can I freeze raw milk - Mothering Forums
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 17 Old 11-20-2006, 07:34 PM - Thread Starter
 
Feb2003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 839
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
will all of the good "stuff" survive? will it taste OK?

I can get it by the gallon once a week, but we find that it doesn't taste as good later in the week so I didn't know if I could freeze half just for a few days and then thaw...
Feb2003 is offline  
#2 of 17 Old 11-20-2006, 07:35 PM
 
pampered_mom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Somewhere short of crazy
Posts: 4,540
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
You sure can freeze it! :0)

There are a couple of methods out there, but I just prefer freezing it as, thawing it partly in a sink of warm water, and the rest of the way in the fridge. It seems to address the issue of the cream not mixing back in, although not completely.
pampered_mom is offline  
#3 of 17 Old 11-20-2006, 07:39 PM - Thread Starter
 
Feb2003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 839
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
WOW, you're quick to reply!!! Thanks for your method.

Does it sound normal that our raw milk tastes "off" within a week? My dh was dubious about raw, but a willing participant until it tasted funny...I thought that all of the "good stuff" would keep it fresh longer...
Feb2003 is offline  
#4 of 17 Old 11-20-2006, 08:03 PM
 
tboroson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Honalee
Posts: 6,340
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think different people have varying levels of sensitivity to sourness in milk. I can go two weeks or more on milk, and drink it on the verge of curdling, without finding it distastful; but, I'm not a milk drinker, per se. I use it more for kefir and yogurt and in my tea. But I've known people to find the same milk too sour after one week.
tboroson is offline  
#5 of 17 Old 11-20-2006, 08:11 PM
 
pampered_mom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Somewhere short of crazy
Posts: 4,540
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I would agree with tboroson. Everyone has different levels of tolerance for sourness. You have to remember that raw milk will tend to sour "quicker" than pasturized will. This is normal and to be expected. I find it important to make sure that the milk is always kep REALLY cold to help extend its life. I have taken out the lightbulb that is over the shelf where I keep my milk and cover it with a tea towel as well. It seems to help.
pampered_mom is offline  
#6 of 17 Old 11-20-2006, 08:38 PM - Thread Starter
 
Feb2003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 839
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
thanks, ladies!!!

I'm so glad there are ways to extend the life...I really want to switch to raw again!
Feb2003 is offline  
#7 of 17 Old 11-20-2006, 08:49 PM
 
tboroson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Honalee
Posts: 6,340
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Sorry, got called away before I could say everything I wanted to say

As a PP said, the colder you keep it, the longer it keeps. So, if you're not going to use it, put it in the back bottom corner of the fridge. Maybe divide it out into a couple of quart jars so it fits well and you can take one out at a time.

If you freeze it, the fat globules will break and start to stick to one another; the result is, you won't be able to get the fat globules all to re-combine with the milk later. Not a bad thing, but it's pretty creepy to have globs of fat floating on top of your cheerios
tboroson is offline  
#8 of 17 Old 11-20-2006, 09:34 PM
 
Sharondio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 586
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Bottom back of the fridge is where all my unopened bottles go. Opened one is in the front (because I'm lazy.) I routinely get 2+ weeks out of my milk with no degradation in taste or texture.
Sharondio is offline  
#9 of 17 Old 11-20-2006, 11:13 PM - Thread Starter
 
Feb2003's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 839
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by tboroson View Post
it's pretty creepy to have globs of fat floating on top of your cheerios
you're eating cheerios???!!!??? those extruded tiny donuts of whole grain might kill you (just kidding... ever since reading NT, I laugh at myself hanging out in the cereal isle trying so hard to find something, anything that isn't extruded!)

seriously, breaking the gallon into smaller jars is a great idea and so is covering the remaining ones in the back corner with a dish towel to maintain a cooler temp.

thanks!
Feb2003 is offline  
#10 of 17 Old 11-21-2006, 01:44 AM
 
yitlan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: NM
Posts: 1,993
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I remember reading someone suggest putting a teaspoon of baking soda in the milk before freezing and that helping with the fat globs. Anyone tried this?

Zia+Lane+Sonora=Mi Vida Loca! :
yitlan is offline  
#11 of 17 Old 11-21-2006, 09:26 AM
 
rstump's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Where the pastures are green
Posts: 734
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yes the baking soda works.

