned out that my yeast was way expired (I'd kept it around for jump starting ginger ale for which it worked fine, but it was from 2004 and I didn't want to trust dinner to 3 year old yeast). so I've postponed my breadbaking til next weekend. I'll try it in the cast iron pan - from the pictures I've seen of others' loaves it seems like it would work , but I didn't want to ruin a dinner based on my assumption. i think I'll try it more as an experiment...

thanks again!
estuary is offline  
Old 01-08-2007, 04:44 PM
 
Hibou's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: a little house on the prairie
Posts: 1,372
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I tried mixing a double recipe with my kitchenaid mixer a couple days ago. then I just left it in the bowl to rise. when I went to turn it out the next day, there was all this chunky unmixed flour at the bottom! I was so mad! (it was the first time I'd mixed bread with my mixer, and I was really unimpressed with it.:


Quote:
Originally Posted by estuary View Post
Tamogotchi, thanks!

It turned out that my yeast was way expired (I'd kept it around for jump starting ginger ale for which it worked fine, but it was from 2004 and I didn't want to trust dinner to 3 year old yeast).
I always buy the big bulk packages of yeast and then store it in the freezer. It lasts forever that way.
Hibou is offline  
Old 01-08-2007, 04:45 PM
 
Hibou's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: a little house on the prairie
Posts: 1,372
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by jordmoder View Post
ok, so I want to use my crockpot insert - fine - but what do you use for the lid ???

thanks
Do you have an oven-safe plate that you could cover it with?
Hibou is offline  
Old 01-16-2007, 04:55 PM
 
estuary's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Lower Putah Creek Watershed
Posts: 115
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I can't believe how fast posts get swamped here! I guess this'll serve as a bit of a 'bump' though!

This weekend I made this bread and it received a lot of praise from the rest of the family.

My first loaf was 2/3 whole wheat and 1/3 white - just 'cause I wanted to get them used to the idea of this bread...

Yesterday I baked a 100% whole wheat version (with a little added rosemary) and if it hadn't overshot its oven-entry time by about 45 minutes, it would have risen just as high. As it was it was only minimally shorter and slightly less circular (my poor aim into the pot is to blame for that).

I used a dutch oven that's approximately 2-3 quarts in volume and it worked just perfectly. I found the original instructions' cooking time to be a bit lengthy and only did the last bit of baking (lid off) for about 10 minutes with no problems.

This is great! It just requires knowing that I'll be home the next day at the right time.

Now I'm off to scan these many pages for the different variations that were mentioned (and to look at all the new breadmaking posts that were started over the weekend). Hurray!

Thanks for all the advice, it worked out just fine!

(if there's a way to post photos, I'll put a picture of my first loaf here...)
estuary is offline  
Old 02-13-2007, 04:04 PM
 
ConsCathMamma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 258
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have made this recipe several times, and it is always a hit. However, I always make a huge mess with all the flour on my towels trynig to let it rise but reduce the amount sticking to the towel--then the dough would be all kinds of ugly getting it into the pot and flour is EVERYWHERE.

I am physically somewhat of a klutz; so, kudos to those of you who aren't as messy as myself in the kitchen!

Today, I just couldn't deal with the mess, and while I try to avoid plastic wrap and use little of it as a rule, it made this SO much easier. I just lined these pasta bowls (we no longer use for pasta) with plastic, sprinkled a little flour, put the dough. The shallow bowl was a perfect size to contain the rising loaf in the shape to go in my pot. It all went in without a hitch--none of it stuck to the plastic wrap.

Anyway, I just thought I'd share this tip for those who shared my troubles!
ConsCathMamma is offline  
Old 02-13-2007, 04:26 PM - Thread Starter
 
yitlan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: NM
Posts: 1,988
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I actually stopped using any towel or parchment paper or anything. I just let it rise in the bowl and use a spoon to stir instead of my hands. It turns out great.

Also, I make a wetter dough and we have GREAT pizza dough!

Zia+Lane+Sonora=Mi Vida Loca! :
yitlan is offline  
Old 02-13-2007, 07:16 PM
 
estuary's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Lower Putah Creek Watershed
Posts: 115
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've been making this every weekend (100% whole wheat) and am in the still-mental-only stages of figuring out how to adapt to freshly ground flour AND sourdough (with a starter that is only hypothetical at this point, gee, do I live too much in my head, or what?)... oh, what was I saying, oh yes...

I use cotton napkins instead of towels - therby only needing a light sprinkling of flour because there aren't square acres of terry surface area...

but maybe I'm gonna try the 'covered with nothing' version....

cool!
estuary is offline  
Old 02-14-2007, 02:35 AM
 
Chicharronita's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: In the Candyland of my Imagination
Posts: 1,557
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
I love this recipe! I made it with all-white flour for my dh's family, and it was a hit. It makes a great gift. I try not to make it at home, since I try not to eat grains, but am not always successful avoiding them.