What we usually do it just freeze...If I remember I go in and shake the gallon after about an hour to distribute more of the cream. When I defrost...I put it in quart wide mouth mason jars and use a stick blender to break up the cream. It works great and my family can't tell the difference.
rstump is offline  
#12 of 17 Old 11-21-2006, 11:02 AM
 
tboroson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Honalee
Posts: 6,340
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Feb2003 View Post
you're eating cheerios???!!!??? those extruded tiny donuts of whole grain might kill you (just kidding... ever since reading NT, I laugh at myself hanging out in the cereal isle trying so hard to find something, anything that isn't extruded!)
Actually, no, since they're not gluten free. I have seriously cut down on cereals here, though my girls still occasionally get GF "o's" type cereal as a treat - dry, though, not with milk, because they like to run around the house with it. "Cheerio's" is just, I dunno, a common expression of sorts. Like, when dh gets all grumpy, I ask him who pissed in his cheerios this morning. Or, when my girls are acting maniacal, I grumble that maybe they should stop sprinkling crack on their cheerios. And, since I've never been one for drinking a glass of milk, historically most of the fresh milk I used was for cereal; even though I didn't eat cheerios often, it was kind of the "generic" cereal from a verbal perspective
tboroson is offline  
#13 of 17 Old 11-21-2006, 01:54 PM
 
provocativa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,794
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
How much room do you leave at the top of a jar to allow for expansion?
provocativa is offline  
#14 of 17 Old 11-21-2006, 07:47 PM
 
pampered_mom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Somewhere short of crazy
Posts: 4,540
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by yitlan View Post
I remember reading someone suggest putting a teaspoon of baking soda in the milk before freezing and that helping with the fat globs. Anyone tried this?
I have - and all I have to say is ICK! IME it drastically changed the way the milk tasted and I could not choke it down. I have a gallon that I froze that way in my freezer and would rather drive over an hour one way to get more than defrost and drink it! Now I'm stuck with a whole gallon...I'm thinking I'll just use it for cooking and kefir.
pampered_mom is offline  
#15 of 17 Old 11-21-2006, 08:48 PM
 
sedalbj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 1,269
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by rstump View Post
Yes the baking soda works.

What we usually do it just freeze...If I remember I go in and shake the gallon after about an hour to distribute more of the cream. When I defrost...I put it in quart wide mouth mason jars and use a stick blender to break up the cream. It works great and my family can't tell the difference.
I have to try this!
sedalbj is offline  
#16 of 17 Old 11-22-2006, 12:07 AM
 
Bestbirths's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Lyme-Autism Connection Conference
Posts: 2,249
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I am new at learning about this too, but just found out that some kind of exploding of the cells in the milk does occur with freezing and thawing that makes previously frozen milk unsuitable for making into kefir or fermenting. If your the kind of person who doesn't use yeast because it explodes the grain on a cellular level, than this exploding thing going on in the freezing process of milk would probably concern you.

I am concerned because we are trying to get the most nutritional value out of the expensive milk...fresh and frozen both cost 5 or 6 dollars a gallon, so why not get the most nutrition by getting fresh and fermenting which increases the nutritional value by 10 percent? Fermented milk keeps in the fridge for a month. It also tastes better and better with age....so you don't have to worry about spoilage. To make yogurt out of the milk increases the probiotics and it keeps in the fridge a month as well. We replace kefir or yogurt in reciepes that call for milk. Fermenting is best when done within 48 hours of the milk coming from the cow or goat.

My dd will not drink previously frozen milk, she will only drink fresh. With the kefir and yogurt, we add fruit and maple syrup to get used to the tartness.

Bestbirths is offline  
#17 of 17 Old 11-22-2006, 12:52 AM
 
pampered_mom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Somewhere short of crazy
Posts: 4,540
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bestbirths View Post
I am new at learning about this too, but just found out that some kind of exploding of the cells in the milk does occur with freezing and thawing that makes previously frozen milk unsuitable for making into kefir or fermenting.
As in the results don't turn out as well, or? I use my frozen milk to make kefir all the time. I'd be interested in hearing more if you have addt'l info or links.
pampered_mom is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off