Chicharronita is offline  
Old 02-22-2007, 05:44 PM
 
msiddiqi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Queens, NY
Posts: 757
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I just tried this bread yesterday, and while it is fairly easy, I think maybe b/c I'm using ww flour the temperature settings might be a bit off. After half an hour the bread is really crispy on the outside but kinda soggy/uncooked inside. Anyone else have this problem?
msiddiqi is offline  
Old 02-23-2007, 01:38 AM
 
Chicharronita's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: In the Candyland of my Imagination
Posts: 1,557
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Are you letting it cool completely before slicing? That may help some.

I had never baked bread before, and have been avoiding it since I'm trying to stay low-carb. However, the rest of the family eats bread, so I decided to give this a try since it looked so easy.

The best results I've gotten is with "white" whole wheat or plain white (good for taking to a potluck). The 100% WW doesn't rise as much, but it tastes pretty good.

I started a sourdough starter a few days ago, because a PP said she'd replaced the yeast and some of the water with a cup of starter. I wonder if that's all you need to do to get it to be sourdough? Do I need to start a sponge too?

Chicharronita is offline  
Old 03-05-2007, 12:09 PM
 
msiddiqi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Queens, NY
Posts: 757
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicharronita View Post
Are you letting it cool completely before slicing? That may help some.
No... actually I'm not... I'm a bit impatient : I will try that though.
msiddiqi is offline  
Old 04-03-2007, 12:39 PM
 
ani'smommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: co-housing
Posts: 3,190
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I just made this for the first time yesterday and it was AMAZING. I used all-purpose flour this time, but I will probably switch to ww wheat at some point. I started another batch as soon as the first one came out.

I am so so excited that I can actually do this! I am done with buying bread! Yey!
ani'smommy is offline  
Old 04-03-2007, 12:51 PM - Thread Starter
 
yitlan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: NM
Posts: 1,988
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Anyone know how to make a cinnamon raisin version? Add those two ingredients plus a little sweetener before the second rising? Or right before baking?

Zia+Lane+Sonora=Mi Vida Loca! :
yitlan is offline  
Old 04-03-2007, 04:23 PM
 
akmeg's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 281
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I actually just made this for the first time yesterday too and it's awesome!!! I made it with white flour but I'm going to try ww next I think. I wasn't sure how to do this without a big pot so over the weekend I asked dh's grandma if she had something like that that I could just borrow to try it out, and seriously, she had the absolutely most perfect giant ceramic crock you've ever seen! She dug it out of the basement and said she'd never used it before and had had it for 20 years! So she gave it to me! I was soooo excited, who would've thought I could be so excited about a huge old crock!
akmeg is offline  
Old 04-03-2007, 04:47 PM
 
ani'smommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: co-housing
Posts: 3,190
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
This has probably been mentioned, but has anyone had luck with a double batch? I have a pretty large pot I'm using and I think a couble would fit pretty nicely, but would it rise enough?
ani'smommy is offline  
Old 04-03-2007, 07:20 PM - Thread Starter
 
yitlan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: NM
Posts: 1,988
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Any time I've done double, I've divided it into two loaves. It's turned out great that way.

Zia+Lane+Sonora=Mi Vida Loca! :
yitlan is offline  
Old 04-04-2007, 01:43 AM
AJP
 
AJP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: land of the fruits and nuts
Posts: 1,853
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My hubby has baked large batches into one loaf, using a big Mario Battali enameled cast iron pot, it works great, rises fine, bakes fine. I don't remember if the pot is 6 or 8 quarts, but it's 10.5 inches in diameter. He increases the recipe by 50% when making this size loaf (6 cups of flour instead of 4).

There is no secret ingredient.
AJP is offline  
Old 04-04-2007, 06:26 PM
 
HerbanGirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Northern California
Posts: 470
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm so excited to give this a try! I think set up the dough tomorrow so I can do baking on Friday (my day off). I'm going to try 1/2 AP and 1/2 fresh-ground WW...I hope my cast-iron pot isn't too big for the baking. I'll let y'all know how it goes!

We're officially TTC!!!
 
I blog about traditional foods, nurturing creativity, keeping a simple home, and the elements of crafting a meaningful life at www.maggiesnest.org.
HerbanGirl is offline  
Old 04-04-2007, 07:00 PM
 
JennP's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Iowa
Posts: 595
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Just to let you know if you happen to have Bread machine yeast and want to use that the first rise (12-18 hours) was more like 2-3 hours and the second rise (2 hours) was more like 1 hour. I probably used a 1/2 tsp cause I didn't measure but I thought if anyone wanted to try and thats what you have don't plan on leaving it out for even 12 hours, it would have been over the bowl!

This is the GREATEST bread I have ever baked and DH loves it.

Enjoy Jenn
JennP is offline  
Old 04-04-2007, 11:25 PM
 
ani'smommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: co-housing
Posts: 3,190
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJP View Post
My hubby has baked large batches into one loaf, using a big Mario Battali enameled cast iron pot, it works great, rises fine, bakes fine. I don't remember if the pot is 6 or 8 quarts, but it's 10.5 inches in diameter. He increases the recipe by 50% when making this size loaf (6 cups of flour instead of 4).
Thanks! This is good to know. I think I'll do this for my next batch. I've been making one a day and my family eats it right up! I do live with my parents, two sisters and husband, so there are a lot of us, though.
ani'smommy is offline  
Old 04-04-2007, 11:36 PM
 
eleven's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: NY
Posts: 2,798
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I finally made this for the first time over the weekend (I had to manifest a cast iron dutch oven first ). It is SO GOOD! My mother demanded I make another loaf the following day.

I can't wait to try other variations. Has anybody tried making smaller loaves? I think I should be able to separate it into two separate loaves and bake them next to each other in the pot, right? When should one add other ingredients?
eleven is offline  
Old 04-07-2007, 01:14 AM
 
CeciMami's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Vegas baby, VEGAS!!!
Posts: 541
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
:

Me my DH 4.5 year old DS and who just arrived on the scene 6/10 Excited to be blogging! Decluttering in 2010: 2010 / 2010
CeciMami is offline  
Old 04-10-2007, 01:09 AM
 
meowee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 5,773
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
This looks cool, but I don't see how it's really all that different from other overnight rise breads? It looks alot like the one hillbilly housewife has on her site... using less yeast and an overnight rise, to save money. It also sounds quite a bit like how ancient egyptians would make bread, with long rises. So I don't think it's that innovative-- that guy gives himself a bit too much credit!
meowee is offline  
Old 04-10-2007, 03:31 AM
AJP
 
AJP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: land of the fruits and nuts
Posts: 1,853
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
meowee, it's a very wet dough, not kneaded at all (time and moisture develop the gluten), put into an already-hot pan and baked covered (which basically simulates a steam-injected oven since the dough is so wet), then uncovered towards the end to crisp the crust. All these things put together (along with very little yeast) are what seems to set it apart. I don't think this guy featured in the NYT invented it, per se, he put the pieces together. It really comes out very different from any other home-baked bread I've ever had or made, slow-rise or not - it's much more like a professionally-made artisan loaf in texture and flavor. I haven't seen the hillbilly housewife recipe, but others I've seen that people compare it to haven't been very similar, missing several of the features. Each part is important to how different this is from other widely-known home baking methods I'm aware of.

Peace, unless you make it drier than the recipe calls for, two loaves in one pan will ooze together and fuse while baking, I'd guess.

There is no secret ingredient.
AJP is offline  
Old 04-10-2007, 11:28 AM
 
Chicharronita's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: In the Candyland of my Imagination
Posts: 1,557
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJP View Post
It really comes out very different from any other home-baked bread I've ever had or made, slow-rise or not - it's much more like a professionally-made artisan loaf in texture and flavor.
Yes. It's really amazing to me as a bread-making virgin that I was able to make such a beautiful round loaf on my first try. I now make it whenever I'm invited to a potluck or dinner.

Quote:
I haven't seen the hillbilly housewife recipe, but others I've seen that people compare it to haven't been very similar, missing several of the features. Each part is important to how different this is from other widely-known home baking methods I'm aware of.
Her recipes are for making a regular loaf. It calls for a lot of kneading, too, which is why I had never attempted making bread before (too lazy!).

Chicharronita is offline  
Old 04-10-2007, 11:37 AM
 
tboroson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Honalee
Posts: 6,187
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I wonder if a variation of this would work, using kefir instead of water and yeast, or sourdough starter. You'd have the acid environment for breaking down the phytates, and the yeasts natural to the kefir. I'm a'thinking this because I used kefir to soak spelt flour for muffins a few days ago, and in the morning when I went to bake it, it was *very* bread-dough like. I mixed additional ingredients in at that point, which kind of broke up the gluten strands. But, they still had a bready texture as opposed to a cakey texture. The flavor had kind of a sweet/tart sour-doughy thing going.
tboroson is offline  
Old 04-10-2007, 03:01 PM
 
meowee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 5,773
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I used to make a similar variation of this...a very wet dough let to rise once for 4-6 hours, then cooked as is, in the metal bowl it rose in.

Here is the link to the hillbilly housewife bread (it's at the bottom, the low yeast variation):

http://www.hillbillyhousewife.com/familybread.htm
meowee is offline  
Old 04-10-2007, 06:42 PM
 
eleven's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: NY
Posts: 2,798
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJP View Post

Peace, unless you make it drier than the recipe calls for, two loaves in one pan will ooze together and fuse while baking, I'd guess.
You're absolutely right - I didn't think of that. It would probably make a pretty cool half and half loaf, though.

I haven't tried adding ingredients yet, but made my first whole wheat loaf today. Yum!
eleven is offline  
 
User Tag List

Thread Tools


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off